OSHA 30 for Construction

The OSHA 30-Hour Construction Industry Health & Safety course teaches OSHA regulations and standards as they apply to the construction industry. The course covers practices of identifying, reducing, eliminating and reporting on-site hazards. It also teaches safety awareness and assists supervisors in recognizing and reducing risks in the workplace.

Copies of the standards are available for purchase from OSHA, or they can be downloaded free of charge from OSHA's website. Both 29 CFR 1910 and 29 CFR 1926 are easy to follow, read and access through OSHA's user-friendly site.

The Occupational Safety and Health Act was enacted to provide on-the-job safety and health conditions for American employees. The act established the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), and assigned it a general duty to ensure that employers keep their workplaces free from hazards likely to cause death or serious harm to employees. The act also gave the Secretary of Labor the authority to impose more specific duties or standards to certain high-risk industries by adopting additional standards if necessary.

Despite overall improvements, annual accident statistics have shown that the construction industry remains one of the most hazardous to workers. Each year, more than 1,000 construction workers die and 400,000 more suffer injuries or illnesses on the job. Because of this, the Secretary of Labor, in conjunction with OSHA, set forth specific standards for the construction industry. These can be found in 29 CFR Part 1926.

The construction industry standards designate the specific conditions required by all construction-industry employers. The standards are revised annually and cover a variety of construction work and processes, from residential to commercial. Construction-industry employers are legally bound to comply with these standards, as well as any related 29 CFR Part 1910 general-industry standards that also apply.

This program will assist employers in training supervisors for competent person status. The training covers a variety of construction safety and health hazards which a worker may encounter at a construction site. OSHA recommends this training as an orientation to occupational health and safety. Training should emphasize hazard identification, avoidance, control, and prevention.

Topics To Be Covered Include:

  • Introduction to OSHA 
  • OSHA Focus Four Hazards
  • OSH Act, General Duty Clause, Employer and Employee Rights and Responsibilities
  • Whistleblower Rights, Recordkeeping Basics
  • Inspections, Citations, and Penalties
  • General Safety and Health Provisions
  • Competent Person
  • Value of Safety and Health
  • Fall Protection
  • Electrical
  • Struck by (e.g., falling objects, trucks, cranes)
  • Caught in/between (e.g., trench hazards, equipment)
  • Personal Protective and Lifesaving Equipment
  • Health Hazards in Construction (e.g., noise, hazards communication and crystalline silica)
  • Materials Handling, Storage, Use and Disposal
  • Tools (Hand and Power)
  • Scaffolds
  • Stairways and Ladders

Compliance Code: 29 CFR 1926 - Occupational Safety and Health Standards for the Construction Industry
OSHA Focus Four Training
OSHA Poster [PDF]
OSHA - Employers Must Provide and Pay for PPE [PDF]
OSHA - Your Rights as a Whistleblower Fact Sheet [PDF]
Workers’ rights under the OSH Act [PDF]
OSHA: Workers Rights Crossword Puzzle [PDF]
A Safety Video

BSI Group Conference Resources

Principle Instructor

Mark Drozdov, SSM, CSFSM, CAI, CMA
IICRC Director
ASSP NYC Technical Programs Chair
ACEC Member of Continuing Education Committee
AIHA ACTIONS Committee Officer, Standards Advisory Panel, OSHA+AIHA Metro NY Alliance Chair

The Retraining program is made possible through generous donations from the Robin Hood Foundation and Con Edison. The Retraining Program would also like to thank our individual donors for support.

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