Rewriting Painting

Thursday, April 19, 2018, 6:30pm - 8:00pm

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Join Barry Schwabsky and a panel of leading painters - all graduates of the School of Art - and critics for a lively debate on the state and shape of contemporary painting and its critical reception. How far have artists extended the boundaries of the medium in the 21st century, and what does it mean to be identified as a painter today? Is the word ‘painting’ still adequate to describe a practice which no longer necessarily involves paint or flat surfaces? And to what extent do the ways in which we write about painting influence both the public’s reception of the work and contemporary practice itself?

This event launches the new Lund Humphries Contemporary Painters Series, and following the panel discussion the artists and writers will be signing copies of their new books.

About the Chair and the Panel:

  • Barry Schwabsky is an art critic and poet, and is series editor of the Lund Humphries Contemporary Painters Series.
  • Lois Dodd A'48 is widely admired as a ‘painter’s painter’ whose timeless landscapes and city scenes display subtle effects of place, light and weather within graphically distilled compositions.
  • Painter Thomas Nozkowski A'67 chose to express personal experience through small-scale abstract canvases that refused to adhere to a ‘signature style' or align themselves with a particular movement.
  • Philip Taaffe A'77 has expanded the parameters of painting through his use of silkscreen, linocuts, collage, stencils, gouache, chine-collé, marbling, acrylic, enamel, watercolor and gold-leaf.
  • Faye Hirsch is an author, curator and critic who has published widely on contemporary art. She is the author of a volume on Lois Dodd in the Lund Humphries Contemporary Painters Series.
  • John Yau is an award-winning poet, art critic and curator who has published many books of poetry, fiction and art criticism. He is the author of volumes on Thomas Nozkowski and Philip Taaffe in the Lund Humphries Contemporary Painters Series.

The event is free and open to the public. General public, including the school community, should reserve a space here. Please note first come, first seated; an RSVP does not guarantee admission as we generally overbook to ensure a full house.

Located in The Great Hall, in the Foundation Building, 7 East 7th Street, between Third and Fourth Avenues

  • Founded by inventor, industrialist and philanthropist Peter Cooper in 1859, The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art offers education in art, architecture and engineering, as well as courses in the humanities and social sciences.

  • “My feelings, my desires, my hopes, embrace humanity throughout the world,” Peter Cooper proclaimed in a speech in 1853. He looked forward to a time when, “knowledge shall cover the earth as waters cover the great deep.”

  • From its beginnings, Cooper Union was a unique institution, dedicated to founder Peter Cooper's proposition that education is the key not only to personal prosperity but to civic virtue and harmony.

  • Peter Cooper wanted his graduates to acquire the technical mastery and entrepreneurial skills, enrich their intellects and spark their creativity, and develop a sense of social justice that would translate into action.