Concept and Notation: Lecture by Bernard Tschumi

Monday, November 24, 2014 7:00 - 9:00pm

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Bernard Tschumi Architects, Alésia MuséoParc | photo by Christian Richters Bernard Tschumi Architects, Le Parc Zoologique de Paris | photo by Iwan Baan
Bernard Tschumi Architects, Alésia MuséoParc | photo by Christian Richters

This lecture is co-sponsored by the Architectural League of New York

Bernard Tschumi’s buildings and theoretical writings have significantly influenced architectural form and discourse for over forty years. A recent comprehensive retrospective of his work at the Pompidou Centre, Paris, provided visitors with a visual, documentary, and experiential survey of his practice. Tschumi’s design for the exhibition reflects his approach to understanding architecture, as he describes in the catalogue Architecture: Concept & Notation, “the art of inventing concepts in space through materials.”

Bernard Tschumi founded his practice in 1983 in Paris after winning the Parc de La Villette competition, his first major commission. He opened Bernard Tschumi Architects based in New York City in 1988, and Bernard Tschumi urbanistes Architectes based in Paris in 2002. Notable works include the New Acropolis Museum, Athens; as well as Le Fresnoy Center for the Contemporary Arts, Tourcoing, France; and the Limoges Concert Hall, Limoges, France. Current work includes Carnal Hall, at Le Rosey, the Swiss boarding school, as well as the Muséoparc Alésia, Alise-Sainte-Reine, France, and the Paris Zoo. Other current projects include the Vacheron Constantin Headquarters addition, Geneva, and the New Hague Passage, The Hague.

Moderated by Barry Bergdoll, the Meyer Schapiro Professor of Art History and Archaeology at Columbia University and Curator in the Department of Architecture and Design, MoMA.

Free to current Cooper Union students/faculty/staff and League members; non-members may purchase tickets here

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