Entanglements | Janette Kim + Lydia Kallipoliti: Beneath the Dome and the Closed World

Wednesday, September 23, 2020, 6:30 - 8:30pm

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This event will be conducted through Zoom. Please register in advance here. Zoom account registration is required.

This Entanglement reflects on the politics and atmospheres of enclosure. Janette Kim will lecture on two projects that rework the risks and rewards of climate change. The first, called Bartertown, is a board game that asks how new networks of care and sociability can emerge in a world without money. The second, called Resilient Equity Hubs, imagines collective property arrangements that can redistribute risk to a more expansive, and inclusive, collective. This project emerged from Janette’s involvement in the Resilient by Design Bay Area Challenge. Lydia Kallipoliti will follow with a brief presentation of her book The Architecture of Closed Worlds presented in the format of a manifesto.

A live debate and conversation will follow moderated by Farzin Lofti-Jam.

Janette Kim is an architectural designer, researcher, and educator based in the San Francisco Bay Area. Her work focuses on the intersection between ecology, social equity and the built environment. Janette is assistant professor of architecture and co-director of the Urban Works Agency at California College of the Arts and founding principal of the design practice All of the Above. Janette's recent projects include a submission for the Resilient by Design Bay Area Challenge (with the All Bay Collective) entitled “The Estuary Commons,” and a series of board games called “Win-Win,” which have been exhibited at the 2019 Oslo Architecture Triennial and the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, and were created in partnership with state agencies including the Bay Conservation and Development Commission. Janette is also author of The Underdome Guide to Energy Reform (Princeton Architectural Press 2015, with Erik Carver) and creator of the Safari audio tours on urban ecology (with Kate Orff and MTWTF). Her work has been awarded by the Graham Foundation, AIA San Francisco, and the Van Alen Institute New York Prize Fellowship, and has been featured in NPR’s ‘Brian Lehrer Show,’ Artforum, Architect, Frame, GOOD, and the feature-length documentary, The Grove.

Prior to the CCA, Janette has taught at Syracuse University and at Columbia University, where she directed the Applied Research Practices in Architecture initiative, the Urban Landscape Lab, and served as founding editor of ARPA Journal, a digital publication on applied research practices in architecture. Janette holds a Masters of Architecture from Princeton University and a Bachelor of Arts from Columbia University.

Lydia Kallipoliti is an architect, engineer, scholar and an Assistant Professor at the Cooper Union in New York. She is the author of The Architecture of Closed Worlds (2018), the editor of EcoRedux; Design Remedies for an Ailing Planet (AD 2011) and the Head Co-Curator of the upcoming Tallin Architecture Biennale. She holds a SMArchS from MIT and a PhD from Princeton University. Kallipoliti has previously taught at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Syracuse University and Columbia University. She is currently an Assistant Professor at the Irwin S. Chanin School of Architecture at the Cooper Union and the principal of ANAcycle thinktank.

This event is free and accessible to the public. 

View the full Fall 2020 Lectures and Events List.


 

  • Founded by inventor, industrialist and philanthropist Peter Cooper in 1859, The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art offers education in art, architecture and engineering, as well as courses in the humanities and social sciences.

  • “My feelings, my desires, my hopes, embrace humanity throughout the world,” Peter Cooper proclaimed in a speech in 1853. He looked forward to a time when, “knowledge shall cover the earth as waters cover the great deep.”

  • From its beginnings, Cooper Union was a unique institution, dedicated to founder Peter Cooper's proposition that education is the key not only to personal prosperity but to civic virtue and harmony.

  • Peter Cooper wanted his graduates to acquire the technical mastery and entrepreneurial skills, enrich their intellects and spark their creativity, and develop a sense of social justice that would translate into action.