speeches | Miquel Garcia

Monday, December 1, 2014 7:00 - 8:00pm

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The methodology that I use begins with the project; it involves the different artworks created during the process and the context that surrounds them. Its formalization is developed through different supports: videos registering performances, graphic design interventions and actions in public space, posters, drawings and sculptures. I work with objects and daily situations, my personal objects, adhesive stripes, adds, coins and desk materials.

I am interested in the power of fictional documents, dislocating and re-contextualizing the object. These projects are narratives built through appropriated or personal texts. I am interested, as well, in the search of the gaps, the omission, in hidden or forgotten memories, or the focalization of changes in history, its development and destruction.

The last artworks are the result of a long period of research, and each one generates the next. They are an attempt to define territories, experiences and human reactions that are linked to the socio-political formation of the present day world, the migration and exclusion and the social development of survival strategies.

Speeches reflects on disappearance of analog systems to digital, manipulating the past in contemporary discourses. 

Located in The Great Hall, in the Foundation Building, 7 East 7th Street, between Third and Fourth Avenues

  • Founded by inventor, industrialist and philanthropist Peter Cooper in 1859, The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art offers education in art, architecture and engineering, as well as courses in the humanities and social sciences.

  • “My feelings, my desires, my hopes, embrace humanity throughout the world,” Peter Cooper proclaimed in a speech in 1853. He looked forward to a time when, “knowledge shall cover the earth as waters cover the great deep.”

  • From its beginnings, Cooper Union was a unique institution, dedicated to founder Peter Cooper's proposition that education is the key not only to personal prosperity but to civic virtue and harmony.

  • Peter Cooper wanted his graduates to acquire the technical mastery and entrepreneurial skills, enrich their intellects and spark their creativity, and develop a sense of social justice that would translate into action.