Student Lecture Series | Joyce Hwang: Architecture for the Collective

Friday, November 19, 2021, 6:30 - 8:30pm

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Image courtesy of Joyce Hwang

Image courtesy of Joyce Hwang. 

This presentation will be conducted in person and through Zoom. Zoom account registration is required, please register in advance here. 

Joyce Hwang is Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies of Architecture at the University at Buffalo, State University of New York, and Founder of Ants of the Prairie, an office of architectural practice and research that focuses on confronting contemporary ecological conditions through creative means. For over a decade, Hwang has been developing a series of projects that incorporate wildlife habitats into constructed environments. She is a recipient of the Exhibit Columbus University Research Design Fellowship (2020-21), the Architectural League Emerging Voices Award (2014), the New York Foundation for the Arts (NYFA) Fellowship (2013), the New York State Council on the Arts (NYSCA) Independent Project Grant (2013, 2008), and the MacDowell Fellowship (2016, 2011). Her work has been exhibited at Matadero Madrid, the Venice Architecture Biennale, and the Rotterdam International Architecture Biennale, among other venues. Hwang’s projects and writing have been featured in publications including Curbed, Good, Praxis, Azure Magazine, Architect Magazine, Architectural Review, AV Proyectos, Bracket, MONU, Biophilic Cities Journal, Volume Magazine, and Next Nature. She is a co-organizer of the Hive City Habitat Design Competition and a co-editor of Beyond Patronage: Reconsidering Models of Practice, published by Actar. Hwang is on the Steering Committee for US Architects Declare, and serves as a Core Organizer for Dark Matter University.

Hwang is a registered architect in New York State, and has practiced professionally with offices in New York, Philadelphia, San Francisco, and Barcelona. She received a post-professional Master of Architecture degree from Princeton University and a Bachelor of Architecture degree from Cornell University, where she was awarded the Charles Goodwin Sands Memorial Bronze Medal.

The lecture will be followed by a discussion moderated by Martina Duque. 

Current Cooper Union students, faculty, and staff may attend the lecture in Room 315F. The general public may participate in this lecture through Zoom. 

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