Course Listings


Foundation

Foundation courses are required of all first year students.

  • FA 100.1, FA 100.2

    Introduction to Techniques

    An introduction to the physical aspects of working with wood, metal, plaster - and plastics, as well as an introduction to on-campus computer facilities and resources. A basic introduction to the Adobe interface, specifically Photoshop and Illustrator will be provided.

    Required for first year students. 1/2 credit per semester. One-year course. Pass/Fail. Staff

  • FA 101

    Color

    A study of the physical, perceptual, art historical and cultural aspects of color. The phenomenon of color and principles of light are explored in various media towards an understanding of color application in all of the fine art disciplines and architecture.

    Required for first year students. 2 credits. Fall only. Backström/Jones/Hewitt/Osinski

  • FA 102.1 FA 102.2

    Two-Dimensional Design

    Exploration of the visual and intellectual aspects of form on the two-dimensional surface, in a variety of media. Investigations into the relationships of perception, process and presentation.

    Required for first year students. 3 credits per semester. One-year course. Harris/Raad/Rub/Waters

  • FA 104.1, FA 104.2

    Basic Drawing (Analytical and Descriptive)

    A course in freehand drawing designed to emphasize perceptual and inventive skills in all drawing media.

    Required for first year students. 3 credits per semester. One-year course. Brown/Hoffman/Masnyj/Robinson

  • FA 105

    Four-Dimensional Design

    This course investigates the properties of time and movement and the fundamentals of four-dimensional design. Students explore duration, condensation, expansion, interruption, simultaneity, stillness, action and situation through a wide range of materials.

    Required for first year students. 3 credits. Spring only. Burkhardt/Lehyt/Raad/Raven

  • FA 109.1, FA 109.2

    Three-Dimensional Design

    Students work on projects that explore the fundamentals of forms and space and investigate the properties of materials, structure, mass, scale, light and motion.

    Required for first year students. 3 credits per semester. One-year course. Ashfords/Cetera/Imber/Schrader

  • SE 150

    Foundation Project

    A course that brings together all Foundation year students around a series of presentations that introduce various artistic practices, critical languages, and criticism. The course intends to present contrasting historical and contemporary models of creating, seeing, speaking and thinking about art.

    Required for first year students. 1 credit. Raad/Bordo


Calligraphy

  • FA 419

    Independent Study in Calligraphy

    1-3 credits. Requires approval of instructor and the Dean of the School of Art.

  • TE 216

    Calligraphy

    Geometry, optical balance and the stroke of the broad-edge pen are primary influences that shape the Roman alphabet. Students learn the fundamentals of “beautiful writing” through the study of historical models and the principles that are the basis of classical and modern letterforms. Exercises in ink train the hand kinaesthetically to write letters with graceful movement. Exercises in pencil train the eye to see and analyze the subtle geometry and skeletal “ideal” form of letters. Precise rhythm in letterspacing and careful line-spacing create the color and texture of the page. The class will have an emphasis on page design involving hand written compositions. Roman and Italic capitals and small letters will be the focus of first semester students. Those who repeat may be introduced to other historical hands.

    2 credits. One-semester course. May be repeated once. Free elective credit. DiEdwardo


Computer Techniques

  • TE 303

    Techniques in Photoshop

    This course explores techniques and projects in Photoshop. Students will complete projects that demonstrate their skill and understanding of digital image creation. Students will apply the software to projects that they are engaged in or planning. A structured series of projects/problems will be presented to help students master the various techniques and tools as well as the application of the software to real world situations.

    One-semester course. Cannot be repeated. Free elective credit.

  • TE 304

    Techniques in After Effects

    This course explores techniques and projects in Adobe After Effects. Students will complete projects that demonstrate their skill and understanding of visual effects and motion graphics. Projects will be faculty and student generated.

    2 credits. One-semester course. Cannot be repeated. Free elective credit. McWreath

  • TE 305

    Techniques in HTML and Programming

    This course explores programming techniques using HTML, CSS, Javascript and other data formats. Students will complete projects that demonstrate their skill and understanding of building web sites and basic programming. The purpose of this course is for the student to develop the skills necessary to utilize the many and varied web technologies for their artistic and professional practices.

    2 credits. One-semester course. Cannot be repeated. Free elective credit. Bailey


Drawing

  • FA 240A, FA 240B

    Drawing I

    The course is designed to explore the phenomena of drawing as basic to the visual language of all disciplines. The fundamental notion of observation and analysis in drawing is investigated. As preparation for work in an advanced level, the course involves further development of drawing skills and techniques, as well as an emphasis on individual aesthetic development. Assignments and group critiques are central to the course.

    3 credits per semester. One-semester course. May be repeated once. Prerequisite to all Advanced Drawing. Cornejo/ Degen/ Merz/ Mooses

  • FA 341A, FA 341B

    Advanced Drawing

    Advanced studies in drawing emphasizing the student’s conceptual independence from traditional draftsmanship. This course is for students who have an established direction in drawing.

    3 credits. One-semester course. Barth

  • FA 342A, FA 342B

    Advanced Drawing

    Offered to students working independently in any medium. Must be self-motivated. There will be group and individual critiques.

    3 credits. One-semester course. Lehyt

  • FA 343A, FA 343B

    Advanced Drawing

    Offered to students working independently in any medium. Must be self-motivated. There will be group and individual critiques.

    3 credits. One-semester course. Masnyj

  • FA 345A, FA 345B

    Advanced Drawing

    Offered to students working independently in any medium. Must be self-motivated. There will be group and individual critiques.

    3 credits. One-semester course. Segre

  • FA 499

    Independent Study in Drawing

    1-3 credits. Requires approval of instructor and the Dean of the School of Art


Electives

  • SE 403A, SE 403B

    IntraDisciplinary Seminar

    This course is a hybrid between a lecture series and discussion seminar. It is intended to provide a stimulating and rigorous forum between students’ artistic concerns and those of twelve visiting speakers in a public lecture series of the School of Art. Class discussions will center on diverse presentations by artists, theorists, activists, designers, writers, curators, gallerists and other practitioners involved in the arts from positions that embody an interdisciplinary approach or that imply new uses for disciplinary traditions. Accordingly, the course is designed to introduce students to some of the debates currently driving contemporary art and the larger social context it embodies. Members of the class are expected to be active partici­pants and will therefore be asked to respond with some intellectual invention to a variety of topics with weekly discussions, readings, and written or oral presentations.

    2 credits. Free elective credit. Berrada&Hewitt

  • TE 353

    Papermaking Techniques

    This course includes the making of traditional Western paper from rags to a finished sheet and the making of traditional Oriental paper from tree bark to a finished sheet. Students learn to use a pulp beater, dyes, sizings and a small vacuum table for molding the pulp. Simple binding and box-building techniques as well as marbling are demonstrated.

    2 credits. One-semester course. Free elective credit. Martin


Film/Video

  • FA 272

    Film Workshop

    This introduction to 16 mm filmmaking covers a wide range of techniques such as shooting with the reflex Bolex, lighting, single-frame construction, sound and editing. Students learn16mm filmmaking with hands-on experience and are encouraged to use the unique qualities of the medium to express their original visions. This course integrates theory and analysis of cinematic language with film practice. Films made by independent filmmakers and artists will be screened and discussed and advanced filmmaking techniques such as optical printing and multiple-exposure will be taught. Critiques of student work will take place at various points during the semester and students are required to complete their own final 16mm sound film by the end of the course.

    3 credits. One-semester course. May not be repeated. Perlin

  • FA 275

    Audiovisual I

    An introduction to concepts, production techniques, and histories of artists moving image work. Over two semesters, students will investigate the origins and evolution of animation, film, video, and sound recording for cinema, with classroom instruction and experimentation in the techniques and production of each. Alongside a historical and theoretical framework, a wide range of practical tools will be introduced, including precinematic image capture, 16mm film and digital cinema production, stop action animation, sound recording, and lighting.

    3 credits. One-semester course. May not be repeated. Raven.

  • FA 276

    Audiovisual II

    3 credits. One-semester course. Prerequisite: Audiovisual I. Jugdeo/McWreath.

  • FA 376

    Animation Workshop

    An advanced course in frame by frame film making. An examination of existing work in the field will accompany the development of independent projects, ranging from traditional cartoon animation to fine art-based experimentation. Films begun in Animation I can be carried to completion in this course. Techniques can vary from simple index card animation to elaborate combinations of cel and rotoscope. The relationship of sound to image will be explored and sound tracks produced. Individual projects will be completed on 16mm film with the option to transfer final work to video

    Prerequisite: AV I.

  • FA 385A

    AV Projects

    Section I -- Dynamic Range
    This course is organized around individual student-driven works in relation to three invited guest artists/ filmmakers, each of whom will be with us for three weeks. Dynamic range in cinema is used to refer to the difference between the darkest and lightest tones in an image—ostensibly pure black to pure white. These two absolute values are fugitive in most moving images, and the range between them can be affected by many factors— technological, phenomenological, historical, any many still to be explored. Throughout the semester, our readings, guest visits, discussions, and screenings will examine, break down, and at times, reform the ideologies underpinning those values that define dynamic range.

    Section II -- Guest Artist Series: Bill Morrison. Discovered Footage
    If all recordings in some way embody human thought, the moving image, accompanied by sound, is the perhaps best approximation of our consciousness. By extension, the storage of the moving image is a model of human memory taken to a societal level – a collective memory. Students will be encouraged to find existing media that in some way is in dialogue with their experience as sentient beings in the real world today. This can take many forms. They can source physical, analog films, or download digital imagery via the internet. They can access their family’s archives. They can seek out lost or “forgotten” moving images, and try to discover how it came to be marginalized, and what their role is in uncovering it anew. Each student is encouraged to evaluate their own history - personal, familial, cultural, political, or other – and to arrive as a way of reconciling that history with the world that they live in today.

    Section IV -- Visiting Artist Paul Pfeiffer
    Advanced projects class in audio-video post-production and the everyday. This class will explore the digital post-production studio as a space defining the limits of contemporary society and individual experience, technologically and ontologically. How are the handheld devices and apps we use daily like personal post-production studios? We will explore this. question through readings, screenings, discussions, field trips, and guest lectures, setting the stage for individual or group projects to be presented at semester’s end. Projects will be limited to whatever you can do on your smartphones, social media platforms, and other everyday-level apps and hardware. No advanced post-production skills required.

    3 credits. One-semester course. Prerequisites: Video II or Film II or Animation II.

  • FA 479A, FA 479B

    Independent Study in Film

    1-3 credits. Requires approval of instructor and the Dean of the School of Art

  • FA 489A, FA 489B

    Independent Study in Video

    1-3 credits. Requires approval of instructor and the Dean of the School of Art


Graphic Design

  • FA 211

    Graphic Design I

    An introduction to the techniques and visual language of graphic design. Weekly projects explore fundamental concepts in form, composition, and typography. Presentations and readings in graphic design history will complement weekly assignments. Students will explore basic imagemaking processes as well as be instructed in digital production techniques.

    3 credits. Fall only. Key/Gasparska/Joel

  • FA 212

    Graphic Design II

    The complex relationship between word and image is explored. The study of semiotics, emphasizing the philosophy of communication, provides a rich historical and intellectual base for experimental projects combining verbal and pictorial information. Weekly projects reflect a broad range of disciplines within the field of design. Computer instruction will be provided as it relates to specific projects.

    3 credits. Spring only. Prerequisite: Graphic Design I. Essl/Gasparska

  • FA 215

    Typography

    Empirical explorations of typographic messages through placement, massing, weight, size and color are analyzed to develop an understanding of aesthetic composition of typographic form and meaning. Legibility, unpredictability and sequencing, as well as the use of grid structures, are investigated. The development of critical judgment about typography is emphasized.

    3 credits. Prerequisite: Graphic Design I. Pre- or corequisite: Graphic Design II. Tochilovsky

  • FA 310

    Information Design

    The visual communication of complex information is introduced through presentations and studio projects that explore organizational structures such as charts, diagrams, maps, illustrations, photographs and typography. Computer instruction will be provided as it relates to specific projects.

    3 credits. Prerequisites: Graphic Design I and II. Pre- or co-requisite: Typography. Cheng

  • FA 315A

    Advanced Design

    Section I: Type Design

    Section II: Web Design

    Section III: Guest Artist Series

    This course is for students who have a strong commitment to graphic design. Students will create three projects, each presented by a visiting graphic designer. Presentations, readings, and trips to local design studios will support group critiques.

    Prerequisites: Graphic Design II, Typography I.

  • FA 327

    Advanced Interactive Design Concepts: Computational Media

    An advanced design course in interactive computational media. The course will explore advanced interactive design concepts utilizing software which that includes Processing and Macromedia Flash as well as XHTML coding. Students will complete two fully realized independent projects. Analysis of relevant work and readings support group critiques.

    3 credits. One-semester course. Prerequisite: Interactive Design Concepts. Kendall

  • FA 328

    Motion Graphics

    Students will explore the conceptual and technical challenges of design for the television screen. All aspects of industry video/ broadcast production are introduced and integrated into a design core focused on strong communication. Projects include identity design, combining kinetic typography, animation, sound and video. The course includes workshops in After Effects, Final Cut Pro and Protools.

    3 credits. One-semester course. Prerequisites: Graphic Design I and II. Pre- or corequisite: Typography. Vondracek

  • FA 429A, FA 429B

    Independent Study in Graphic Design

    1-3 credits. Requires approval of instructor and the Dean of the School of Art

  • SE 403A, SE 403B

    Interdisciplinary Seminar

    This course is a hybrid between a lecture series and discussion seminar. It is intended to provide a stimulating and rigorous forum between students’ artistic concerns and those of twelve visiting speakers in a public lecture series of the School of Art. Class discussions will center on diverse presentations by artists, theorists, activists, designers, writers, curators, gallerists and other practitioners involved in the arts from positions that embody an interdisciplinary approach or that imply new uses for disciplinary traditions. Accordingly, the course is designed to introduce students to some of the debates currently driving contemporary art and the larger social context it embodies. Members of the class are expected to be active participants and will therefore be asked to respond with some intellectual invention to a variety of topics with weekly discussions, readings, and written or oral presentations.

    2 credits. Free elective credit. Cameron


Painting

  • FA 130A, FA 130B

    Painting

    A studio experience with the physical, compositional and conceptual components of pictorial invention and image-making. Readings, assignments and critiques will enhance the development and articulation of an inventive individual approach to the painting discipline in preparation for advanced level work.

    3 credits per semester. One-year course. Prerequisite to all Advanced Painting courses. Asper/Evans/Krashes

  • FA 331A, FA 331B

    Advanced Painting

    A seminar course for students who have the ability to work independently in their studios with a primary focus in drawing or painting. Students will be expected to develop their ideas and work independently, but the class will meet together every week or two for discussion of each other’s work, as well as various museum and gallery shows, readings or slide presentations of current work. The course will emphasize experimentation and expansion of one’s visual language and process, and the ability to articulate these ideas in discussion.

    3 credits. One-semester course. Rivero

  • FA 334A, FA 334B

    Advanced Painting

    A seminar course for students who have the ability to work independently in their studios with a primary focus in drawing or painting. Students will be expected to develop their ideas and work independently, but the class will meet together every week or two for discussion of each other’s work, as well as various museum and gallery shows, readings or slide presentations of current work. The course will emphasize experimentation and expansion of one’s visual language and process, and the ability to articulate these ideas in discussion.

    3 credits. One-semester course. Bordo

  • FA 335A

    Advanced Painting

    In this course, students develop their individual studio work through experimentation, risk taking and rigorous evaluation of how to explore questions of content in their work. Students are encouraged to work through their ideas and relationship to painting to find their own distinct voice and ways of working. The course is centered around individual meetings, with scheduled group critiques for group evaluation and discussion. Supplemental readings, image presentations, discussions, and gallery/museum visits expand the knowledge of the open field of painting today and it’s potential for invention and the production of meaning.

    3 credits. One-semester course. Jessica Dickinson

  • FA 337A, FA 337B

    Advanced Painting

    Students will explore the inner reservoirs of the imagination and investigate, as well, specific external resources for imagery. The course will seek to develop a range of expressive vocabulary including representation and abstraction. Group and individual critiques will be augmented through discussions of museum and gallery exhibitions and slide presentations. Emphasis will be upon developing a personal visual direction.

    3 credits. One-semester course. TBA

  • FA 339A, FA 339B

    Advanced Painting/ Guest Artist Series

    This course is for students who have made a strong commitment to painting. Students are expected to work independently in their studios on a series of paintings that will develop during the semester in response to a dialogue with the different guest artists.

    3 credits. One-semester course. Villalongo

  • FA 439A, FA 339B

    Independent Study in Painting

    1-3 credits. Requires approval of instructor and the Dean of the School of Art


Performance

  • FA 395

    Performance

    Performance or the live event has been a continuous element of art practice throughout most of the 20th century. The changing technologies of sound and digital recording devices and their increasing availability have enhanced the possibilities of documentation and allowed artists to consider the mediation and documentation of a live event as an integral part of the work itself. In this course, students will examine the interaction between performance and its documentation through practical, historical and theoretical interrogation. The class proposes to address documentation, not as an inadequate representation nor as a nostalgic marker but as something that operates within a distinct system that can become a vital site of art production. This class takes an interdisciplinary approach to making performance work. The medium of performance and its utilization of photography, video and sound will be explored. Students will read and discuss texts, looking at the work of other artists and making their own work.

    3 credits. One semester course. Cohen/Fusco


Photography

  • FA 106

    Photography I

    The objective of this course is to provide foundational skills in both analog and digital photography. Students will gain hands-on experience in using 35mm and DSLR cameras, developing and printing in black and white darkroom, using digital editing softwares such as Photoshop and Lightroom, and printing quality ink-jet prints. In addition to technical lectures and assignments reviews, there will be a selection of reading assignments regarding the visual cultural and the theoretical discourse on photography. The class time will be spent on lectures, discussion of reading assignments, discussion of student work, printing in darkroom and digital lab, and technical demonstrations.

    *It is recommended that students have digital cameras. Instructors will make camera recommendations on the first day of class for those students who may wish to purchase one. 3 credits. One-semester only. May not be repeated. Westpfahl/Oliver

  • FA 361A

    Advanced Photography: Large Format

    This course focuses on the expanded photographic potentials afforded through the use of large format materials, both analog and digital. Students will explore the ways in which photographs alter and create both architectural and psychological space, become fluent in the techniques of large format analog camerawork, learn advanced printing techniques in the darkroom, and explore the wide range of large format digital printing options. The format of the class will combine lectures, discussions, hands-on demonstrations, and field trips. Students will discuss work in group and individual critiques and the class will culminate with the presentation of a final project.

    3 credits. Prerequisite: Photo I; Ward

  • FA 364A

    Advanced Photography

    This is a project-based seminar which focuses on photography as a discursive practice. We will examine specific questions relevant to photography now (regarding the relation between politics and aesthetics, mediums and mobility, how images can function to both approximate and deny a sense of 'reality'… ) and discuss these issues in relation to each students’ studio objectives. The format of the class will integrate slide presentations, readings, group discussion and critique. Towards the end of semester, students will develop individual proposals and complete a final project. Although there will be an emphasis on strategies and critical theory related to lens-based media, these ideas can be mined to inspire a wide range of practice. Students with different priorities can thrive in this class— from artists who focus on photography to artists who work across different media.

    3 credits. Prerequisite: Photo I. Henry Wolf Chair Liz Deschnes (Fall 2019)

  • FA 366

    Advanced Photography: Alternate Processes

    A course for students who wish to explore the possibilities of hand-applied photographic emulsions and alternative methods of printing. Processes will include liquid light, cyanotype, palladium, color copier and digital printing options. Student work will be discussed in relation to contemporary art issues.

    3 credits. Prerequisite: Photo I. Williams

  • FA 469A, FA 469B

    Independent Study in Photography

    1-3 credits. Requires approval of instructor and the Dean of the School of Art


Printmaking

  • FA 250

    Silkscreen I

    This course explores screen printing as a means of communication with emphasis on the execution of these images. Students visit museums to learn to appreciate posters from various historical periods. The actual screen printing will be taught with the use of images, type and color. The goal of the course is to combine the components of art, printing and communication.

    3 credits. One-semester course. May not be repeated. LaRocca/Clayton

  • FA 251

    Lithography I

    An introduction to traditional and contemporary image-making on lithographic stones and commercial aluminum plates, with emphasis on the technical aspect of the medium. The various areas to be examined include stone graining, crayon and tusche drawing, processing, proofing and edition printing procedures, etc.

    3 credits. One-semester course. May not be repeated. Nobles

  • FA 252

    Etching I

    An introduction to etching images on metal plates, through the use of hardground, aquatint softground. The emphasis is on the technical understanding of the medium. Other image-making processes to be covered are drypoint and engraving.

    3 credits. One-semester course. May not be repeated. Ancona

  • FA 350A, FA 350B

    Silkscreen Workshop

    An advanced workshop in which the students are free to explore screen printing, graphic arts and photography. There will be formal teaching of advanced photographic processes such as halftone and color separation.

    3 credits. One-semester course. Prerequisite: Silkscreen I. Clayton (leave of absence Fall 2016) / Nobles

  • FA 354A, FA 354B

    Experimental Printmaking

    The course will supplement the traditional printmaking techniques of etching, lithography and silk screen with an introduction to linoleum woodcut techniques and monoprint/ monotype combination of methods appropriate to developing an aesthetic understanding of the vocabulary of the print. Color, multiple printing, work in series or book formats will be discussed in developing student projects.

    3 credits. One-semester course. Prerequisites: 2 of the following 4 courses: Silkscreen I, Lithography I, Etching I or Papermaking Techniques. Gleeson/Nobles/Powell

  • FA 355A, FA 355B

    Relief

    Students will be instructed in various relief printing techniques, including traditional Japanese water-based woodblock and Western techniques with oil-based inks on wood and linoleum. Use of the hydraulic press will allow large format works to be produced. Hand-printing techniques will be taught as well. Small edition printing in multiple colors will be emphasized.

    3 credits. One-semester course. Shibata

  • FA 459A, FA 459B

    Independent Study in Printmaking

    1-3 credits. Requires approval of instructor and the Dean of the School of Art


Projects

  • FA 384 A

    Projects: Technics

    This class will introduce students to tools and technologies that are reshaping what artists produce and how audiences engage. This course begins with a consideration of technics, or a knowledge of technical forms and systems that aid and augment human creative production in the 21st century. These processes accordingly frame and filter our perceptions of the world and what gets bracketed as Contemporary Art.

    Technological innovation always brings new socio-ethical issues to bear and we will attend to these debates with a variety of critical tools inherited from a variety of disciplines. As a research studio course, activities will include workshops and tutorials with visiting experts in areas ranging from automation to financialization, all the while tracking the evolving definition of “art worker.” This course is open to juniors and seniors, or sophomores with the permission of the instructor.

    FA 384 A section II 3 Credits Enxuto

  • FA 384A

    Projects: Draft Notation

    This course is open to all third and fourth year students who intend to initiate or pursue a longer term (longer than a semester) art project. Students are expected to present their work-in progress several times each semester, to research the works of other artists, writers, and thinkers, and to participate actively in class discussions. Class meetings will alternate between in-class presentations and discussion, and one on one meetings with the professor.


    Draft Notation is a drawn system used to construct and analyze woven fabric. Used and written about extensively by Bauhaus master weaver Anni Albers, it uses a specialized, straightforward drafting technique to understand complex weaves. As Albers wrote: Whenever the piece of cloth that is the subject of analysis can be cut, this process of tracing the course of each thread—usually with the help of a long needle—is greatly simplified. For, by cutting along a filling thread, for instance, the path of the thread can be seen in cross section when looked at from above, and the following filling threads can be lifted out one by one, giving a chance for easier observation of the thread’s intersections than when seen on the face of the fabric only.

    FA 384A Section I Open to all 3rd and 4th year students. 3 Credits. Raven


Science

  • RS 201

    Science

    Topics vary.

    3 general studies credits. Required science course. To be taken during the sophomore, junior or senior year. Armstrong/Nadin

  • RS 201a

    Earth Science

    The course will cover a broad range of Earth Science topics including understanding rocks and the stories they tell, the vast scale of geological time, dynamic plate tectonic processes, climate change, and what makes the planet habitable for life. It will inspire wonder and a deep appreciation for the Earth. The course will present to students a different way of looking at the Earth: not as something that is constant and static but rather dynamic and constantly changing, a place with a broad and exciting history of which we are only a small part.

  • RS 201f

    Introduction to Biomaterials

    From the time of cave paintings, artists have been depicting living organisms. But what happens when the art consists of the organism itself or its products? Living material is dynamic by nature, and so the artwork changes with time, perhaps in unpredictable ways. In this class we will explore various biomaterials, including organisms such as bioluminescent plankton and plants that respond to touch, fermentations that create color pigments or cellulose mats, and the DNA that controls it all. The class will be part lecture, part hands-on experience.

  • RS 201g

    Astronomy

    This course begins with an historical overview and then introduces the contemporary understanding of the universe. Students learn about the key elements of the universe, including motion, energy, gravity and light. Topics include; the solar system and its origins; the sun; stellar evolution including white dwarfs, neutron stars, and black holes; galaxies beginning with the structure of the Milky Way; dark matter, dark energy and the Big Bang theory. Labs and field trips to an observatory augment class discussion.

  • RS 201h

    Science: Physics for Artists

    The course provides an overview of discoveries in physics over the past two millenia, focusing on the development of modern theories. Topics include nature of light and matter, relativity, quantum mechanics, evolution of the universe and the nature of science. Knowledge of basic algebra is assumed. Field trips and computer lab assignments are included in the syllabus.

    3 credits. One-semester. Kreis

  • RS 201i

    Science, Technology and Societal Impact

    This course explores the ramifications of the latest scientific discoveries and technological breakthroughs. How will they affect our lives and the planet? What social, moral, and ethical questions have inspired artists to use them in their work? Each class will focus on a different scientific discipline such as genetic engineering, cognitive neuroscience, tissue engineering, synthetic biology, and personal genomics. An explanation of the science will be followed by a discussion examining the utopic/ dystopic myths surrounding these technologies, fact vs. hype, and what questions should be raised as we implement them. Guest artists and their work will be featured along with scientists and ethicists.

  • RS 201j

    The Climate System

    The Earth’s climate system is complex and dynamic, and a solid understanding of this system is crucial in order to address concerns about human influences on climate. In this course we examine the basic physical and chemical processes that control the modern climate system, including the role of incoming solar radiation, the greenhouse effect, ocean and atmospheric circulation, and El Niño. We also look at the methods and archives used to reconstruct climate in the past. We explore the possible effects of greenhouse gas emissions caused by humans on modern and future climate by examining the models used in climate prediction, and discuss the challenges of modeling such a complex system. Although this course is taught from a primarily scientific perspective, it includes discussions of the roles policy and economics play in the current dialogue on global climate change. Finally, we look at some of the local impacts of climate change and preparedness planning for New York City.

  • RS 201k

    The Science Behind Growing and Using Food

    Food is essential to life, but also a source of conflict. What choices are right for us? In this class we will explore the science behind food production and use. Organic/sustainable farming, GMOs, experiments with different diets, general nutrition and the molecular basis of cooking will all be covered.


Sculpture

  • FA 391A, FA 391B

    Sculpture

    This course helps students develop projects related to their own vision and ideas. Class discussions address the full range of conceptual and material processes that generate production. Research and development will be given equal weight to finished work. Intention, form, materiality and context will be analyzed against larger questions of culture in relation to artistic practice. Student work will be reviewed by the entire class and by the instructor on an individual basis. Lectures, readings and field trips will complement studio critiques.

    3 credits. One-semester course. Adams

  • FA 392A, FA 392B

    Sculpture

    This course helps students explore and develop their personal process of making art, with an emphasis on sculpture. Formal and material choices will be discussed in relation to intention, meaning, context, and contemporary culture. Research and development are given equal weight to finished work. Students will discuss their process individually with the instructor, and present work for review to the entire class. In-class slide presentations, readings, and field trips will complement class discussions.

    Dyson

  • FA 394A, FA 394B

    Sculpture

    This course takes a concrete approach to the development of critical discourse about works of art. It exercises the student’s ability to analyze the activity of making sculpture in particular and advances the student’s understanding of how to proceed in the studio. Problems of structure, materials, meaning, intention and context are the subject of class discussion.

    3 credits. One-semester course. Farmiga

  • FA 397A, FA 397B

    Sculpture

    This course takes a concrete approach to the development of critical discourse about works of art. It exercises the student’s ability to analyze the activity of making sculpture in particular and advances the student’s understanding of how to proceed in the studio. Problems of structure, materials, meaning, intention and context are the subject of class discussion.

    3 credits. One-semester. Ashford

  • FA 398A, FA 398B

    Sculpture

    This course helps students develop projects related to their own vision and ideas. Class discussions address the full range of conceptual and material processes that generate production. Research and development will be given equal weight to finished work. Intention, form, materiality and context will be analyzed against larger questions of culture in relation to artistic practice. Student work will be reviewed by the entire class and by the instructor on an individual basis. Lectures, readings and field trips will complement studio critiques.

    3 credits. One-semester. Magid/Raven

  • FA 499A, FA 499B

    Independent Study in Sculpture

    1-3 credits. Requires approval of instructor and the Dean of the School of Art

  • TE 390

    Casting Techniques

    Casting Techniques is a process intensive course covering the methods of translating a wax positive into bronze or other non-ferrous metals. All associated techniques from beginning a plaster or rubber mold to casting, chasing, finishing and patination of metal sculptures will be covered. Students will explore a variety of approaches to casting, as well as engage in discussions involving the history of bronze casting, and its place in contemporary art.

    2 credits. One-semester course. May not be repeated. Free elective credit. Wilhelm


Sound Art

  • FA 281

    Project in Sound Art

    This class will introduce strategies for understanding and participating in the aural world. The course is divided into specific weekly topics, including acoustic ecology, circuit-bending, radio transmission, synaesthesia and others. Screenings, readings and discussion are supported by hands-on workshops in capturing, manipulating and reproducing sound in unconventional ways. Grading is based on three student projects and participation in class discussions.

    3 credits. One-semester course. May not be repeated. Poff

  • Founded by inventor, industrialist and philanthropist Peter Cooper in 1859, The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art offers education in art, architecture and engineering, as well as courses in the humanities and social sciences.

  • “My feelings, my desires, my hopes, embrace humanity throughout the world,” Peter Cooper proclaimed in a speech in 1853. He looked forward to a time when, “knowledge shall cover the earth as waters cover the great deep.”

  • From its beginnings, Cooper Union was a unique institution, dedicated to founder Peter Cooper's proposition that education is the key not only to personal prosperity but to civic virtue and harmony.

  • Peter Cooper wanted his graduates to acquire the technical mastery and entrepreneurial skills, enrich their intellects and spark their creativity, and develop a sense of social justice that would translate into action.