Course Listings


Foundation

Foundation courses are required of all first year students.

  • FA 100.1, FA 100.2

    Introduction to Techniques

    An introduction to the physical aspects of working with wood, metal, plaster - and plastics, as well as an introduction to on-campus computer facilities and resources. A basic introduction to the Adobe interface, specifically Photoshop and Illustrator will be provided.

    Required for first year students. 1/2 credit per semester. One-year course. Pass/Fail. Staff

  • FA 101

    Color

    A study of the physical, perceptual, art historical and cultural aspects of color. The phenomenon of color and principles of light are explored in various media towards an understanding of color application in all of the fine art disciplines and architecture.

    Required for first year students. 2 credits. Fall only. Backström/Raven/Jones/Hewitt

  • FA 102.1 FA 102.2

    Two-Dimensional Design

    Exploration of the visual and intellectual aspects of form on the two-dimensional surface, in a variety of media. Investigations into the relationships of perception, process and presentation.

    Required for first year students. 3 credits per semester. One-year course. Harris/I. Raad/Rub/Waters

  • FA 104.1, FA 104.2

    Basic Drawing (Analytical and Descriptive)

    A course in freehand drawing designed to emphasize perceptual and inventive skills in all drawing media.

    Required for first year students. 3 credits per semester. One-year course. Brown/Hoffman/Masnyj/Robinson

  • FA 105

    Four-Dimensional Design

    This course investigates the properties of time and movement and the fundamentals of four-dimensional design. Students explore duration, condensation, expansion, interruption, simultaneity, stillness, action and situation through a wide range of materials.

    Required for first year students. 3 credits. Spring only. Backström/Laris Cohen/Lehyt/Raven

  • FA 109.1, FA 109.2

    Three-Dimensional Design

    Students work on projects that explore the fundamentals of forms and space and investigate the properties of materials, structure, mass, scale, light and motion.

    Required for first year students. 3 credits per semester. One-year course. Adams/Ashford/Cetera/Imber/Schrader

  • SE 150

    Foundation Project

    A course that brings together all Foundation year students around a series of presentations that introduce various artistic practices, critical languages, and criticism. The course intends to present contrasting historical and contemporary models of creating, seeing, speaking and thinking about art.

    Required for first year students. 1 credit.


Calligraphy

  • FA 419

    Independent Study in Calligraphy

    1-3 credits. Requires approval of instructor and the Dean of the School of Art.

  • TE 216

    Calligraphy

    Geometry, optical balance and the stroke of the broad-edge pen are primary influences that shape the Roman alphabet. Students learn the fundamentals of “beautiful writing” through the study of historical models and the principles that are the basis of classical and modern letterforms. Exercises in ink train the hand kinaesthetically to write letters with graceful movement. Exercises in pencil train the eye to see and analyze the subtle geometry and skeletal “ideal” form of letters. Precise rhythm in letterspacing and careful line-spacing create the color and texture of the page. The class will have an emphasis on page design involving hand written compositions. Roman and Italic capitals and small letters will be the focus of first semester students. Those who repeat may be introduced to other historical hands.

    2 credits. One-semester course. May be repeated once. Free elective credit. DiEdwardo


Computer Techniques

  • TE 303

    Techniques in Photoshop: Digital Workflow

    This course explores techniques and projects in Photoshop. Students will complete projects that develop their skills and understanding of digital image creation. Students will both apply and experiment with the software relative to projects that they are engaged in or planning. A structured series of workshops will be presented to help students experience various tools, methods and models relative to image construction, manipulation and rendering.

    2 credits, 4 contact hours. One-semester course. Cannot be repeated. Free elective credit.

  • TE 304

    Techniques in After Effects

    This course explores techniques and projects in Adobe After Effects. Students will complete projects that demonstrate their skill and understanding of visual effects and motion graphics. Projects will be faculty and student generated.

    2 credits. One-semester course. Cannot be repeated. Free elective credit. Garrett

  • TE 305

    Techniques in HTML and Programming

    This course explores programming techniques using HTML, CSS, Javascript and other data formats. Students will complete projects that demonstrate their skill and understanding of building web sites and basic programming. The purpose of this course is for the student to develop the skills necessary to utilize the many and varied web technologies for their artistic and professional practices.

    2 credits. One-semester course. Cannot be repeated. Free elective credit. Sparling/Bailey


Audiovisual

  • FA 272

    AV: Film Workshop

    Independent projects workshop in Super 8 and 16mm film. As well as working in depth with film, students are encouraged to explore all possibilities of the moving image from expanded projection techniques to kinetic constructions.

    credits. One-semester course. prerequisite: audiovisual I. Perlin

  • FA 275

    Audiovisual I

    An introduction to concepts, production techniques, and histories of artists moving image work. Over two semesters, students will investigate the origins and evolution of animation, film, video, and sound recording for cinema, with classroom instruction and experimentation in the techniques and production of each. Alongside a historical and theoretical framework, a wide range of practical tools will be introduced, including precinematic image capture, 16mm film and digital cinema production, stop action animation, sound recording, and lighting.

    3 credits. One-semester course. May not be repeated. Hedditch/Liu/McWreath

  • FA 276

    Audiovisual II

    Semester two of the yearlong AV sequence, this course continues with greater depth and more individualized student projects, the introduction to concepts, production techniques, and histories of artists’ moving image work. Students will investigate the origins and evolution of animation, film, video, and sound recording for cinema, with classroom instruction and experimentation in the techniques and production of each. Alongside a historical and theoretical framework, a wide range of practical tools will be introduced, including pre-cinematic image capture, 16mm film and digital cinema production, stop action animation, sound recording, and lighting.

    3 credits.. Prerequisite: Audiovisual I. Hedditch/Liu/McWreath.

  • FA 376

    Animation Workshop

    An advanced course in frame by frame film making. An examination of existing work in the field will accompany the development of independent projects, ranging from traditional cartoon animation to fine art-based experimentation. Films begun in Animation I can be carried to completion in this course. Techniques can vary from simple index card animation to elaborate combinations of cel and rotoscope. The relationship of sound to image will be explored and sound tracks produced. Individual projects will be completed on 16mm film with the option to transfer final work to video

    3 credits. One-semester course. Prerequisite: AV I. Reeves

  • FA 380A/B, FA 385A/B, FA 386A/B, FA 387A/B, FA 389A/

    AV Projects

    Topics change each semester.

    For Fall 2020:

    X the Unknown, Raven

    Borrowing its title from a 1956 horror sci-fi film of the same name, this course will examine questions around unknowable, ambivalent threat made material in the form of monsters, natural disasters, and unexpected turns of event. Focusing on subjects in cult sci-fi and horror films, artist videos, mainstream and “reality” TV, and the news, we will examine larger collective fears and anxieties—both contemporary and historic—given form by these figures. With a particular focus on those “monsters" that resist easy description in language, or are otherwise unknowable, we will explore the powerful, uneasy potential of animate form devoid of rational motivation. Readings, screenings, and class discussion will take off from this shared line of inquiry, but student may work on individually chosen project.

    Can I Have Your Attention, Please? – Attention, Distraction, Boredom, and the Moving Image, Visiting Artist John Menick

    From social media to smartphones, multiplexes to museums, our attention is in constant demand. Under advanced capitalism, attention has become a kind of currency: limited, exchangeable, unable to be subdivided too minutely or given out too freely. For many, limited attention is coupled with a nearly constant sense of anxiety and loss. Our attention is always deferred from things we feel are important: loved ones, family, work, reading, or simply doing nothing. Some, meanwhile, embrace the pleasures of distraction and consciously volunteer for a lifestyle of highspeed multitasking. We all, however, operate under a single economic and cultural regime, one that keeps consumers active, entertained, engaged, and all the time free from capitalism’s longtime bugbear: unproductive boredom. This course argues that artists working in the moving image have always been concerned with the problems of attention, distraction, and boredom. The so-called “slow cinema” movement, seemingly uninterested in entertaining its audiences, has turned to a moviemaking made up of long takes and a lack of spectacular action. Video artists and film essayists have deconstructed how capital uses sexuality, women’s bodies, violence, and fear as techniques to capture and commercialize our gaze. Some composers have attempted to deflect audience attention entirely, releasing music that happily exists as background accompaniment in airports and other liminal spaces. Accelerationist practices have conversely worked to mimic the rapid-fire commercial imagery that saturate our media landscape. Through screenings, discussions, and readings, we will consider as many approaches to the problems of attention. Screenings will include works by Michael Snow, Marguerite Duras, João César Monteiro, Gretchen Bender, Otolith Group, Lawrence Abu Hamdan, Adam Curtis, Józef Robakowski, Chantal Akerman, Mika Rottenberg, and others.

    Please note that students are not required to make work on the subject of attention and may work on any projects they please.

    Talk Show, Visiting Artist Thomas Beard

    The primary task at hand for this advanced audiovisual studio course is straightforward: to produce a talk show, collectively, as a class. Our work on such a project will then lead us down numerous paths of historical and theoretical inquiry as we examine every aspect of the talk show—its functions as a social environment as well as a cultural idiom. These efforts will occasion us to study linguistics and nonverbal communication in granular detail, to better understand the mechanics of speech and the expressive vocabulary of the body. We will also consider the shifting conceptions of conversation across eras, with readings ranging from Cicero's On Duties to Jonathan Swift's "Hints towards an Essay on Conversation" to Sherry Turkle on "the power of talk in the digital age." Finally, we will approach the talk show as a televisual genre, tracing its evolution, with special attention to both its stylistic character and its role in shaping the public sphere.

    3 credits. One-semester course

  • FA 381

    Digital Sound Design Workshop

    People don't usually notice the soundtrack, but it makes a big difference in how they see a movie. A movie with a sketchy track simply does not look good. This is a course about how sound, music, and noise work in art and life, how they affect our emotions and what we see, and how they stimulate and dull our imaginations. We will explore how various kinds of sound, music and noise can be used to strengthen and illustrate relationships and add dimension to visual images (and vice versa), and how they can be used to provide clues to what is occurring visually, create a sense of space (depth) and place (location), focus attention on objects and actions, and create psychological (emotional) ambience. We will learn to listen analytically, by looking at diverse movies and listening to their soundtracks, as well as the world around us. The course is also a workshop in using digital and analog tools and techniques to design sounds and soundtracks, using Pro Tools and other softwares.

    3 credits. Offered Fall and Spring. Pre- or corequisite: AVI or Motion Graphics. May not be repeated. Burckhardt

  • FA 382A, FA 382B

    The Question of the Document

    This class is open to students working in all forms. Students are expected to initiate and work on independent projects—individually or in groups and must be willing to show work in class while in the process of making it. The focus of the class will be on the question of the document in media art and related themes of history, facticity, testimony, witnessing and evidence. Students are expected to attend all screenings and exhibitions, keep up with the assigned readings and write short papers.

    3 credits. Pre- or corequisite: One advanced studio course. May be repeated with a different instructor Raad

  • FA 385A

    AV Projects

    Section I -- Dynamic Range
    This course is organized around individual student-driven works in relation to three invited guest artists/ filmmakers, each of whom will be with us for three weeks. Dynamic range in cinema is used to refer to the difference between the darkest and lightest tones in an image—ostensibly pure black to pure white. These two absolute values are fugitive in most moving images, and the range between them can be affected by many factors— technological, phenomenological, historical, any many still to be explored. Throughout the semester, our readings, guest visits, discussions, and screenings will examine, break down, and at times, reform the ideologies underpinning those values that define dynamic range.

    Section II -- Guest Artist Series: Bill Morrison. Discovered Footage
    If all recordings in some way embody human thought, the moving image, accompanied by sound, is the perhaps best approximation of our consciousness. By extension, the storage of the moving image is a model of human memory taken to a societal level – a collective memory. Students will be encouraged to find existing media that in some way is in dialogue with their experience as sentient beings in the real world today. This can take many forms. They can source physical, analog films, or download digital imagery via the internet. They can access their family’s archives. They can seek out lost or “forgotten” moving images, and try to discover how it came to be marginalized, and what their role is in uncovering it anew. Each student is encouraged to evaluate their own history - personal, familial, cultural, political, or other – and to arrive as a way of reconciling that history with the world that they live in today.

    Section IV -- Visiting Artist Paul Pfeiffer
    Advanced projects class in audio-video post-production and the everyday. This class will explore the digital post-production studio as a space defining the limits of contemporary society and individual experience, technologically and ontologically. How are the handheld devices and apps we use daily like personal post-production studios? We will explore this. question through readings, screenings, discussions, field trips, and guest lectures, setting the stage for individual or group projects to be presented at semester’s end. Projects will be limited to whatever you can do on your smartphones, social media platforms, and other everyday-level apps and hardware. No advanced post-production skills required.

    3 credits. One-semester course. Prerequisites: Video II or Film II or Animation II.

  • FA 385B

    AV: Advanced Projects/Installation

    This advanced course investigates video installation as an evolving contemporary art form that extends the conversation of video art beyond the frame and into hybrid media, site-specific, and multiple channel environments. Presentations, screenings, and readings augment critical thinking about temporal and spatial relationships, narrative structure, viewer perception and the challenges of presenting time-based work in a gallery or museum setting. Students will develop research interests and apply their unique skills sets to short turnaround exercises and more expanded self-directed projects for gallery and non-theatrical contexts.

    3 credits. One-semester course. Prerequisites: Video II or Film II or Animation II. Visiting Artist Glen Fogel.

  • FA 479A, FA 479B

    Independent Study in Film

    1-3 credits. Requires approval of instructor and the Dean of the School of Art

  • FA 489A, FA 489B

    Independent Study in Video

    1-3 credits. Requires approval of instructor and the Dean of the School of Art


Drawing

  • FA 240A, FA 240B

    Drawing I

    The course is designed to explore the phenomena of drawing as basic to the visual language of all disciplines. The fundamental notion of observation and analysis in drawing is investigated. As preparation for work in an advanced level, the course involves further development of drawing skills and techniques, as well as an emphasis on individual aesthetic development. Assignments and group critiques are central to the course.

    3 credits per semester. One-semester course. May be repeated once. Prerequisite to all Advanced Drawing. Degen/Hoffman/Merz/Mooses

  • FA 341A, FA 341B

    Advanced Drawing

    Advanced studies in drawing emphasizing the student’s conceptual independence from traditional draftsmanship. This course is for students who have an established direction in drawing.

    3 credits. One-semester course. Barth

  • FA 342A, FA 342B

    Advanced Drawing

    Offered to students working independently in any medium. Must be self-motivated. There will be group and individual critiques.

    3 credits. One-semester course. Lehyt

  • FA 343A, FA 343B

    Advanced Drawing

    Offered to students working independently in any medium. Must be self-motivated. There will be group and individual critiques.

    3 credits. One-semester course. Masnyj

  • FA 345A, FA 345B

    Advanced Drawing

    Offered to students working independently in any medium. Must be self-motivated. There will be group and individual critiques.

    3 credits. One-semester course. Mooses

  • FA 499

    Independent Study in Drawing

    1-3 credits. Requires approval of instructor and the Dean of the School of Art


Contemporary Art Issues

  • SE 401A

    Contemporary Art Issues Seminar. Topic varies

    Theories of the Subject Critical Theory is a school of thought that emerged in the 1930s that interprets society and culture through the lens of philosophy, sociology, psychology and linguistics. It does not offer a theory of art or aesthetics, but its proponents do engage in critique of cultural texts and focus frequently on the workings of visual culture. In this seminar, we will review some of the foundational texts of critical theory and consider multiple theories of the subject. We will read texts by Sigmund Freud, Walter Benjamin, Roland Barthes, Michel Foucault, Stuart Hall and Judith Butler, among others. We will concentrate on the relationship between Critical Theory, aesthetic experience and artistic production. We will also study foundational texts for theoretical analysis of images. The goal of these discussions is to arrive at a more nuanced understanding of who we are and how we see when we imagine, when we create and when we interact with art.

    2 credits. May be repeated once for Art History credit. Fusco


Electives

  • SE 403A, SE 403B

    IntraDisciplinary Seminar

    This course is a hybrid between a lecture series and discussion seminar. It is intended to provide a stimulating and rigorous forum between students’ artistic concerns and those of twelve visiting speakers in a public lecture series of the School of Art. Class discussions will center on diverse presentations by artists, theorists, activists, designers, writers, curators, gallerists and other practitioners involved in the arts from positions that embody an interdisciplinary approach or that imply new uses for disciplinary traditions. Accordingly, the course is designed to introduce students to some of the debates currently driving contemporary art and the larger social context it embodies. Members of the class are expected to be active partici­pants and will therefore be asked to respond with some intellectual invention to a variety of topics with weekly discussions, readings, and written or oral presentations.

    2 credits. Free elective credit. Berrada/Hewitt

  • TE 353

    Papermaking Techniques

    This course includes the making of traditional Western paper from rags to a finished sheet and the making of traditional Oriental paper from tree bark to a finished sheet. Students learn to use a pulp beater, dyes, sizings and a small vacuum table for molding the pulp. Simple binding and box-building techniques as well as marbling are demonstrated.

    2 credits. One-semester course. Free elective credit. Martin


Graphic Design

  • FA 211

    Graphic Design I

    An introduction to the techniques and visual language of graphic design. Weekly projects explore fundamental concepts in form, composition, and typography. Presentations and readings in graphic design history will complement weekly assignments. Students will explore basic imagemaking processes as well as be instructed in digital production techniques.

    3 credits. Fall only. Key/Gasparska/Joel

  • FA 212

    Graphic Design II

    The complex relationship between word and image is explored. The study of semiotics, emphasizing the philosophy of communication, provides a rich historical and intellectual base for experimental projects combining verbal and pictorial information. Weekly projects reflect a broad range of disciplines within the field of design. Computer instruction will be provided as it relates to specific projects.

    3 credits. Spring only. Prerequisite: Graphic Design I. Gasparska/Joel/Key

  • FA 215

    Typography

    Empirical explorations of typographic messages through placement, massing, weight, size and color are analyzed to develop an understanding of aesthetic composition of typographic form and meaning. Legibility, unpredictability and sequencing, as well as the use of grid structures, are investigated. The development of critical judgment about typography is emphasized.

    3 credits. Prerequisite: Graphic Design I. Pre- or corequisite: Graphic Design II. Tochilovsky

  • FA 310

    Information Design

    The visual communication of complex information is introduced through presentations and studio projects that explore organizational structures such as charts, diagrams, maps, illustrations, photographs and typography. Computer instruction will be provided as it relates to specific projects.

    3 credits. Prerequisites: Graphic Design I and II. Pre- or co-requisite: Typography. Cheng/Glauber

  • FA 311

    Publication Design

    The complex issues unique to editorial and publication design are explored through studio projects and presentations that emphasize the grid, effective sequencing and typographic form. Computer instruction will be provided as it relates to specific projects.

    3 credits. Spring only. Prerequisites: Graphic Design I and II. Pre- or corequisite: Typography.

  • FA 312

    Experimental Typography

    This course will emphasize innovation, imagination and creativity in the realm of typography, manipulating it freely as a means of expression. Computer techniques as well as hand drawing, collages and pictures will be used to compose layouts, including posters, limited art books and animated typography for the web. Students will choose a theme and develop it with abstract type expression.

    3 credits. Prerequisite: Graphic Design I and II. Pre- or corequisite:Typography. Famira/Glauber

  • FA 313

    Art of the Book

    In this course the book will be explored as an interdisciplinary medium, placing emphasis on integrating and experimenting with form, content, structure and ideas. During the first half of the semester, students will make a number of books, examining sequence, series and text/image relationships, using various book structures. These “sketches” will prepare students for an extended book project during the second half of the term.

    3 credits.

  • FA 315A

    Advanced Design

    Section I: Type Design

    Section II: Web Design

    Section III: Guest Artist Series

    This course is for students who have a strong commitment to graphic design. Students will create three projects, each presented by a visiting graphic designer. Presentations, readings, and trips to local design studios will support group critiques.

    Prerequisites: Graphic Design II, Typography I

    Credits: 3.00

  • FA 315A, FA 315B

    Advanced Design

    Fall 2020:

    Advanced Design: Archives Tochilovsky

    Can your work be recognized as 'your work' instantly? Is that a good thing? This class will explore how to make use of and come to terms with the intersection of your personal esthetic and the realities of professional problem-solving.

    Advanced Design: Type Design Famira

    In this hands-on class, students will go from the fundamentals of writing and hand-drawn type to contemporary digital type design. By the end of this class every student will have created their own, original digital font.

    3 credits. Prerequisites: Graphic Design II. Pre- or corequisite: Typography.

  • FA 317A, FA 317B

    Advanced Design: Open Studio

    Students will develop a series of personal and unconventional narratives through writing prompts and mix-media studio exercises. The goal is to expand methods and visual techniques when designing or expressing an idea/story. Emphasis will be placed on contemporary graphic design/art practices and developing a personal voice and aesthetic. Visiting lecturers, readings, and individual meetings with the instructor will complement group critiques.

    3 credits. Prerequisites: Graphic Design I and II. Pre- or corequisite: Typography. For Fall 2020: Frank Stanton Chair Helene Silverman

  • FA 326

    Interactive Design Concepts

    An exploration of the nature of interactive design and how it informs and transforms experience. Information structures, navigational issues, design strategies and social implications of interactive experiences using traditional as well as electronic media will be examined.

    3 credits. One-semester course. May not be repeated. Prerequisite: Techniques in HTML and Programming or permission of the instructor. Sparling

  • FA 327

    Advanced Interactive Design Concepts: Computational Media

    An advanced design course in interactive computational media. The course will explore advanced interactive design concepts utilizing software which that includes Processing and Macromedia Flash as well as XHTML coding. Students will complete two fully realized independent projects. Analysis of relevant work and readings support group critiques.

    3 credits. One-semester course. Prerequisite: Interactive Design Concepts.

  • FA 328

    Motion Graphics

    Students will explore the conceptual and technical challenges of design for the television screen. All aspects of industry video/ broadcast production are introduced and integrated into a design core focused on strong communication. Projects include identity design, combining kinetic typography, animation, sound and video. The course includes workshops in After Effects, Final Cut Pro and Protools.

    3 credits. One-semester course. Prerequisites: Graphic Design I and II. Pre- or corequisite: Typography. Vondracek

  • FA 429A, FA 429B

    Independent Study in Graphic Design

    1-3 credits. Requires approval of instructor and the Dean of the School of Art


Painting

  • FA 130A, FA 130B

    Painting

    A studio experience with the physical, compositional and conceptual components of pictorial invention and image-making. Readings, assignments and critiques will enhance the development and articulation of an inventive individual approach to the painting discipline in preparation for advanced level work.

    3 credits per semester. One-year course. Prerequisite to all Advanced Painting courses. Asper/Bluestone/Evans

  • FA 331A, FA 331B

    Advanced Painting

    A seminar course for self-motivated students who are working independently in their studios with a primary focus in drawing and/or painting. In addition to individual studio growth, the course will encourage the development of a critical practice of looking at one’s own work and that of others. Though the emphasis is on individual meetings and working on one’s own, we will meet together at the beginning of each class for discussion of students’ work, current exhibitions, readings, or for slide/video presentations relevant to students’ current projects.

    3 credits. One-semester course. Villalongo

  • FA 334A, FA 334B

    Advanced Painting

    A seminar course for students who have the ability to work independently in their studios with a primary focus in drawing or painting. Students will be expected to develop their ideas and work independently, but the class will meet together every week or two for discussion of each other’s work, as well as various museum and gallery shows, readings or slide presentations of current work. The course will emphasize experimentation and expansion of one’s visual language and process, and the ability to articulate these ideas in discussion.

    3 credits. One-semester course.

  • FA 335A

    Advanced Painting

    In this course, students develop their individual studio work through experimentation, risk taking and rigorous evaluation of how to explore questions of content in their work. Students are encouraged to work through their ideas and relationship to painting to find their own distinct voice and ways of working. The course is centered around individual meetings, with scheduled group critiques for group evaluation and discussion. Supplemental readings, image presentations, discussions, and gallery/museum visits expand the knowledge of the open field of painting today and it’s potential for invention and the production of meaning.

    3 credits. One-semester course. Jessica Dickinson

  • FA 336A, FA 336B

    Advanced Painting

    How does an artist find their voice and sustain it over a lifetime? One answer is to understand art as a process that arises from both the heart and the brain, a kind of machine where these two areas work dynamically together. The aim of this class is to help advanced students achieve a more nimble and trusting artmaking process and a greater degree of critical intelligence. We will try to align production and conversation, bringing language to what you already do instinctually, and meanwhile developing the guts and rigor to investigate other work and ideas that you are not already aligned with, or that may seem outside your area. The goal is the expanded field: to widen, question,

    cross-fertilize, and push your work individually and collectively. The class will include individual studio visits, class critiques, visiting exhibitions, reading and discussing texts by artists writing about their processes.

    3 credits. One-semester course. Fall 2020 Alex Katz Chair Amy Sillman

  • FA 337A, FA 337B

    Advanced Painting

    Students will explore the inner reservoirs of the imagination and investigate, as well, specific external resources for imagery. The course will seek to develop a range of expressive vocabulary including representation and abstraction. Group and individual critiques will be augmented through discussions of museum and gallery exhibitions and slide presentations. Emphasis will be upon developing a personal visual direction.

    3 credits. One-semester course. TBA

  • FA 338A, FA 338B

    Advanced Painting/ Water Media

    Students will focus on water media—acrylic, transparent watercolor and gouache—through work on canvas and paper. The class will explore the specific technical challenges and characteristics inherent in these media including the range from transparency to opacity. Individual approaches will be encouraged in developing the aesthetics of the evolving image from spontaneity to studied expression, from figuration to abstraction. Exposure to selected examples of historical and contemporary imagery will be accomplished through slides, exhibitions and gallery or studio visits.

    3 credits. One-semester course. TBA

  • FA 339A, FA 339B

    Advanced Painting/ Katz Guest Artist Series

    This course is for students who have made a strong commitment to painting. Students are expected to work independently in their studios on a series of paintings that will develop during the semester in response to a dialogue with the different guest artists.

    3 credits. One-semester course. Villalongo/Asper

  • FA 439A, FA 339B

    Independent Study in Painting

    1-3 credits. Requires approval of instructor and the Dean of the School of Art


Performance

  • FA 290

    Elements of Performance

    This course examines the elements that unify the diverse set of practices gathered as “performance art.” Engaging concepts of time, movement, voice, text and body in performance based work, the course addresses both the historical development of performance practices within the field of contemporary art, as well as their current manifestations. Lectures, screenings, readings and discussions support the development of individual and collaborative studio work.

    3 credits. One-semester course. May not be repeated.

  • FA 395

    Performance

    Performance or the live event has been a continuous element of art practice throughout most of the 20th century. The changing technologies of sound and digital recording devices and their increasing availability have enhanced the possibilities of documentation and allowed artists to consider the mediation and documentation of a live event as an integral part of the work itself. In this course, students will examine the interaction between performance and its documentation through practical, historical and theoretical interrogation. The class proposes to address documentation, not as an inadequate representation nor as a nostalgic marker but as something that operates within a distinct system that can become a vital site of art production. This class takes an interdisciplinary approach to making performance work. The medium of performance and its utilization of photography, video and sound will be explored. Students will read and discuss texts, looking at the work of other artists and making their own work.

    3 credits. One semester course. Cohen/Fusco


Photography

  • FA 206

    Lens/Screen/Print I

    LSP I Lens/Screen/Print I is the first section of a two-semester trajectory. This is an immersive foundation course in the practice of photography focusing on a critical engagement with lens technology, color theory/management and combined analog/digital workflows. Topics include: exploratory and technical knowledge of 35mm and medium-format analog cameras, DSLR cameras, lenses and lighting conditions, fluid movement through digital black-and-white and color processes, such as digital imaging editing software, scanning analog color, and digital printing in black-and-white and color. Exposure to critical theory and major philosophical arguments central to lens, screen and print based practices will be explored. This is an assignment driven class.

    3 credits. 4 contact hours. Deschenes/ Westpfahl

  • FA 207

    Lens/Screen/Print II

    Lens/Screen/Print II is the second half of a two-semester trajectory. This course builds upon the foundations of LSP I with an emphasis on post-production and a critical engagement with lens technology, color theory/management and combined analog/digital workflows. Technical knowledge of the tensions and possibilities found between "digital" and "analog" spaces in relation to critical theory and major philosophical arguments central to lens, screen and print based practices will contribute to student development. Topics include advanced digital editing and printing techniques, analog black-and-white production methods, such as shooting with black-and-white film and darkroom printing, advanced medium-format cameras and scanners, as well as introduction to new technologies and modes of display. A distinction in LSP II is a focus on experimentation, articulation and acumen. Students are encouraged to begin to develop semi-autonomous ways of working over the course of the semester, this includes supervised independent or collaborative projects. This course will afford students the opportunity to build a coherent body of work in preparation for advanced study.

    3 credits. Prerequisite: Photo I or Lens/Screen/Print I

  • FA 360

    Photography: Printing Images

    This course will focus on the materiality of the photographic print, both analog and digital. Options in silver-gelatin printing including toning, bleaching and plating, as well as advanced options in digital printing will broaden students’ understanding of the photographic image. Issues involving photographic representation will be addressed through discussions, group and individual critiques, hands-on demonstrations and field trips. Students will produce a finished set of printed images by the end of the semester.

    3 credits. Prerequisite: Photo I.

  • FA 361

    Photography: Topics

    Topic varies. For Fall 2020

    The Constructed Image, Henry Wolf Chair Jennifer Williams

    This studio art course will explore the physical construction of images, relying upon the language and material qualities of photography as their base. The history of collage, montage, composited, staged forms, multiples, and book-as-artform will be discussed. Contemporary artists using these methods will be introduced. Hands-on analog and digital processes, both pre- and post-capture, will be discussed and demonstrated. Individual and group critiques will be supplemented by discussions, readings, presentations, and technical instruction. The final project will focus on the creation of an individual or group book, realized through an online printing service or constructed by hand.

    Art and Ecology, Backström

    This studio class will approach questions around making art with respect to ecological thinking. Ecology will be interpreted as interdependent systems operating on different scales such as the micro, the social, and the cosmic scale, including mental states, human and non-human exchanges, material histories, and global information flows. Through critiques and discussion, the class will explore aesthetics and language to be developed for catastrophic times.

    3 credits. Prerequisite: Photo I. Visiting Artist: Joni Sternbach (Fall 2016)

  • FA 361A

    Advanced Photography: Large Format

    This course focuses on the expanded photographic potentials afforded through the use of large format materials, both analog and digital. Students will explore the ways in which photographs alter and create both architectural and psychological space, become fluent in the techniques of large format analog camerawork, learn advanced printing techniques in the darkroom, and explore the wide range of large format digital printing options. The format of the class will combine lectures, discussions, hands-on demonstrations, and field trips. Students will discuss work in group and individual critiques and the class will culminate with the presentation of a final project.

    3 credits. Prerequisite: Photo I; Ward

  • FA 362A, FA 362B

    Photography: Lighting

    This critique-based studio course explores the use of light on location in photography. Topics explored by this course will include the use and modification of available light as well as the use of portable light sources such as flash (both single and multiple), portable battery powered strobes, remote light triggers and other tools.

    The emphasis of this course will be on using lighting techniques outside the studio in order to gain an understanding of how light effects the way we interpret our world.

    3 credits. Prerequisite: Photo I. Stroh

  • FA 363A, FA 363B

    Photography: Digital Photography

    This studio course focuses on issues related to digital imaging. Students will explore ideas related to digital work as well as techniques such as color management, various corrective measures, and options in digital cameras and printers. Issues central to photography in the digital era will be explored. Students will pursue individual projects that will be discussed in group and individual critiques.

    3 credits. Prerequisite: Photo I.

  • FA 364A/B

    Photography

    This is a project-based seminar which focuses on photography as a discursive practice. We will examine specific questions relevant to photography now (regarding the relation between politics and aesthetics, mediums and mobility, how images can function to both approximate and deny a sense of 'reality'… ) and discuss these issues in relation to each students’ studio objectives. The format of the class will integrate slide presentations, readings, group discussion and critique. Towards the end of semester, students will develop individual proposals and complete a final project. Although there will be an emphasis on strategies and critical theory related to lens-based media, these ideas can be mined to inspire a wide range of practice. Students with different priorities can thrive in this class— from artists who focus on photography to artists who work across different media.

    3 credits. Prerequisite: Photo I.

  • FA 365A/B

    Photography

    This studio based class will explore conceptual topics surrounding current issues such as social justice; the image in the public sphere, and the socio-political landscape. Frequent critiques and discussions will include information on artists relevant to the students’ work as well as provide space to develop technically to support a lens based practice. We will consider how a studio practice in photography develops, this includes considering how traditional wet lab and digital lab processes actually complement and support each other.

    3 credits. Prerequisite: Photo I. Spring only. Hewitt

  • FA 366

    Advanced Photography: Alternate Processes

    A course for students who wish to explore the possibilities of hand-applied photographic emulsions and alternative methods of printing. Processes will include liquid light, cyanotype, palladium, color copier and digital printing options. Student work will be discussed in relation to contemporary art issues.

    3 credits. Prerequisite: Photo I. Williams

  • FA 368A, FA 368B

    Photography: Guest Artist Series

    This course is intended to help students clarify and further the growth of their own work through group and individual critiques, classroom presentations and discussions with contemporary guest artists and the instructor.

    3 credits. Prerequisite: Photo I. Osinski

  • FA 369A

    Photography

    Students will produce work using photographic material(s), camera or any photographic device of their choice. Work will be discussed in group critiques as well as individual conferences with the instructor. Photographic issues and representation will be the subject of reading and class discussions.

    3 credits. Prerequisite: Photo I. Fall only. Raad

  • FA 469A, FA 469B

    Independent Study in Photography

    1-3 credits. Requires approval of instructor and the Dean of the School of Art


Printmaking

  • FA 250

    Silkscreen I

    This course explores screen printing as a means of communication with emphasis on the execution of these images. Students visit museums to learn to appreciate posters from various historical periods. The actual screen printing will be taught with the use of images, type and color. The goal of the course is to combine the components of art, printing and communication.

    3 credits. One-semester course. May not be repeated. LaRocca

  • FA 251

    Lithography I

    An introduction to traditional and contemporary image-making on lithographic stones and commercial aluminum plates, with emphasis on the technical aspect of the medium. The various areas to be examined include stone graining, crayon and tusche drawing, processing, proofing and edition printing procedures, etc.

    3 credits. One-semester course. May not be repeated. Nobles

  • FA 252

    Etching I

    An introduction to etching images on metal plates, through the use of hardground, aquatint softground. The emphasis is on the technical understanding of the medium. Other image-making processes to be covered are drypoint and engraving.

    3 credits. One-semester course. May not be repeated. Ancona

  • FA 253

    Paper: Materiality and Sustainability

    This studio course explores making paper from traditional to contemporary approaches. The course incorporates specified instruction and experimentation driven by student independent projects. The exploration of the structural and historical uses of Western and Eastern methods including contemporary issues of recycled and alternative fibers will frame an understanding of the potential uses and appearances of handmade paper. From a basis in sheet forming, pigmenting, sizing, and the use of additives, the class will move into an emphasis on paper as a visual and sculptural object, covering paper casting and other three-dimensional approaches. 3 credits. 4 contact hours.

    3 credits. One-semester course. May not be repeated. Martin

  • FA 350A, FA 350B

    Silkscreen Workshop

    An advanced workshop in which the students are free to explore screen printing, graphic arts and photography. There will be formal teaching of advanced photographic processes such as halftone and color separation.

    3 credits. One-semester course. Prerequisite: Silkscreen I. Nobles

  • FA 352A, FA 352B

    Etching Workshop

    This course will involve individual directions in etching as well as the development of projects combining print technique and aesthetic goals. The understanding and use of the contemporary professional print shop will be discussed.

    3 credits. One-semester course. Prerequisite: Etching I.

  • FA 354A, FA 354B

    Experimental Printmaking

    The course will supplement the traditional printmaking techniques of etching, lithography and silk screen with an introduction to linoleum woodcut techniques and monoprint/ monotype combination of methods appropriate to developing an aesthetic understanding of the vocabulary of the print. Color, multiple printing, work in series or book formats will be discussed in developing student projects.

    3 credits. One-semester course. Prerequisites: 2 of the following 4 courses: Silkscreen I, Lithography I, Etching I or Papermaking Techniques. Cornejo/Nobles

  • FA 355A, FA 355B

    Relief

    Students will be instructed in various relief printing techniques, including traditional Japanese water-based woodblock and Western techniques with oil-based inks on wood and linoleum. Use of the hydraulic press will allow large format works to be produced. Hand-printing techniques will be taught as well. Small edition printing in multiple colors will be emphasized.

    3 credits. One-semester course. Ancona/Nobles/Shibata

  • FA 459A, FA 459B

    Independent Study in Printmaking

    1-3 credits. Requires approval of instructor and the Dean of the School of Art


Projects

  • FA 384A

    Projects

    This course is open to all third and fourth year students who intend to initiate or pursue a longer term (longer than a semester) art project. Students are expected to present their work-inprogress weekly, to research the works of other artists, writers, and thinkers, and to participate actively in class discussions.

    Open to all 3rd and 4th year students. May be repeated with instructor’s permission. Raad


Science

  • RS 201

    Science

    Topics vary.

    3 general studies credits. Required science course. To be taken during the sophomore, junior or senior year.

  • RS 201a

    Earth Science

    The course will cover a broad range of Earth Science topics including understanding rocks and the stories they tell, the vast scale of geological time, dynamic plate tectonic processes, climate change, and what makes the planet habitable for life. It will inspire wonder and a deep appreciation for the Earth. The course will present to students a different way of looking at the Earth: not as something that is constant and static but rather dynamic and constantly changing, a place with a broad and exciting history of which we are only a small part.

  • RS 201f

    Introduction to Biomaterials

    From the time of cave paintings, artists have been depicting living organisms. But what happens when the art consists of the organism itself or its products? Living material is dynamic by nature, and so the artwork changes with time, perhaps in unpredictable ways. In this class we will explore various biomaterials, including organisms such as bioluminescent plankton and plants that respond to touch, fermentations that create color pigments or cellulose mats, and the DNA that controls it all. The class will be part lecture, part hands-on experience.

  • RS 201g

    Astronomy

    This course begins with an historical overview and then introduces the contemporary understanding of the universe. Students learn about the key elements of the universe, including motion, energy, gravity and light. Topics include; the solar system and its origins; the sun; stellar evolution including white dwarfs, neutron stars, and black holes; galaxies beginning with the structure of the Milky Way; dark matter, dark energy and the Big Bang theory. Labs and field trips to an observatory augment class discussion.

    Grcevich

  • RS 201h

    Science: Physics for Artists

    The course provides an overview of discoveries in physics over the past two millenia, focusing on the development of modern theories. Topics include nature of light and matter, relativity, quantum mechanics, evolution of the universe and the nature of science. Knowledge of basic algebra is assumed. Field trips and computer lab assignments are included in the syllabus.

    3 credits. One-semester. Kreis

  • RS 201i

    Science, Technology and Societal Impact

    This course explores the ramifications of the latest scientific discoveries and technological breakthroughs. How will they affect our lives and the planet? What social, moral, and ethical questions have inspired artists to use them in their work? Each class will focus on a different scientific discipline such as genetic engineering, cognitive neuroscience, tissue engineering, synthetic biology, and personal genomics. An explanation of the science will be followed by a discussion examining the utopic/ dystopic myths surrounding these technologies, fact vs. hype, and what questions should be raised as we implement them. Guest artists and their work will be featured along with scientists and ethicists.

  • RS 201j

    The Climate System

    The Earth’s climate system is complex and dynamic, and a solid understanding of this system is crucial in order to address concerns about human influences on climate. In this course we examine the basic physical and chemical processes that control the modern climate system, including the role of incoming solar radiation, the greenhouse effect, ocean and atmospheric circulation, and El Niño. We also look at the methods and archives used to reconstruct climate in the past. We explore the possible effects of greenhouse gas emissions caused by humans on modern and future climate by examining the models used in climate prediction, and discuss the challenges of modeling such a complex system. Although this course is taught from a primarily scientific perspective, it includes discussions of the roles policy and economics play in the current dialogue on global climate change. Finally, we look at some of the local impacts of climate change and preparedness planning for New York City.

  • RS 201m

    Ecology

    Ecology is the study how organisms interact with other organisms and their environments. The field tackles a broad set of questions. How do prey populations respond to predators? How do aquatic systems differ from those on land? What happens when additional nutrients are introduced to a habitat? Understanding the fundamentals of ecology is ever more important: ecosystems are regularly degraded and many species are at risk of extinction due to climate change, legal rollbacks of environmental law, and consumptive human practices. However, individuals, conservation organizations, and politicians can better solve these problems by understanding ecological principles. In this course, we will jointly explore the science of ecology with biological conservation, considering current and local ecologies and issues. To gain deeper knowledge in these subject areas, we will become familiar with both scientific background and current events. To enrich our perspectives, we will have regular discussions on ecology, conservation, and how it all relates to us. To gain local context, we will take field trips within the NYC to learn about city ecology and conservation.

  • RS01n

    Evolution

    Evolution is one of the most fundamental concepts for understanding life on Earth. The field of evolution allows us to ask important questions like: How are humans related to fish or bacteria? Why are some animals brightly colored while others are drab? How can something complex like flight evolve separately in birds, bats, and insects? In this class we will learn to answer questions like these, and many others. We will examine tools used to understand evolution in deep time and take field trips to see the organisms that live around us, while learning about evolution in the city.

    Tessler


Sculpture

  • FA 391A, FA 391B

    Sculpture

    This course helps students develop projects related to their own vision and ideas. Class discussions address the full range of conceptual and material processes that generate production. Research and development will be given equal weight to finished work. Intention, form, materiality and context will be analyzed against larger questions of culture in relation to artistic practice. Student work will be reviewed by the entire class and by the instructor on an individual basis. Lectures, readings and field trips will complement studio critiques.

    3 credits. One-semester course. Adams

  • FA 392A, FA 392B

    Sculpture

    Fall 2020: Art and Ecology

    This studio class will approach questions around making art with respect to ecological thinking. Ecology will be interpreted as interdependent systems operating on different scales such as the micro, the social, and the cosmic scale, including mental states, human and non-human exchanges, material histories, and global information flows. Through critiques and discussion, the class will explore aesthetics and language to be developed for catastrophic times.

    3 credits. One-semester course. Backström

  • FA 393A, FA 393B

    Sculpture

    This course helps students explore and develop their personal process of making art, with an emphasis on sculpture. Formal and material choices will be discussed in relation to intention, meaning, context, and contemporary culture. Research and development are given equal weight to finished work. Students will discuss their process individually with the instructor, and present work for review to the entire class. In-class slide presentations, readings, and field trips will complement class discussions.

    3 credits. One-semester course. Lehyt/Mooses

    Credits: 3.00

  • FA 394A, FA 394B

    Sculpture

    This course takes a concrete approach to the development of critical discourse about works of art. It exercises the student’s ability to analyze the activity of making sculpture in particular and advances the student’s understanding of how to proceed in the studio. Problems of structure, materials, meaning, intention and context are the subject of class discussion.

    3 credits. One-semester course. Farmiga

  • FA 397A, FA 397B

    Sculpture

    This course takes a concrete approach to the development of critical discourse about works of art. It exercises the student’s ability to analyze the activity of making sculpture in particular and advances the student’s understanding of how to proceed in the studio. Problems of structure, materials, meaning, intention and context are the subject of class discussion.

    3 credits. One-semester. Ashford

  • FA 398A, FA 398B

    Sculpture

    This course helps students develop projects related to their own vision and ideas. Class discussions address the full range of conceptual and material processes that generate production. Research and development will be given equal weight to finished work. Intention, form, materiality and context will be analyzed against larger questions of culture in relation to artistic practice. Student work will be reviewed by the entire class and by the instructor on an individual basis. Lectures, readings and field trips will complement studio critiques.

    3 credits. One-semester. Magid/Raven

  • FA 499A, FA 499B

    Independent Study in Sculpture

    1-3 credits. Requires approval of instructor and the Dean of the School of Art

  • TE 390

    Casting Techniques

    Casting Techniques is a process intensive course covering the methods of translating a wax positive into bronze or other non-ferrous metals. All associated techniques from beginning a plaster or rubber mold to casting, chasing, finishing and patination of metal sculptures will be covered. Students will explore a variety of approaches to casting, as well as engage in discussions involving the history of bronze casting, and its place in contemporary art.

    2 credits. One-semester course. May not be repeated. Free elective credit. Wilhelm

    Credits: 2.00


Sound Art

  • FA 281

    Project in Sound Art

    This class will introduce strategies for understanding and participating in the aural world. The course is divided into specific weekly topics, including acoustic ecology, circuit-bending, radio transmission, synaesthesia and others. Screenings, readings and discussion are supported by hands-on workshops in capturing, manipulating and reproducing sound in unconventional ways. Grading is based on three student projects and participation in class discussions.

    3 credits. One-semester course. May not be repeated. Poff


Practicum

  • FA 301

    Teaching as Collaborative Social Practice

    As a practicum, this course invites students to actively explore the evolving role of the artist engaged in teaching as an art practice. The aim is to help the undergraduate who is currently teaching or who has interest in teaching in The Saturday Program. Through the course students will begin to frame pointed questions, such as: What is art? What is architecture? What constitutes community? What kind of societal questions can art/architecture raise while still being art/architecture? How can human interaction be seen and understood as a work of art or as architecture? Introductions to artists, art collectives and institutions that hold varied approaches to the notion of community, education, social discourse and positionality will also be essential to the learning environment.

    3 credits. Olivera

  • Founded by inventor, industrialist and philanthropist Peter Cooper in 1859, The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art offers education in art, architecture and engineering, as well as courses in the humanities and social sciences.

  • “My feelings, my desires, my hopes, embrace humanity throughout the world,” Peter Cooper proclaimed in a speech in 1853. He looked forward to a time when, “knowledge shall cover the earth as waters cover the great deep.”

  • From its beginnings, Cooper Union was a unique institution, dedicated to founder Peter Cooper's proposition that education is the key not only to personal prosperity but to civic virtue and harmony.

  • Peter Cooper wanted his graduates to acquire the technical mastery and entrepreneurial skills, enrich their intellects and spark their creativity, and develop a sense of social justice that would translate into action.