Color & Light: A Family Melodrama

Tuesday, February 16, 2016, 7 - 8:30pm

Add to Calendar

Still from 'All that Heaven Allows' (1955) directed by Douglas Sirk

Still from 'All that Heaven Allows' (1955) directed by Douglas Sirk

In a free, public lecture Jarrett Earnest will discuss the idiosyncrasies of color as we experience it out in the world and in our lives, including discussions of cyanobacteria, stained glass, the abbot Suger of St. Denis, Anna Betbeze, and All That Heaven Allows. The focus will be on color in time; fugitive, wandering color; on colors as Light’s children—a family melodrama.

Jarrett Earnest is a writer living in New York City. He teaches and is faculty liaison at the free experimental art school the Bruce High Quality Foundation University (BHQFU); and is co-founder of the alternative art space 1:1 in the lower east side (2011-2012). His criticism and long-form interviews have appeared in the Brooklyn Rail, The Village Voice, ​Art in America, San Francisco Arts Quarterly, Art Practical, and many other publications.

This lecture is part of the Spring 2016 Intradisciplinary Seminar, part of the Robert Lehman Visiting Artist Program at The Cooper Union. We are grateful for major funding support from the Robert Lehman Foundation, Inc.

Located in the Frederick P. Rose Auditorium, at 41 Cooper Square (on Third Avenue between 6th and 7th Streets)

  • Founded by inventor, industrialist and philanthropist Peter Cooper in 1859, The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art offers education in art, architecture and engineering, as well as courses in the humanities and social sciences.

  • “My feelings, my desires, my hopes, embrace humanity throughout the world,” Peter Cooper proclaimed in a speech in 1853. He looked forward to a time when, “knowledge shall cover the earth as waters cover the great deep.”

  • From its beginnings, Cooper Union was a unique institution, dedicated to founder Peter Cooper's proposition that education is the key not only to personal prosperity but to civic virtue and harmony.

  • Peter Cooper wanted his graduates to acquire the technical mastery and entrepreneurial skills, enrich their intellects and spark their creativity, and develop a sense of social justice that would translate into action.