Open City: NY - Paris

Friday, March 10, 2017, 6:30pm - 8:30pm

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In the wake of the volatile situation many refugees face in Europe, and with the Trump Administration’s proposed immigration ban and the questioning of US Sanctuary City status, the Institute for Public Architecture is launching the Open City series. The series will look at the challenges and solutions to supporting and housing vulnerable populations in our city centers, including refugees, emergency shelter populations, and disaster victims.

Mr. Missika will present two humanitarian centers recently opened in Paris. Our panelists will then discuss NYC and Paris initiatives meant to support immigrants and other vulnerable populations in inclusive communities.

Refugee Housing in Paris

Michael Kimmelman, New York Times Architecture Critic, will moderate the discussion with:

Jean-Louis Missika, Paris Deputy Mayor of Architecture, Planning and Economic Development

Nisha Agarwal, Commissioner, NYC Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs

Saskia Sassen, Professor of Sociology, Columbia University

Co-sponsors: The Irwin S Chanin School of Architecture of The Cooper Union, The Architectural League of New York, AIANY Housing Committee, AIANY Planning & Urban Design Committee.

This event is free and open to the public. RSVP here

Located in The Frederick P. Rose Auditorium, at 41 Cooper Square (on Third Avenue between 6th and 7th Streets)

  • Founded by inventor, industrialist and philanthropist Peter Cooper in 1859, The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art offers education in art, architecture and engineering, as well as courses in the humanities and social sciences.

  • “My feelings, my desires, my hopes, embrace humanity throughout the world,” Peter Cooper proclaimed in a speech in 1853. He looked forward to a time when, “knowledge shall cover the earth as waters cover the great deep.”

  • From its beginnings, Cooper Union was a unique institution, dedicated to founder Peter Cooper's proposition that education is the key not only to personal prosperity but to civic virtue and harmony.

  • Peter Cooper wanted his graduates to acquire the technical mastery and entrepreneurial skills, enrich their intellects and spark their creativity, and develop a sense of social justice that would translate into action.