The campus is closed and staff will work remotely at least until the governor announces the reopening of the New York City Region. See the Coronavirus / COVID-19 Updates page.

3D Motion Design

Cost: $1060.00

This class will be held online. Class size is limited to 16 students to insure plenty of individual feedback. 

Tue., Jun. 02 – Tue., Aug. 04, 2020
6:30PM – 9:30PM
tuition: $ 1060
location: Online

REGISTER NOW

Our world is not 2D, nor is it static. Our work doesn’t have to be either.

This 10-week course was created to give designers, typographers, and architects the tools to bring their work to life in three dimensions. You will be introduced to the basic techniques for creating 3D motion graphics. We will look at the history of 3D motion design and animation as well as some of the most exciting contemporary examples of 3D in advertising, gaming, publishing, education, and entertainment.

You will leave this course with an understanding of 3D content creation pipelines, grounding in fundamental 3D animation techniques, and an enthusiasm for bringing your ideas to life.
 

Required Materials

  • Computer or laptop with Cinema4D R20 or later (educational license is acceptable).
  • Photoshop CC 2015 or later
  • Sketchbook and pencils or pens
  • With your proof of enrollment, students will qualify for a free educational license from Maxon.

COURSE SYLLABUS

  • Week 1 - Getting Comfortable with 3D
    In class: Welcome and introductions. Cinema 4D versions, setup, licensing. What is a 3D pipeline? Basic navigation, first project demo.
    Homework: Join class Google Drive. Create your workspace in 3D.
  • Week 2 - Spline-based Geometry
    In class: Modeling with splines: lathe, sweep, extrude, loft, and more.
    Homework: Recreate a 2D poster in 3D.
  • Week 3 - Polygon-based Modeling
    In class: Modeling with primitives, editable objects, vertices, edges, and faces
    Homework: Design and create a new toy or product in 3D
  • Week 4 - Making 3D Look Good
    In class: Lighting & Materials
    Homework: Add materials and lighting to your 3D product
  • Week 5 - Time to Get Moving!
    In class: Animation in Cinema 4D: Frames, keys, and curves! Compositing 3D in After Effects.
    Homework: Create a showcase animation and render the final sequence for your product
  • Week 6 - Mograph Madness!
    In class: Product animation showcase and critiques. Mograph: Cloners, fractures, effectors, and more
    Homework: Create 5 type based animations each using a different mograph tool
  • Week 7 - Final Project Time
    In class: Mograph presentations. Animated worlds: Mood boards, storyboards and style frames.
    Homework: Create 3 mood boards, storyboards for your world, and style frames. Consider the animated elements in your environment.
  • Week 8 - Final Project Time
    In class: Present your ideas and begin work on your final project. Questions and answers.
    Homework: Model your environment. Begin to add lights and materials.
  • Week 9 - Final Project Time
    In class: Work session. Questions and answers.
    Homework: Complete your final project: Models, lighting, materials, animation, and rendered sequences.
  • Week 10 - Final Project Presentations and Critiques
    In class: Final project critiques. Answering any final questions.
    Homework: None! You’re done!
  • Course Code: 3DMD

    Instructor(s): Sara Wade

    • Founded by inventor, industrialist and philanthropist Peter Cooper in 1859, The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art offers education in art, architecture and engineering, as well as courses in the humanities and social sciences.

    • “My feelings, my desires, my hopes, embrace humanity throughout the world,” Peter Cooper proclaimed in a speech in 1853. He looked forward to a time when, “knowledge shall cover the earth as waters cover the great deep.”

    • From its beginnings, Cooper Union was a unique institution, dedicated to founder Peter Cooper's proposition that education is the key not only to personal prosperity but to civic virtue and harmony.

    • Peter Cooper wanted his graduates to acquire the technical mastery and entrepreneurial skills, enrich their intellects and spark their creativity, and develop a sense of social justice that would translate into action.