Martin Finio AR'88 Receives American Academy of Arts and Letters Award in Architecture

March 24, 2014

Taryn Christoff and Martin Finio of Christoff:Finio. Images courtesy of Christoff:Finio 'Museum as Hub' at the New Museum of Contemporary Art, New York City, 2006. Photo by Christopher Lovi Carriage House, New York City, 2009. Photo by Jan Staller The Heckscher Foundation for Children, New York City, 2009. Photo by Burnett / Herndon
Taryn Christoff and Martin Finio of Christoff:Finio. Images courtesy of Christoff:Finio

Martin Finio AR'88 and Taryn Christoff, co-founders of Christoff:Finio, have received a 2014 Arts and Letters Award in Architecture from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. The award recognizes, "American architects whose work is characterized by a strong personal direction."

Billie Tsien, a member of the selection committee and co-founder of Tod Williams Billie Tsien Architects, described the work of Christoff:Finio as having, "a quiet intelligence that manifests itself in spaces that are both beautiful and humane. There is a balance between the exquisite control of their finely tuned details and the whoop of joy that comes when one discovers their subtle inventions. It is like watching a prima ballerina—all is in equilibrium and then she leaps.”

The Arts and Letters selection committed took special note projects by Christoff:Finio including the Donghia Materials Study Center at Parsons New School for Design, New York City, 2003; the “Museum as Hub” initiative at the New Museum of Contemporary Art, New York City, 2006; the Heckscher Foundation for Children, New York City, 2009; the Carriage House, New York City, 2009; Sagaponack Barns, NY, 2012; and Venice Architectural Biennial, 2012. Their work has received numerous Honor Awards from The American Institute of Architects.

This year's selection committee included Henry Cobb, Elizabeth Diller AR'79, Michael Graves, Hugh Hardy, Steven Holl, Richard Meier (chairman) Cesar Pelli, James Polshek, Robert A.M. Stern, Billie Tsien and Tod Williams.

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