Freedom of Information Act Workshop

Thursday, November 06, 2014, 4:00pm

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The Clandestine Reading Room (installation view) by Dolsy and Kant Smith A'07, 2014

The Clandestine Reading Room (installation view) by Dolsy and Kant Smith A'07, 2014

The FOIA workshop, led by FOIA expert Nate Jones of the National Security Archive in Washington, DC, will introduce the Freedom of Information Act as a tool for research. The history of FOIA is studded with startling revelations, from the extent of the FBI's counterintelligence activities against activists and others, to the involvement of the CIA in foreign insurgencies and military coups. But FOIA has been used by historians, activists, and others to throw back the veil not only on abuses of power, but more generally, on important matters of historical fact that would have otherwise remained hidden from public knowledge. Artists and others interested in twentieth-century history, politics, activism, social movements, etc., will benefit from a greater appreciation of the methods and scope of FOIA. This workshop is a rare opportunity for many journalists and lawyers, much less the general public; however we are reserving a number of RSVPs for Cooper Union students. Students should reserve a seat through this website.

Located at 41 Cooper Square, on Third Avenue between 6th and 7th Streets.

  • Founded by inventor, industrialist and philanthropist Peter Cooper in 1859, The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art offers education in art, architecture and engineering, as well as courses in the humanities and social sciences.

  • “My feelings, my desires, my hopes, embrace humanity throughout the world,” Peter Cooper proclaimed in a speech in 1853. He looked forward to a time when, “knowledge shall cover the earth as waters cover the great deep.”

  • From its beginnings, Cooper Union was a unique institution, dedicated to founder Peter Cooper's proposition that education is the key not only to personal prosperity but to civic virtue and harmony.

  • Peter Cooper wanted his graduates to acquire the technical mastery and entrepreneurial skills, enrich their intellects and spark their creativity, and develop a sense of social justice that would translate into action.