VT-CU-2016-Courses


Course Descriptions - 2014 Conditions

 

GENERAL STUDIES

  • ARCH 103-104

    Calculus and Analytic Geometry I, II

     

    (3 credits per semester, 6 total credits)

    Course Description: Emphasis on topics that involve the mathematical approach to geometrical and physical relationships and on basic concepts and applications of calculus and functions of one and two variables.

    Course Goals & Objectives: We aim for a competency in dealing with mathematical problems that involve changing quantities. We also bring in history with an aim to understanding the origin of mathematical ideas and how they relate to other disciplines. We study mostly differentiation in ARCH 103 and integration in ARCH 104. The emphasis is in being able to differentiate and integrate using examples from engineering and nature.

    Student Performance Criterion/a addressed:

    Topical Outline: Differentiation 80%, special functions 20% (for ARCH 103), Integration 80%, series 10%, Analytic geometry 10% (for ARCH 104)

    Prerequisites:

    Textbooks/Learning Resources: Gilbert Strang, “Calculus”

    Offered:Year 1 - Fall and Spring semesters

    Faculty assigned:

    ARCH 103, Fall 2013 – Steven Kreis

    ARCH 104, Spring 2014 – Steven Kreis

    ARCH 103, Fall 2014 – Steven Kreis

    ARCH 104, Spring 2015 – Steven Kreis

     

  • ARCH 114

    Freehand Drawing

     

    (3 credits per semester, 6 total credits)

    Course Description: Basic drawing skills, composition and color perception. Lecture Seminar and Studio components; various media.

    Course Goals & Objectives: To develop the student’s ability to draw, to translate idea into sketch into accurate representation in a variety of media relying exclusively on the hand and the eye.

    Student Performance Criterion/a addressed:

    Topical Outline: Lectures 20%, Seminar crits 30%, Studio Drawing 50%

    Prerequisites: Required of all Year 1 students

    Textbooks/Learning Resources: Weekly crits; hand-outs; lectures, pin-ups, mid-term and final review with guest critics. Outside lecturers invited for specific topics.

    Offered: Year 1 – Fall and Spring semesters

    Faculty assigned:

    ARCH 114 A Fall 2013 – Michael Webb, Gia Wolff

    ARCH 114 B Spring 2014 – Michael Webb, John Hartmann

    ARCH 114 A Fall 2014 – Michael Webb, Gia Wolff

    ARCH 111 B Spring 2015 – Michael Webb, John Hartmann, Gia Wolff

  • ARCH 205.01

    Advanced Concepts

     

    (2 total credits)

    Course Description: This course is intended to be an advanced course dealing with the relationship between architectural space and some other discipline in the humanities. The course deals with an interdisciplinary approach toward a new poetic and the phenomenology, psychology and metaphysics of space.

    Course Goals & Objectives: The Seminar ‘A Material Imagination of The Social Contract’ is grounded in the idea that the poetic and material imagination affords us unique means of engaging the world and making a contribution. Working from the principle that our capacity to act in the world is grounded in our capacity to recognize and comprehend transformation, the course covers a large arc of content, asking questions of our world, our disciplines and our humanity. The lectures begin with a series of talks called ‘the time promises of capital’. These focus on the mechanisms and instruments of capital exchange including: debt, equity and compound interest, as well as incorporation and insurance. Following the ‘time promises’ is a series of discussions on words, looking at the role of language in both our individual imagination and our collective participation in culture. Here we explore the many links between language, individual agency and collective judgment. Following the discussion on words we move to a series of talks focused on space. These look at the many forms of exchange occurring between our spaces and us with a focus on our capacity to construct literate spaces, spaces of participation inseparable from our memory and imagination. The final series of conversations looks at the relationships between many forms of knowledge and action. With examples from 20th century: art, architecture, poetry, film and theater, we move through a close examination of disciplinary structures, the nature of disciplinary geography and the transformation of knowledge. Ultimately, the conversations explore the poetic / material imagination as a means of contributing to knowledge and addressing our social and political lives: It seeks to imagine a better world: new modes of concern for the other, new promises for distributing risk and resources, new words for rebinding freedom, new spaces of empathy and ethics.

    Student Performance Criterion/a addressed: A1 PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION

    Topical Outline: 30% The Time Promise I,II,III: Capital: debt, equity, compound interest; Price discovery, market capitalization, risk and resource distribution; Globe Double: Mimetic Capital; Technology 20% Words I,II,III: Language to Infinity: Interdependent Autonomy, Under the LEttER; The War Within; Authorship/Authority The stories of consumption; The non-stories of the State 20% Space I,II: Empathetic Disciplines; Reciprocal Spaces; The Distance; The Exchange; Hunting Life; Embodied knowledge, Present tense creativity; John Hejduk and The Social Contract 30% A Material Imagination of the Social Contract: Arts, Letters and Numbers: An expanded disciplinary geography; Through the time mirror: Film; Disciplines of Spirit; Memory, Metabolism and our current geographies

    Prerequisites:

    Textbooks/Learning Resources: David Harvey, Amartya Sen, Richard Rhodes, Georg Simmel, Arundhati Roy, Naomi Klein, Alberto Perez Gomez, Dalibor Vesely, Robert McChesney, Maurice Blanchot, Jorge Luis Borges, Michel Foucault, Harold Bloom, Charles Olson, Vaclav Havel, Susan Sontag, Noam Chomsky, Amy Goodman, Edward Bernays, Henri Bergson, Dr Richard Selzer, Jay Fellows, Alva Noe, Emmanuel Levinas, Frank Wilson, John Hejduk, David Shapiro, William Shakespeare, Antonin Artaud, Gilles Delueze, Maurice Merleau-Ponty and Richard Kearney.

    Offered: Year 5 – Spring semesters

    Faculty assigned:

    ARCH 205.01, Spring 2014 – David Gersten

    ARCH 205.01, Spring 2015 – David Gersten

  • ARCH 205.02

    Advanced Concepts

     

    (2 total credits)

    Course Description: This course is intended to be an advanced course dealing with the relationship between architectural space and some other discipline in the humanities. The course deals with an interdisciplinary approach toward a new poetic and the phenomenology, psychology and metaphysics of space.

    Course Goals & Objectives: By way of a series of lectures, films and open discussions we will examine the phenomenon of ethics made manifest in aesthetics.

    Student Performance Criterion/a addressed: A1 PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATIONS, A6 USE OF PRECEDENTS

    Topical Outline: Architectural Theory: 50%, Design Precedents: 50%

    Prerequisites:

    Textbooks/Learning Resources: Winters, E. Aesthetics & Architecture, Hejduk, J. Pewter Wings, Golden Horns, Stone Veils. Shiner, L. The Invention of Art

    Offered: Year 5 – Fall and Spring semesters

    Faculty assigned:

    ARCH 205.02, Fall 2013 – Roderick Knox

    ARCH 205.02, Spring 2014 – Roderick Knox

    ARCH 205.02, Fall 2014 – Roderick Knox

  • ARCH 205.05

    Advanced Concepts

     

    (2 total credits)

    Course Description: This course is intended to be an advanced course dealing with the relationship between architectural space and some other discipline in the humanities. The course deals with an interdisciplinary approach toward a new poetic and the phenomenology, psychology and metaphysics of space.

    Course Goals & Objectives: An advanced course dealing with the relationship between architectural space and urban history/theory, focused on New York City. To explore the history and ideology of the twentieth-century city taking New York as a case study; to compare and critically reassess the ideas of four important urban thinkers (Mumford, Moses, Jacobs, Koolhaas) and their relevance today; to impart an understanding of the relationship between architecture and the city; to develop research, writing, oral presentation, and critical thinking skills

    Student Performance Criterion/a addressed: A1 PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION, A6 HISTORICAL TRADITIONS

    Topical Outline: Architectural/urban theory: 50%, architectural/urban history 50%

    Prerequisites:

    Textbooks/Learning Resources: An extensive reading list of primary and secondary sources by and about the four thinkers on whom the seminar focuses, among them: excerpts from Lewis Mumford’s The Culture of Cities and Skyline columns in the New Yorker; excerpts from Robert Caro, The Power Broker; excerpts from Jane Jacobs, The Death and Life of Great American Cities; excerpts from Rem Koolhaas, Delirious New York and subsequent writings. Films and videos (like Mumford’s The City, made for the 1939 World’s Fair), supplement written resources. Students are required to visit and document the sites on which they choose to make their class presentations and write their term paper.

    Offered: Year 5 – Fall semester

    Faculty assigned:

    ARCH 205.05, Fall 2013 – Joan Ockman

  • ARCH 205.06

    Advanced Concepts

     

    Transient Boundaries

    (2 total credits)

    Course Description: This course is intended to be an advanced course dealing with the relationship between architectural space and some other discipline in the humanities. The course deals with an interdisciplinary approach toward a new poetic and the phenomenology, psychology and metaphysics of space.

    Course Goals & Objectives: Drawing upon varied perspectives from the arts, anthropology, philosophy, technology and geopolitics, the course explores the concept of transience in architecture and how we can envision new ways of approaching it within the context of space and structure. Introducing the principles and implications of the nomadic vs. the sedentary cultural/environmental models; distinguishing between spaces designed for movement, of movement and in movement; analyzing examples of the nomadic in art and architecture from the ancient to the contemporary in their context; exploring the historical and cultural movements that led to shifts in perception of the manifestation of movement; studying the differences between moving parts vs. a moving whole, continuous vs. discontinuous transformations, rigid vs. non rigid movement; Build the ability to define logic for a spatial system in flux instead of designing a space.

    Student Performance Criterion/a addressed: A1 PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION

    Topical Outline: Spatial Theory: 30%, History: 20%; Architecture Precedents: 35%; Arts Precedents: 15%

    Prerequisites:

    Textbooks/Learning Resources: Fourteen lectures on different aspects of transience, weekly readings, three papers on three different aspects of transience, an architectural proposal for a new way of envisioning the course’s ideas of transience today. Texts include: Auge, M. Non-Places an Introduction to Supermodernity, De Certau, M. The Practice of Everyday Life, Delueze, G. and Guattari, F. A Thousand Plateaus, 1980, Ascott, R. The Construction of Change, Banham, R. A Home is not a House, Blake, P. Walking City, Burroughs, T Architecture of the Nomads, Friedman, Y. “COMMITMENT”, Fuller, R. B. Utopia or Oblivion: The Prospects of Humanity, Kepes, G. Toward Civic Art, Kiesler F. Design Correlation as an Approach to Architectural Planning, Mathews, S. The Fun Palace as Virtual Architecture, McLuhan, M. Understanding Media, Mitchell, W. J. A House Is a Robot for Living in, Nieuwenhuys, C. New Babylon: an urbanism of the future, Orta, L. Operational Aesthetics, Pask, G. The Architectural Relevance of Cybernetics, Pinder, D. Utopian Transfiguration: The Other Spaces of New Babylon, White, F. Deep Space, Woods L. Fluid Space

    Offered: Year 5 – Fall semester

    Faculty assigned:

    ARCH 205.06, Fall 2013 – Daniel Meridor

    ARCH 205.06, Fall 2014 – Daniel Meridor

  • ARCH 205.07

    Advanced Concepts

     

    Camera Construction

    (2 total credits)

    Course Description: This course is intended to be an advanced course dealing with the relationship between architectural space and some other discipline in the humanities. The course deals with an interdisciplinary approach toward a new poetic and the phenomenology, psychology and metaphysics of space.

    Course Goals & Objectives: Advanced study in history and techniques of spatial filmmaking. Each student creates a short film and rig for moving a camera through a building or space. Goals and objectives: Acquire basic knowledge of spatial film history and techniques; Develop skills to make a short film: site survey, storyboard, diagram; Develop skills to make a basic camera rig: research mechanisms, fabrication techniques; Learn advanced camera operation techniques and basic video editing; Communicate spatial idea through film

    Student Performance Criterion/a addressed: A1 Professional Communication, A6 Use of Precedents

    Topical Outline: A1 Professional Communication 10%, A2 Design Thinking Skills 20%, A6 Use of Precedents 20%, B2 Site Design 10%, B3 Technical Documentation 20%, B5 Structural Systems, C1 Research 20%

    Prerequisites:

    Textbooks/Learning Resources: Structural Film by P. Adam Sitney, Collected Writings of Michael Snow, Zoomscape by Mitchell Schwarzer, and various film and video clips.

    Offered: Year 5, Spring semester

    Faculty assigned:

    ARCH 205.07, Spring 2014 – Wes Rozen

  • FA 100R A

    Shop Techniques

     

    (1 credit)

    Course Description: An introduction to the physical aspects of working with wood, metal and plaster (mold making).

    Course Goals & Objectives: Each discipline entails 6 sessions of 2 hours duration. All three techniques classes are held simultaneously throughout the Shop. Each instructor attempts to provide about one hour of demonstration and lecture about a specific method or machine pertaining to their own discipline. The second hour of class is reserved for the students' hands-on experience of duplicating the day’s topic. In general, there is a logical progression to the six sessions, mostly starting with more basic and fundamental machines and techniques, and then progressing into more complex and specific operations. Each instructor employs his or her own unique hands-on applications, often involving continuity of process. The primary goal is to provide the correct understanding and implementation of Safety Procedures with all machines and tools in the facility. Secondary goal: introduce each student to what is possible within the facility. Our main purpose for providing a hands-on session is to both give them a "taste" of the technique, but also to "feel out" each student in the hope that we can ascertain, to a certain degree, which ones are more at ease and which ones might need extra special guidance. In sum, our objective is to help and assist the students during each of their many projects, and make their Shop experience rewarding, pleasant, and above all, safe. Future goals include the fine-tuning of each session, both in honing down the large amount of information that each student is absorbing into essentials, as well as relating the physicality of each operation, as simply and intelligibly as possible. The students who do take this course are graded on a strictly PASS/FAIL basis. Since there are only six key sessions for each discipline no absences are acceptable. Any classes that are missed for any reason, must be “made up”, through an arrangement, to rectify the *failing grade *(or INCOMPLETE which is given with legitimate signed doctor’s note). Failure to do so will prohibit shop usage. This system is to ensure all students are of equal experience and knowledge, and especially reduces the ACCIDENT RISK. Occasionally a student who has passed the entire course wishes to attend “refresher” sessions. We welcome and encourage this wholeheartedly. We provide most of the safety apparatus that is needed, some of which is to be purchased, and encourage each student to employ them of their own volition, yet we adhere to strict enforcement of these procedures. We also maintain large amounts of hand tools and superfluous “small parts” and accessories, which are available to all within assignment and school related usage.

    Student Performance Criterion/a addressed:

    Topical Outline: The Course is subdivided into three sections: Wood, Metal, Mold Making/Plastics. Each class is two hours long, with no actual “extra” time allotted. This totals 36 hours for Architecture students. AFTER one group (or class) of students completes six weeks of one discipline, they then “rotate” into the next assigned area, until all three subjects have been completed. Any further percentage of time spent in these areas is based solely upon assignments given from the students’ other Architecture classes.

    Prerequisites: No actual prerequisites, but this is a mandatory course for all incoming Freshmen in the School of Architecture, as well as any transfer and visiting students who academically need to use the facility. We provide most of the safety apparatus that is needed, some of which is to be purchased, and encourage each student to employ them of their own volition, yet we adhere to strict enforcement of these procedures.

    Textbooks/Learning Resources: This is a “hands-on” course, both a Lecture/Demonstration. The actual use of the facilities is the main learning resource. There are a number of reference textbooks and magazine articles on various methods and techniques available in the shop for detailed assistance if requested.

    Offered: Fall 2013, Fall 2014

    Faculty assigned:

    Lea Cetera, Frank Kurtzke, Kevin Leonard, Joe Riley, Andrew Wilhelm

  • FA 100R B

    Shop Techniques

     

    (1 credit)

    Course Description: An introduction to the physical aspects of working with wood, metal and plaster (mold making).

    Course Goals & Objectives: Each discipline entails 6 sessions of 2 hours duration. All three techniques classes are held simultaneously throughout the Shop. Each instructor attempts to provide about one hour of demonstration and lecture about a specific method or machine pertaining to their own discipline. The second hour of class is reserved for the students' hands-on experience of duplicating the day’s topic. In general, there is a logical progression to the six sessions, mostly starting with more basic and fundamental machines and techniques, and then progressing into more complex and specific operations. Each instructor employs his or her own unique hands-on applications, often involving continuity of process. The primary goal is to provide the correct understanding and implementation of Safety Procedures with all machines and tools in the facility. Secondary goal: introduce each student to what is possible within the facility. Our main purpose for providing a hands-on session is to both give them a "taste" of the technique, but also to "feel out" each student in the hope that we can ascertain, to a certain degree, which ones are more at ease and which ones might need extra special guidance. In sum, our objective is to help and assist the students during each of their many projects, and make their Shop experience rewarding, pleasant, and above all, safe. Future goals include the fine-tuning of each session, both in honing down the large amount of information that each student is absorbing into essentials, as well as relating the physicality of each operation, as simply and intelligibly as possible. The students who do take this course are graded on a strictly PASS/FAIL basis. Since there are only six key sessions for each discipline no absences are acceptable. Any classes that are missed for any reason, must be “made up”, through an arrangement, to rectify the *failing grade *(or INCOMPLETE which is given with legitimate signed doctor’s note). Failure to do so will prohibit shop usage. This system is to ensure all students are of equal experience and knowledge, and especially reduces the ACCIDENT RISK. Occasionally a student who has passed the entire course wishes to attend “refresher” sessions. We welcome and encourage this wholeheartedly. We provide most of the safety apparatus that is needed, some of which is to be purchased, and encourage each student to employ them of their own volition, yet we adhere to strict enforcement of these procedures. We also maintain large amounts of hand tools and superfluous “small parts” and accessories, which are available to all within assignment and school related usage.

    Student Performance Criterion/a addressed:

    Topical Outline: The Course is subdivided into three sections: Wood, Metal, Mold Making/Plastics. Each class is two hours long, with no actual “extra” time allotted. This totals 36 hours for Architecture students. AFTER one group (or class) of students completes six weeks of one discipline, they then “rotate” into the next assigned area, until all three subjects have been completed. Any further percentage of time spent in these areas is based solely upon assignments given from the students’ other Architecture classes.

    Prerequisites: No actual prerequisites, but this is a mandatory course for all incoming Freshmen in the School of Architecture, as well as any transfer and visiting students who academically need to use the facility. We provide most of the safety apparatus that is needed, some of which is to be purchased, and encourage each student to employ them of their own volition, yet we adhere to strict enforcement of these procedures.

    Textbooks/Learning Resources: This is a “hands-on” course, both a Lecture/Demonstration. The actual use of the facilities is the main learning resource. There are a number of reference textbooks and magazine articles on various methods and techniques available in the shop for detailed assistance if requested.

    Offered: Spring 2014, Spring 2015

    Faculty assigned:

    Lea Cetera, Frank Kurtzke, Kevin Leonard, Joe Riley, Andrew Wilhelm

  • HSS1

    The Freshman Seminar

     

    (3 credits)

    Course Description: A literature course concentrating on poetry and drama. Selected texts from antiquity and the Renaissance are common to all sections, with works from other genres, periods and cultures chosen by individual instructors.

    Course Goals & Objectives: The course develops aesthetic appreciation of literary texts and encourages a range of critical responses. Through close reading and extended discussion students learn to articulate their responses in written and spoken form.

    Student Performance Criterion/a addressed: A1 PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION

    Topical Outline:

    Prerequisites: None

    Textbooks/Learning Resources: Frankenstein (Shelley), Paradise Lost (Milton), Doctor Faustus (Marlowe), Inferno (Dante). Some sections offer variations on this list.

    Offered: Fall 2013, Fall 2014

    Faculty assigned

    Fall 2013: Germano, Hymn, McGlade, Ramdass, Sayres, Schulman, Siemann, Stange, Stieber, Weir

    Fall 2014: Hyman, Ramdass, Sayres, Schulman, Spector, Stange, Stieber, Stoner, Swann, Walker

  • HSS2

    Texts and Contexts: Old Worlds and New

     

    (3 credits)

    Course Description: A study of texts and topics from 1500 to 1800. Sections read common texts and some selections by individual instructors, with emphasis on literary expression and cultural context. Requirements include written analysis and class discussion.

    Course Goals & Objectives: Extending skills from HSS1, HSS2 concentrates on developing cultural and political understanding through close reading, class discussion, and careful writing.

    Student Performance Criterion/a addressed: A1 PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION, A7 HISTORY & GLOBAL CULTURE

    Topical Outline:

    Prerequisites: HSS1

    Textbooks/Learning Resources: Primary Texts: important documents ranging from 1500-1800, e.g. Utopia (More), a Renaissance text such as The Prince (Machiavelli), a Renaissance play such as The Tempest (Shakespeare), a Renaissance science text such as Galileo, Letter to the Grand Duchess Christina, the Second Discourse (Locke), a prose narrative such as Oroonoko (Behn), the Equiano narrative, a novel by Defoe, Franklin’s autobiography; Discourse on Inequality (Rousseau)

    Offered: Spring 2014, Spring 2015

    Faculty assigned

    Spring 2014: Sayres, Stieber, Buckley, Ramdass, Johnson, Siemann, Schweigert

    Spring 2015: Buckley, Engel, Johnson, Masterovoy, Ramdass, Sayres, Stange, Stieber, Westbury

  • HSS3

    The Making of Modern Society

     

    (3 credits)

    Course Description: A study of the key political, social and intellectual developments of modern Europe in global context. This course is organized chronologically, beginning with the Industrial and French Revolutions.

    Course Goals & Objectives: Students develop an understanding of the political grammar and material bases of the present day by exploring the social origins of conservatism, liberalism, feminism, imperialism and totalitarianism. In discussions and in lectures students learn to study and to respond critically in written and spoken form to a variety of historical documents and secondary texts.

    Student Performance Criterion/a addressed: A1 PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION, A7 HISTORY & GLOBAL CULTURE, A8 CULTURAL DIVERSITY/ SOCIAL EQUITY

    Topical Outline:

    Prerequisites: HSS1, HSS2

    Textbooks/Learning Resources: Worlds Together, Worlds Apart (Tignor), Dark Continent (Mazower), extensive online documents

    Offered: Fall 2013, Fall 2014

    Faculty assigned

    Fall 2013: Agazarian, Chelminski, Griffin, Grossmann, Honsberger, Muller, Westbury

    Fall 2014: Amzi-Erdogdular, Barton, Buckley, Griffin, Johnson, Masterovoy, Muller, Westbury

  • HSS4

    The Modern Context: Figures and Topics

     

    (3 credits)

    Course Description: A study of important figures or topics from the modern period whose influence extends into Contemporary culture. Requirements include individual research and writing projects. In choosing a section, students should consider its figure or topic for study.

    Course Goals & Objectives: Guided independent writing projects and oral presentations build on skills developed in HSS1-3, making this the capstone of the sequence required of all Cooper Union students.

    Student Performance Criterion/a addressed: A1 PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION, A7 HISTORY & GLOBAL CULTURE, A8 CULTURAL DIVERSITY/ SOCIAL EQUITY

    Topical Outline:

    Prerequisites: HSS1, HSS2, and HSS3

    Textbooks/Learning Resources: Texts and resources vary with topic

    Offered: Spring 2014, Spring 2015

    Faculty assigned

    Spring 2014: Grossmann, Hyman, Llorens, McGlade, Sava, Standley, Stoner, Swann, Weir

    Spring 2015: D’Avella, Lepri, Llorens, Muller, Newton, Ramdass, Schulman, Spector, Stoner, Swann, Walker

PROFESSIONAL STUDIES

  • ARCH 111 A

    Architectonics

     

    (4 credits per semester, 8 total credits)

    Course Description: Introduction to the study of architecture; investigation of the interrelationships of space, structure and visual composition. Exploration of the syntax of architecture. Models and orthographic drawing.

    Course Goals & Objectives: Explore the visual language of architectural form, syntax and grammar; analysis of material, spatial and temporal syntax contained in principles of craft; inhabitation of specific architectonic fragments of the city. Incorporating the practical, technical, poetic meaning of architecture and the communal nature of making within the larger community of the city, each year the students propose and construct inventive architectonic inhabitations.

    In the 2014 Fall Semester, the studio measured, drew and built a model of the Foundation building, which was taken out into New York City to engage the public and key monuments in a series of duets. The Journey was a social poetic act of architecture, a question of ethics and imagination, of caring for the ‘model’ of The Cooper Union and making visible the long, deep bonds between the institution and the public that require creative acts and constant work to maintain.

    Student Performance Criterion/a addressed: A1 PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION, A2 DESIGN THINKING, A4 DESIGN SKILLS, A5 ORDERING SYSTEMS

    Topical Outline: Material imagination 25%; Poetic imagination 25%; Spatial Imagination 25%; Ethical dimension of the discipline of architecture 25%

    Prerequisites: Introduction to (Shop) Techniques course (1 credit per semester) required of all Architectonics students.

    Textbooks/Learning Resources: Bi-Weekly crits; extensive hand-outs; monthly lectures, 12 pin-ups, mid-term and final review with guest critics. The complete list of speakers in the 155-year history of the Great Hall of the Cooper Union served as a reference for the studio.

    Offered: Year 1 - Fall semester

    Faculty assigned:

    ARCH 111 A, Fall 2013 – David Gersten, Aida Miron, Wes Rozen

    ARCH 111 A, Fall 2014 – David Gersten, Rikke Jorgensen, Wes Rozen

     

  • ARCH 111 B

    Architectonics

     

    (4 credits per semester, 8 total credits)

    Course Description: Introduction to the study of architecture; investigation of the interrelationships of space, structure and visual composition. Exploration of the syntax of architecture. Models and orthographic drawing.

    Course Goals & Objectives: Explore the visual language of architectural form, syntax and grammar; analysis of material, spatial and temporal syntax contained in principles of craft; inhabitation of specific architectonic fragments of the city. Incorporating the practical, technical, poetic meaning of architecture and the communal nature of making within the larger community of the city, each year the students propose and construct inventive architectonic inhabitations.

    Student Performance Criterion/a addressed: A1 PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION, A2 DESIGN THINKING, A4 DESIGN SKILLS, A5 ORDERING SYSTEMS

    Topical Outline: Research: 25% Formal exploration: models and materials: 25% Design 25% Representation 25%

    Prerequisites: ARCH 111A Architectonics (Fall semester)

    Textbooks/Learning Resources: Bi-Weekly crits; extensive hand-outs; monthly lectures, pin-ups, mid-term and final review with guest critics. Outside lecturers invited for specific topics.

    Offered: Year 1 - Spring semester

    Faculty assigned:

    ARCH 111 B, Spring 2014 – Mersiha Veledar, Aida Miron, Savina Romanos

    ARCH 111 B, Spring 2015 – Mersiha Veledar, Savina Romanos, Adam Longenbach

  • ARCH 115 A

    History of Architecture I

     

    (3 credits per semester, 6 total credits)

    Course Description: An introduction to the study of the concepts, designs and built examples of architecture from antiquity through approximately the third century C.E. Selected projects from throughout the world will be analyzed in terms of planning, design, structure, technique, function, social context and meaning.

    Course Goals & Objectives: Fundamental ideas of form and space; buildings and cities as expression of philosophical and religious ambitions; stylistic features that represent the historical context of a building; “meta-historical” qualities of architecture that are independent of a cultural period; students conduct independent research.

    Student Performance Criterion/a addressed: A1 PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION, A6 USE OF PRECEDENTS, A7 HISTORY & GLOBAL CULTURE, A8 CULTURAL DIVERSITY/ SOCIAL EQUITY

    Topical Outline: Permanent dwellings and organized communities of the Stone Age (20%); processional temples and funerary monuments of Egypt and Mesopotamia (30%); cities and sanctuaries of ancient Greece (30%); large scale infrastructures and grand interiors of ancient Rome (20%).

    Prerequisites:

    Textbooks/Learning Resources: Various readings from architectural history; historic texts of antiquity: poetry, literature, philosophy; museum visits; expert guest lectures

    Offered: Year 1 - Fall semester

    Faculty assigned:

    ARCH 115 A, Fall 2013 – Georg Windeck

    ARCH 115 A, Fall 2014 – Georg Windeck

  • ARCH 115 B

    History of Architecture I

     

    (3 credits)

    Course Description: An introduction to concepts, designs, and built examples of world-wide ritual spaces from ca.300-ca. 1400 AD

    Course Goals & Objectives: To impart an understanding of planning, structure, design, technique, function, use, social context and meaning in world architecture through the analysis of selected examples of ritual spaces. The chosen examples also provide a useful body of significant visual resources that were selected to enhance the development of a visual vocabulary. Students develop their skills through quizzes, oral reports and a final “historical” design project.

    Student Performance Criterion/a addressed: A1 PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION, A6 USE OF PRECEDENTS, A7 HISTORY & GLOBAL CULTURE, A8 CULTURAL DIVERSITY/ SOCIAL EQUITY

    Topical Outline: Approx. 7% per topic, 15 weeks 40% western tradition 60% other traditions

    Prerequisites: ARCH 115 A

    Textbooks/Learning Resources: R. G. Calkins, Medieval Architecture in Western Europe; G. Mitchell, The Hindu Temple; M.Stokstad and M.W. Cothren, Art History, Portable Edition. A View of the World: Part One, 5th ed. A list of all the buildings discussed and 125-plus pages of plans and drawings and other handouts.

    Offered: Year 1 - Spring semester

    Faculty assigned:

    ARCH 115 B, Spring 2014 – William Clark

    ARCH 115 B, Spring 2015 – William Clark

  • ARCH 118 A-B

    Computer Applications and Descriptive Geometry

     

    (2 credits per semester, 4 total credits)

    Course Description: Descriptive geometry as a science of graphical representation of three-dimensional lines, surfaces and solids with emphasis on development of drawing and drafting skills.

    Course Goals & Objectives: To provide the student with the knowledge and skills necessary to beautifully delineate just about anything with geometric precision; a working familiarity with a range of tools, ranging from the manual to the digital, and with architectural drawing conventions; the ability to think through the geometric logics of description and depiction; to critically engage the mechanics of architectural drawing and projection; to encourage the pursuit of excellence in the act of drawing; to understand the relationship of geometric frameworks (Euclidean, Projective, Analytical, Topological, etc.) to representation; to study how previous generations of architects have used specific arguments in geometry and projection to produce new forms of knowledge; discover new avenues of inquiry and experimentation within geometric description.

    Student Performance Criterion/a addressed:

    Topical Outline: 2-Dimensional Composition 10%; Descriptive Geometry/Orthographic Projection 30%; Central/Oblique Projection 25%; 3D digital modeling 25%; Scripting/Processing 10%

    Prerequisites: None

    Textbooks/Learning Resources: Weekly lectures/demonstrations on geometry, projection systems, and/or representation supplemented with weekly readings/tutorials. Principle Texts: Booker, P. J. A History of Engineering Drawing; Evans, R. The Projective Cast: Architecture and Its Three Geometries; Euclid. Elements; Farrish, W. Isometrical Perspective; Francis, G. A Topological Picturebook; Kandinsky, W. Point and Line to Plane; Kemp, M. The Science of Art; Kepes, G. Language of Vision; Miralles, E. “How to Layout a Croissant”; Panofsky, E. Perspective as Symbolic Form; Payne, A. Grasshopper Primer V 2.0; Pottman, H. Architectural Geometry; Wellman, B.L. Technical Descriptive Geometry.

    Offered: Year 1 - Fall & Spring semesters

    Faculty assigned:

    ARCH 118A, Fall 2013 - James Lowder

    ARCH 118B, Spring 2014 – James Lowder

    ARCH 118A, Fall 2014 – James Lowder

    ARCH 118B, Spring 2015 - James Lowder

  • ARCH 121 A

    Design II

     

    (5 credits)

    Course Description: Projects comprise elemental architectural programs wherein the student is required to sustain the formal investigations of first year while integrating the complexities of program, context and site. Spatial, structural, material, environmental and visual design are integrated. Emphasis is placed on communicating concepts through drawings and models.

    Course Goals & Objectives: 1) Understanding of the relationship between formal elements and formal configurations with program; 2) understanding site and context through analysis of seminal examples of modern architecture; 3) to develop the design of an architectural project that articulates formal elements and organization with program, site and type; 4) understanding of drawing techniques and models in relation to form and scale.

    Student Performance Criterion/a addressed: A1 PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION, A2 DESIGN THINKING, A3 INVESTIGATIVE/RESEARCH, A4 DESIGN SKILLS, A5 ORDERING SYSTEMS, A6 USE OF PRECEDENTS, B2 SITE DESIGN, B5 STRUCTURAL SYSTEMS

    Topical Outline: Representation/Communication 25%, Research and Precedents 35%, Design 40%

    Prerequisites: ARCH 111A-B Architectonics

    Textbooks/Learning Resources: Analysis: Modern Architecture history books, Books on Architecture Typologies; Architects Work Books i.e. Alvar Aalto; Louis Kahn; Le Corbusier; Alfonso Eduardo Reidy; Gordon Bunshaft; Candilis Josic and Woods. Conceptual Reference for Design Project: Archive Fever, Jacques Derrida; The Order of Discourse, Michel Foucault, Appendix; The Order of Things, Michel Foucault, Introduction; The Wall and the Books, Jorge Luis Borges.

    Offered: Year 2 - Fall semester

    Faculty assigned:

    ARCH 121 A, Fall 2013 – Pablo Lorenzo-Eiroa, Katerina Kourkoula, Matthew Roman, Will Shapiro

    ARCH 121 A, Fall 2014 – Diana Agrest, Dorit Aviv, Lis Cena

  • ARCH 121 B

    Design II

     

    (5 credits)

    Course Description: Projects comprise elemental architectural programs wherein the student is required to sustain the formal investigations of first year while integrating the complexities of program, context and site. Spatial, structural, material, environmental and visual design are integrated. Emphasis is placed on communicating concepts through drawings and models.

    Course Goals & Objectives: 1) Understanding of the relationship between formal elements and formal configurations with program; 2) understanding site and context through analysis of seminal examples of modern architecture; 3) develop the design of an architectural project that articulates formal elements and organization with program, site and type; 4) understanding of drawing techniques and models in relation to form and scale.

    Student Performance Criterion/a addressed: A1 PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION, A2 DESIGN THINKING, A3 INVESTIGATIVE/RESEARCH, A4 DESIGN SKILLS, A5 ORDERING SYSTEMS, A6 USE OF PRECEDENTS, A8 CULTURAL DIVERSITY/ SOCIAL EQUITY, B2 SITE DESIGN, B5 STRUCTURAL SYSTEMS

    Topical Outline: Representation/Communication 35%, Research and Precedents 20%, Design 45%

    Prerequisites: ARCH 111A-B, 121A

    Textbooks/Learning Resources: Weekly desk crits; Topical lectures by studio faculty and outside guests; Mid-term and Final juries with outside critics; Various references assigned as a function of the particular program and building typology used in the design exercise.

    Offered: Year 2 - Spring semester

    Faculty assigned:

    ARCH 121 B, Spring 2014 – James Lowder, Dorit Aviv, Will Shapiro, Brian Tabolt

    ARCH 121 B, Spring 2015 – James Lowder, Dorit Aviv, Will Shapiro, Lydia Xynogala

  • ARCH 122 A-B

    Structures I

     

    (2 credits per semester, 4 total credits)

    Course Description: A qualitative examination of the behavior of structures. Characteristics and development of the stresses generated from the simple to the complex. A study of the materials of construction used in structures.

    Course Goals & Objectives: 1) To make use of the structural vocabulary of loads, forces, moments, load effects, stress, and material properties and behavior correctly and precisely. 2) To gain a clear understanding of the behavior of structural systems, from simple cables to complex frames and membranes, including supports and connections. 3) To gain an understanding of the relationship between a structural system and architectural form. 4) The ability to use structure as one of many ordering systems in a design project. 5) To make use of force diagrams and sketches to analyze and explain structural behavior. 6) To gain a clear understanding of the physical properties of commonly used structural materials, such as strength, elasticity, etc. 7) To be well prepared for quantitative analysis and design in subsequent semesters of the sequence.

    Student Performance Criterion/a addressed: A5 ORDERING SYSTEMS, B5 STRUCTURAL SYSTEMS

    Topical Outline: Qualitative statics and mechanics with some mathematical modeling (20%); study of behavior of specific structural elements, assemblies and systems (40%); discussing the relationship between the structural idea and mechanism of actual architectural projects and the architectural intent (20%); Student presentations and discussion of selected topic of current interest; creating physical models clarifying structural behavior and for load testing. Discuss modes of failure based on models (20%)

    Prerequisites: None

    Textbooks/Learning Resources: Required Text: Salvadori, M. and Heller, R.: Structure in Architecture: The Building of Buildings. Required Readings: Berger H. “From Tents to Tensile Architecture”, “How Tensile Structures Work”. Light Structures-Structures of Light, The Art and Engineering of Tensile Architecture. Authorhouse 2005. 21-54. Billington D. and Garlock M. “Thin-Shell Concrete Structures: The Master Builders”. Seven Structural Engineers: The Felix Candela Lectures, NY: MoMA, 2008. 160-173. Elliot C. “Structural Engineering”, Technics and Architecture. Cambridge MA: MIT Press 1992. 386-405. Owen D. “The Anti-Gravity Men”. The New Yorker 25 June 2007: 70-81. Sandaker, Eggen & Cruvellier. “The Truss and the Space Frame”. The Structural Basis of Architecture, NY: Routledge, 2011. 2012-226. Illustrated lectures, charts and visualization diagrams. Quiz, final exam and projects.

    Offered: Year 2 – Fall and Spring semesters

    Faculty assigned:

    ARCH 122 A, Fall 2013; ARCH 122 B, Spring 2014; ARCH 122 A, Fall 2014, ARCH 122 B, Spring 2015 – Elizabeth O’Donnell

  • ARCH 125 A

    History of Architecture II

     

    (3 credits)

    Course Description: The course focuses on the architecture of the XV, XVI and XVI centuries and on the origins and developments of conceptual and instrumental categories of the discipline.

    Course Goals & Objectives: To develop a working knowledge of figures, buildings, urban initiatives and theories of the XV, XVI and XVI centuries architecture; To develop an understanding of the cultural context and conceptual premises of the origins and developments of the fundamental instrumentalities of the discipline such as plan, section, elevations, the concept of articulation and composition, the relations of part to whole, the concept of architectural organism; To discuss the emerging role of the figure of the architect as intellectual worker in relation to the conversations taking place within other domains of knowledge and practices involved in the transformation of the totality of the atrophic environment; To exercise by means of close readings of primary graphic sources the ability to analyze, describe and compare different architectures from formal and conceptual point of view; To familiarize with interpretations and critical perception of the architecture of the period as articulated in advance scholarly contributions; To compare synchronically, by means of case studies, the architectural production in different geographic areas Middle-east, Asia and central and south America; To develop the student ability to communicate effectively in written and oral form.

    Student Performance Criterion/a addressed: A6 USE OF PRECEDENTS, A7 HISTORY & GLOBAL CULTURE, A8 CULTURAL DIVERSITY/ SOCIAL EQUITY

    Topical Outline: European architecture: 70%, Non-European architecture 30%

    Prerequisites: ARCH 115A-B

    Textbooks/Learning Resources: Each weekly lecture is supplemented by specific readings. General required text: Peter Murray, The Architecture of the Italian Renaissance; John Varriano, Italian Baroque and Rococo Architecture.

    Offered: Year 2 - Fall semester

    Faculty assigned:

    ARCH 125 A, Fall 2013 – Guido Zuliani

    ARCH 125 A, Fall 2014 – Guido Zuliani

  • ARCH 125 B

    History of Architecture II

     

    (3 credits)

    Course Description: A history of the buildings, and the principles, concepts and theories underlying the development of Western and non-Western modern architecture, from 1750 to 1950.

    Course Goals & Objectives: Expose the varied and complex roots of “modern” architecture; reveal the cultural, political and material changes behind the daring innovations that took place in architecture from the eighteenth century onwards. Impart the competing visions and theories that led to the instigation of new kinds of institutions; and introduce the new technologies, innovative materials and artistic interests that led to new building types and new formal solutions. The study of seminal buildings, influential themes and individual master architects informs, in both Western and Non-Western contexts.

    Student Performance Criterion/a addressed: A6 USE OF PRECEDENTS, A7 HISTORY & GLOBAL CULTURE, A8 CULTURAL DIVERSITY/ SOCIAL EQUITY

    Topical Outline: History of Architecture: Design and precedents 45%, history of technology and material development 20%, architectural theory 20%, cultural history and art history 15%.The concentration of the course is 75% Western architecture, 25% non-Western architectures.

    Prerequisites: ARCH 115A-B, ARCH 125A

    Textbooks/Learning Resources:: Primary readings: Barry Bergdoll, European Architecture 1750-1890; Kenneth Frampton, Modern Architecture: A Critical History (Fourth Edition), Ching, Jarzombek, and Prakash, A Global History of Architecture; Tafuri and Dal Co, Modern Architecture. 15- three hours lecture classes. Requirements: Term research paper (and mid-semester submission) including a series of analytical drawings or model.

    Offered: Year 2 - Spring semester

    Faculty assigned:

    ARCH 125B, Spring 2014 – Tamar Zinguer

    ARCH 125B, Spring 2015 – Tamar Zinguer

  • ARCH 131 A

    Design III

     

    (5 credits)

    Course Description: Study and analysis of historical precedents followed by a sequence of design problems of increasing complexity. Emphasis on the planning of buildings and the interrelationships among form, structure, detail and technologies.

    Course Goals & Objectives: To have students: analyze the multiple factors that influence the design of an architectural project and interrogate its underlying premises through documentation; produce a set of scaled drawings and models, both digital and analog, that demonstrate a thorough understanding of the conditions that have produced the building design; extrapolate design principles from the analysis and use these in an original design exploration. These include but are not limited to: Movement, Program, Site, Structure, Enclosure Assembly, MEP, Life Safety.

    Student Performance Criterion/a addressed: A1 PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION, A2 DESIGN THINKING, A3 INVESTIGATIVE/RESEARCH, A4 DESIGN SKILLS, A5 ORDERING SYSTEMS, A6 USE OF PRECEDENTS, A7 HISTORY & GLOBAL CULTURE, B1 PRE-DESIGN, B2 SITE DESIGN, B4 TECHNICAL DOCUMENTATION, B5 STRUCTURAL SYSTEMS, B6 ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS, B7 BUILDING ENVELOPE & ASSEMBLIES, B8 BUILDING MATERIALS & ASSEMBLIES, B9 BUILDING SERVICE SYSTEMS, C1 RESEARCH, C2 INT. EVALUATIONS/DECISION-MAKING, C3 INTEGRATIVE DESIGN

    Topical Outline: Research & Analysis: 40%, Resolution of Building Systems including Program, Site, Structure, MEP, Envelope, Code Compliance: 30%, Creative Design Proposal: 30%

    Prerequisites: ARCH 111A-B, ARCH 121A-B

    Textbooks/Learning Resources: Faculty Lectures; 5 Topic focused Design Exercises with handouts, readings, and pin-up reviews; Bi-Weekly Desk Crits; Mid-term & Final Reviews with invited guest critics.

    Offered: Year 3 – Fall semester

    Faculty assigned:

    ARCH 131 A, Fall 2013 – Stephen Rustow, Mersiha Veledar, David Allin, Samuel Anderson, Ashok Raiji

    ARCH 131 A, Fall 2014 – Stephen Rustow, Tamar Zinguer, Sofia Krimizi, Samuel Anderson, Ashok Raiji

  • ARCH 131 B

    Design III

     

    (5 credits)

    Course Description: Study and analysis of historical precedents followed by a sequence of design problems of increasing complexity. Emphasis on the planning of buildings and the interrelationships among form, structure, detail and technologies.

    Course Goals & Objectives: To have students respond to multiple factors that influence the design of an architectural project and propose a solution through the integration of these in a design and produce a set of scaled drawings and models, both digital and analog that demonstrate a thorough understanding of the conditions that impact the resolution of the building design. Emphasis placed on the creative design work that develops from addressing and integrating these conditions. These include but are not limited to: Program, Site, Structure, Enclosure Assembly, MEP, Life Safety and Accessibility codes.

    Student Performance Criterion/a addressed: A1 PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION, A2 DESIGN THINKING, A3 INVESTIGATIVE/RESEARCH, A4 DESIGN SKILLS, A5 ORDERING SYSTEMS, B1 PRE-DESIGN, B2 SITE DESIGN, B3 CODES & REGULATIONS, B4 TECHNICAL DOCUMENTATION, B5 STRUCTURAL SYSTEMS, B6 ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS, B7 BUILDING ENVELOPE & ASSEMBLIES, B8 BUILDING MATERIALS & ASSEMBLIES, B9 BUILDING SERVICE SYSTEMS, C1 RESEARCH, C2 INT. EVALUATIONS/DECISION-MAKING, C3 INTEGRATIVE DESIGN, D1 STAKEHOLDER ROLES

    Topical Outline: Research & Analysis: 10%, Resolution of Building Systems including Program, Site, Structure, MEP, Envelope, Code Compliance: 50%, Creative Design Proposal: 40%

    Prerequisites: ARCH 111A-B, ARCH 121A-B, ARCH 131A

    Textbooks/Learning Resources: Faculty Lectures; 5 Topic focused Design Exercises with handouts, readings, and pin-up reviews; Bi-Weekly Desk Crits; Mid-term & Final Reviews with invited guest critics.

    Offered: Year 3: Spring semester

    Faculty assigned:

    ARCH 131 B, Spring 2014 – Michael Young, David Allin, Rosalyne Shieh, Samuel Anderson, Ashok Raiji

    ARCH 131 B, Spring 2015 – Michael Young, David Allin, Rosalyne Shieh, Samuel Anderson, Ashok Raiji

  • ARCH 132 A

    Structures II

     

    (2 credits)

    Course Description: The study of Statics is the external gravity and lateral force systems acting on the structural elements. The study of the strength of materials is to explore the internal forces and deformations that resulted from external forces.

    Course Goals & Objectives: Students will learn load path analysis, vector addition and force systems, equilibrium equations, free-body diagrams, plane trusses, rigid frames, and arches. Students will study stress and strain, elasticity, strength of material and deformation, thermal effects, center of gravity, moment of inertia, and moment & shear diagrams.

    Student Performance Criterion/a addressed: B5 STRUCTURAL SYSTEMS, C2 INT. EVALUATIONS/DECISION-MAKING, C3 INTEGRATIVE DESIGN

    Topical Outline: Statics (60%); Strength of Materials (40%)

    Prerequisites: Arch 103/104, Ph 165/166 and Arch 122 A-B Structures I

    Textbooks/Learning Resources: Statics and Strength of Materials for Architecture and Building Construction (Barry Onouye/Kevin Kane); Steel Construction Manual (AISC 13th edition); National Design Specification for Wood Construction (NDS 2005).

    Offered: Year 3 - Fall semester

    Faculty assigned:

    ARCH 132 A, Fall 2013 – Sheng Shi

    ARCH 132 A, Fall 2014 – Sheng Shi

  • ARCH 132 B

    Structures II

     

    (2 credits)

    Course Description: Steel structure design and Wood structure design.

    Course Goals & Objectives: Students will learn the latest steel and wood deign Codes and Specifications, design steel and wood beams as part of bending elements; design steel and wood columns as part of axially loaded compression elements; tension element design; design steel and wood member connections.

    Student Performance Criterion/a addressed: B5 STRUCTURAL SYSTEMS, C2 INT. EVALUATIONS/DECISION-MAKING, C3 INTEGRATIVE DESIGN

    Topical Outline: Steel structure design (50%); Wood structure design (50%)

    Prerequisites: Arch 103/104, Ph 165/166 and Arch 122 A-B Structures I, ARCH 132A Structures II

    Textbooks/Learning Resources: Statics and Strength of Materials for Architecture and Building Construction (Barry Onouye/Kevin Kane); Steel Construction Manual (AISC 13th edition); National Design Specification for Wood Construction (NDS 2005).

    Offered: Year 3 - Spring semester

    Faculty assigned:

    ARCH 132 B, Spring 2014 – Sheng Shi

    ARCH 131 B, Spring 2015 – Sheng Shi

  • ARCH 133

    Introduction to Urban History and Theories

     

    (2 total credits)

    Course Description: An introduction to Urban History and to the principles, concepts, and theories of Urbanism, from antiquity to the present, with an emphasis on the 20th Century urbanism.

    Course Goals & Objectives: Impart a fundamental understanding of the influences on urban form through a close reading of the 18th- 20th c development of 4 cities; introduce principles of urban history and urban theory; develop and illustrate a methodological framework that emphasizes urban geography, material resources, political and economic forces as determinants of urban form; analysis of specific contexts for urban planning and architectural design; critical role of ‘accident’ and ‘disaster’ on city development; presentation of selected texts in 19th and 20th urban theory in historical and geographical context.

    Student Performance Criterion/a addressed: A5 ORDERING SYSTEMS, A6 USE OF PRECEDENTS, A7 HISTORY & GLOBAL CULTURE, A8 CULTURAL DIVERSITY/ SOCIAL EQUITY, B1 PRE-DESIGN, B10 FINANCIAL CONSIDERATIONS

    Topical Outline: Urban History: 40%, Design and Precedents: 30%, Urban Theory: 30%

    Prerequisites: None

    Textbooks/Learning Resources: Three illustrated lectures for each of four cities, supplemented by weekly readings; two exams. Principle texts: Hall, P. Cities of Tomorrow; Bacon, E. Design of Cities; Rasmussen, S.E. London: the Unique City; Towns and Buildings; Evenson, N. Paris, A Century of Change; Cronon, W. Nature’s Metropolis; Cucci, G et al. The American City; Steinhart, N. Chinese Imperial City Planning; Wheatley, P. Pivot of the Four Quarters; Howard, E. Garden Cities of Tomorrow; Koetter, F. and Rowe, C., Collage City

    Offered: Year 3 - Spring semester

    Faculty assigned:

    ARCH 133, Spring 2014 – Stephen Rustow

    ARCH 133, Spring 2015 – Stephen Rustow

  • ARCH 134 A

    Environmental Technologies

     

    (3 credits)

    Course Description: Environmental and life safety systems as they affect program and building form, including mechanical (heating, cooling, ventilating), water supply and disposal, electrical, lighting, acoustics, vertical transportation, communication, security and fire protection. Principles of sustainability. Passive and active systems.

    Course Goals & Objectives: To understand the impact that building systems have on the architecture of buildings, and conversely the impact that architecture (form, orientation, exterior envelope, layout, etc.) has on building services systems, energy and natural resource usage and ultimately, the environment. To demonstrate that design is an activity that does not occur singularly, but takes place in a completely integrated process in which architects, structural engineers, mechanical and electrical engineers participate in a collaborative manner. How can buildings be designed, constructed and operated so that they are sustainable? 


    Student Performance Criterion/a addressed: B2 SITE DESIGN, B6 ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS, B7 STRUCTURAL SYSTEMS, B9 BUILDING SERVICE SYSTEMS, C2 INT. EVALUATIONS/ DECISION-MAKING, C3 INTEGRATIVE DESIGN

    Topical Outline: Environmental Principles: 30%; Environmental Systems (HVAC, Life Safety, Lighting, Transportation): 40%; Energy, Waste and Sustainability: 20%, LEED: 10%

    Prerequisites: None

    Textbooks/Learning Resources: Mechanical and Electrical Equipment for Buildings, 11th Edition Walter Grondzik, Alison Kwok, Benjamin Stein & John S. Reynolds John Wiley & Sons (Publisher)

    Offered: Year 3 – Spring semester

    Faculty assigned:

    ARCH 134B, Spring 2014 – Ashok Raiji

    ARCH 134B, Spring 2015 – Ashok Raiji

  • ARCH 134 B

    Environmental Technologies

     

    (3 credits)

    Course Description: Environmental and life safety systems as they affect program and building form, including mechanical (heating, cooling, ventilating), water supply and disposal, electrical, lighting, acoustics, vertical transportation, communication, security and fire protection. Principles of sustainability. Passive and active systems.

    Course Goals & Objectives: To understand the impact that building systems have on the architecture of buildings, and conversely the impact that architecture (form, orientation, exterior envelope, layout, etc.) has on building services systems, energy and natural resource usage and ultimately, the environment. To demonstrate that design is an activity that does not occur singularly, but takes place in a completely integrated process in which architects, structural engineers, mechanical and electrical engineers participate in a collaborative manner. How can buildings be designed, constructed and operated so that they are sustainable? 


    Student Performance Criterion/a addressed: B2 SITE DESIGN, B6 ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS, B7 STRUCTURAL SYSTEMS, B9 BUILDING SERVICE SYSTEMS, C2 INT. EVALUATIONS/ DECISION-MAKING, C3 INTEGRATIVE DESIGN

    Topical Outline: Environmental Principles: 20%; Environmental Systems (HVAC, Life Safety, Lighting, Transportation): 30%; Energy, Waste and Sustainability: 20%, LEED: 10%; System Design: 20%

    Prerequisites: 134A

    Textbooks/Learning Resources: Mechanical and Electrical Equipment for Buildings, 11th Edition Walter Grondzik, Alison Kwok, Benjamin Stein & John S. Reynolds John Wiley & Sons (Publisher)

    Offered: Year 3 – Spring semester

    Faculty assigned:

    ARCH 134B, Spring 2014 – Ashok Raiji

    ARCH 134B, Spring 2015 – Ashok Raiji

  • ARCH 135 A

    Building Technology

     

    (2 credits)

    Course Description: Materials and methods of architectural construction, lectures, examination and study of historic as well as current building techniques.

    Course Goals & Objectives: Provide an introduction to - and appreciation of - materials and assemblies of architectural construction; introduce principles of sustainability and integration to the design process; illustrate and develop a methodological framework that emphasizes intrinsic material qualities, common sense, and holistic thinking. Examine and analyze established and new techniques and assemblies. Understand when a building’s materiality reinforces or undermines its ideas. This course does not separate “construction” from “design” but attempts to foster integrative thinking through semester-long projects keyed to the design studio. A case-study lecture and field trip to a building in construction vivifies these topics.

    Student Performance Criterion/a addressed: B4 TECHNICAL DOCUMENTATION, B7 BUILDING ENVELOPE & ASSEMBLIES, B8 BUILDING MATERIALS & ASSEMBLIES, B9 BUILDING SERVICE SYSTEMS, C2 INT. EVALUATIONS/DECISION-MAKING, C3 INTEGRATIVE DESIGN

    Topical Outline: Materials and Assemblies: 50%; Sustainable and Integrative principles: 30%; Detailing and Constructability: 20%

    Prerequisites:: None

    Textbooks/Learning Resources: Illustrated lectures and workshops, field trip, weekly drawing assignments, exams, final project tied to students’ analysis projects in 131A

    Offered:

    Faculty assigned:

    ARCH 135 A, Fall 2013 – Samuel Anderson

    ARCH 135 A, Fall 2014 – Samuel Anderson

  • ARCH 135 B

    Building Technology

     

    (2 credits)

    Course Description: Materials and methods of architectural construction, lectures, examination and study of historic as well as current building techniques.

    Course Goals & Objectives: Provide an introduction to - and appreciation of - materials and assemblies of architectural construction; introduce principles of sustainability and integration to the design process; illustrate and develop a methodological framework that emphasizes intrinsic material qualities, common sense, and holistic thinking. Examine and analyze established and new techniques and assemblies. Understand when a building’s materiality reinforces or undermines its ideas. This course does not separate “construction” from “design” but attempts to foster integrative thinking through semester-long projects keyed to the design studio. A case-study lecture and field trip to a building in construction vivifies these topics.

    Student Performance Criterion/a addressed: B4 TECHNICAL DOCUMENTATION, B7 BUILDING ENVELOPE & ASSEMBLIES, B8 BUILDING MATERIALS & ASSEMBLIES, B9 BUILDING SERVICE SYSTEMS, C2 INT. EVALUATIONS/DECISION-MAKING, C3 INTEGRATIVE DESIGN

    Topical Outline: Materials and Assemblies: 50%; Sustainable and Integrative principles: 30%; Detailing and Constructability: 20%

    Prerequisites: 135A

    Textbooks/Learning Resources: Illustrated lectures and workshops, field trip, weekly drawing assignments, exams, (final project tied to students’ designs in 131B)

    Offered: Year 3 –Spring semester

    Faculty assigned:

    ARCH 135 B, Spring 2014 – Samuel Anderson

    ARCH 135 B, Spring 2015 – Samuel Anderson

  • ARCH 141 A

    Design IV

     

    (5 credits)

    Course Description: Design Studio with a focus on the investigation of urban programs requiring the integration of form, structure and space. Examination of the complexities implicit in the resolution of urban architectural problems.

    Course Goals & Objectives: Understanding of the urban architectural problem at various scales. Skills in analysis to advance an understanding of the relationship of the urban fabric, natural systems, landforms, infrastructure and cultural characteristics of site. Advance the skills of visualization to allow an evolution of understanding of urban phenomena. Develop an understanding of strategies of urban transformation through architecture. Develop the use of various media skills to explore architectural and spatial possibilities within the urban context.

    Student Performance Criterion/a addressed: A1 PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION, A2 DESIGN THINKING, A3 INVESTIGATIVE/RESEARCH, A4 DESIGN SKILLS, A5 ORDERING SYSTEMS, A6 USE OF PRECEDENTS, B2 SITE DESIGN, B6 ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS, C1 RESEARCH

    Topical Outline: Site analysis and historic overview 15%, examination of spatial conditions, production of diagrams 10%, group assignments, assembling a collective narrative, 10%, development of the architectural elements and program, 30%, plan/section development 20%, visualization and presentation of the work, 15%.

    Prerequisites: ARCH 111A-B, ARCH 121A-B, ARCH 131A-B

    Textbooks/Learning Resources: General bibliography provided, see studio briefs, reading suggested based upon directions of study undertaken by each individual student. Lectures throughout semester by various faculty and visiting critics, minimum three per semester, bi-weekly desk crits, and four full reviews of class work including final reviews with visiting critics.

    Offered: Year 4 – Fall semester

    Faculty assigned:

    ARCH 141A, Fall 2013 – Kevin Bone, Tulay Atak, Theodore Kofman, Sofia Krimizi, Sean Sculley

    ARCH 141A, Fall 2014 – Kevin Bone, Anthony Vidler, Tulay Atak, Matthew Roman, Theodore Kofman

  • ARCH 141 B

    Design IV

     

    (5 credits)

    Course Description: Investigation of urban programs and sites requiring the integration of form, structure and space. Examination of the complexities implicit in the resolution of urban problems. Analytic studies and explorations generate specific programs for development of each project. Emphasis given to large-scale integrations and the impact of urban transformations upon existing fabric

    Course Goals & Objectives: To have students produce a comprehensive analysis of multiple determinants of architectural form, using a historical reference building from a given typology or period. Complete documentation of the reference, constructed from multiple sources; detailed analysis of siting, movement, program, structure, enclosure, environmental context, among other factors. Emphasis on understanding of interrelationships between factors. Extrapolation of design principles from the analysis to use projectively in final exercise.

    Student Performance Criterion/a addressed: A1 PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION, A2 DESIGN THINKING, A3 INVESTIGATIVE/RESEARCH, A4 DESIGN SKILLS, A5 ORDERING SYSTEMS, A6 USE OF PRECEDENTS, A7 HISTORY & GLOBAL CULTURE, B2 SITE DESIGN, C1 RESEARCH

    Topical Outline: Research and documentation 15%, Analysis (drawings and model) 60%, Projective design exercise based on principles found in reference building 25%

    Prerequisites: ARCH 111A-B, ARCH 121A-B, ARCH 131A-B, ARCH 141A

    Textbooks/Learning Resources: Bi-weekly desk-crits, extensive handouts, bi-monthly lectures, including guest specialist faculty in structures, building technologies, building enclosure, environmental systems, 4-6 pin-ups, mid-term and final review with guest critics.

    Offered: Year 4 – Spring semester

    Faculty assigned:

    ARCH 141 B, Spring 2014 – Diane Lewis, Robert Estrin, Daniel Meridor, Peter Schubert

    ARCH 141 B, Spring 2015 – Diane Lewis, Daniel Meridor, Peter Schubert

  • ARCH 142 A

    Structures III

     

    (2 credits)

    Course Description: The design of reinforced concrete using stress methods and plastic design is combined with individual projects in low-rise concrete structures. Elements of soil mechanics and soil investigations are included in foundations design.

    Course Goals & Objectives: Students will learn reinforced concrete materials, history and development of reinforced concrete structures; modern concrete construction; flexure design of rectangular beams, T-beams, and beams with compression reinforcements; design of shear in beams, consideration of serviceability and crack control; design of continuous beams and one way slab; direct design method of two way slab; concrete column design; concrete foundation design; and concrete basement and retaining wall design.

    Student Performance Criterion/a addressed: B5 STRUCTURAL SYSTEMS, B9 BUILDING SERVICE SYSTEMS

    Topical Outline: Reinforced concrete design (80%); Foundation design (20%)

    Prerequisites: Arch 121 A-B Structures I, Arch 132 A-B Structures II

    Textbooks/Learning Resources: Concrete Structures (Mehdi Setareh/Robert Darvas); Masonry Structures – Behavior and Design (Robert Drysdale / Ahmad Hamid); New York City Building Code – 2008 Edition.

    Offered: Year 4 – Fall semester

    Faculty assigned:

    ARCH 142 A, Fall 2013 – Sheng Shi

    ARCH 142 A, Fall 2014 – Sheng Shi

  • ARCH 142 B

    Structures III

     

    (2 credits)

    Course Description: The design of masonry structure with allowable stress design method. Introduction to wind and seismic design forces; and understanding of building lateral force resisting systems.

    Course Goals & Objectives:Students will learn ancient and contemporary masonry structures; masonry construction materials, masonry assemblages, flexure design of reinforced masonry beams and lintels, reinforced masonry wall design (out of plane bending); masonry column and pilaster design, introduction to wind and seismic design forces per New York City Building Code (2008 Edition)

    Student Performance Criterion/a addressed: B5 STRUCTURAL SYSTEMS, B9 BUILDING SERVICE SYSTEMS

    Topical Outline: Reinforced masonry design (80%); Wind and seismic forces (20%)

    Prerequisites: Arch 121A-B Structures I, Arch 132 A-B Structures II, ARCH 142A Structures III

    Textbooks/Learning Resources: Concrete Structures (Mehdi Setareh/Robert Darvas); Masonry Structures – Behavior and Design (Robert Drysdale / Ahmad Hamid); New York City Building Code – 2008 Edition.

    Offered: Year 4 –Spring semester

    Faculty assigned:

    ARCH 142 B, Spring 2014 – Sheng Shi

    ARCH 142 B, Spring 2015 – Sheng Shi

  • ARCH 143 A

    Construction Management

     

    (1 credit)

    Course Description: Introduction to construction management principles, techniques and methods including scheduling, cost-estimating, planning and controlling construction process.

    Course Goals & Objectives: Provide context for the construction and realization of design work; understanding of costs and estimating, scheduling, contractual responsibilities, construction sequencing. Create familiarity with Project Delivery Contract Types, Construction Planning and Value Engineering.

    Student Performance Criterion/a addressed: B10 FINANCIAL CONSIDERATIONS, D1 STAKEHOLDER ROLES, D2 PROJECT MANAGEMENT, D3 BUSINESS PRACTICES, D4 LEGAL RESPONSIBILITIES, D5 PROFESSIONAL CONDUCT

    Topical Outline: Readings, Lectures and Discussion 50%; Construction Site visits 20%; Homework and Group project 30%

    Prerequisites: None

    Textbooks/Learning Resources: Construction Practices Management text developed for the course by Instructor; Real Estate Development, Zuckerman & Belvins; topical handouts and case studies to prepare construction site visits

    Offered: Year 4 –Fall semester

    Faculty assigned:

    ARCH 143A, Fall 2013 – Louis Katsos

    ARCH 143A, Fall 2014 – Louis Katsos

  • ARCH 143 B

    Construction Management

     

    (1 credit)

    Course Description: Second course in 2-semester sequence on construction management principles, techniques and methods including scheduling, cost-estimating, planning and controlling construction process.

    Course Goals & Objectives: Provide context for the construction and realization of design work; understanding of costs and estimating, scheduling, contractual responsibilities, construction sequencing. Develop understanding of “Hard Costs” in construction. Real Estate component introduces Market Timing, Financial Feasisbility, Financing and Equity issues.

    Student Performance Criterion/a addressed: B10 FINANCIAL CONSIDERATIONS, D1 STAKEHOLDER ROLES; D2 PROJECT MANAGEMENT, D3 BUSINESS PRACTICES, D4 LEGAL RESPONSIBILITIES, D5 PROFESSIONAL CONDUCT

    Topical Outline: Readings, Lectures and Discussion 50%; Construction Site visits 20%; Homework and Group project 30%

    Prerequisites: ARCH 143A Construction Management (Fall)

    Textbooks/Learning Resources: Construction Practices Management text developed for the course by Instructor; Real Estate Development, Zuckerman & Belvins; topical handouts and case studies to prepare construction site visits

    Offered: Year 4 –Spring semester

    Faculty assigned:

    ARCH 143B, Spring 2014 – Louis Katsos

    ARCH 143B, Spring 2015 – Louis Katsos

  • ARCH 151 A-B

    Thesis

     

    (5 credits per semester, 10 total credits)

    Course Description: Studio course: choice of problem, scope and method is the responsibility of the student. Problems analyzed and studied with faculty from each discipline and visiting critics.

    Course Goals & Objectives: A synthesis of four years’ educational experience: to research deeply a problem of the student’s choice with critical direction from faculty; to develop an explicit methodology for examining the research and broader historical, socio-cultural context; to formulate a design proposition and develop it into a coherent and well represented response to the problem.

    Student Performance Criterion/a addressed: A1 PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION, A2 DESIGN THINKING, A3 INVESTIGATIVE/RESEARCH, A4 DESIGN SKILLS, A5 ORDERING SYSTEMS, A6 USE OF PRECEDENTS, B1 PRE-DESIGN, B4 TECHNICAL DOCUMENTATION B2 SITE DESIGN, C1 RESEARCH, C2 INT. EVALUATIONS/DECISION-MAKING, C3 INTEGRATIVE DESIGN, C4 STAKEHOLDER ROLES

    Topical Outline: Topical emphasis is adapted by Faculty in consultation with the student as problem is selected and developed. Generally: research and historic overview 20%, development of the program and critical approach 25%, analysis of site and spatial conditions 15%, design response 20%, visualization and presentation of the work 20%.

    Prerequisites: ARCH 111A-B, ARCH 121A-B, ARCH 131A-B, ARCH 141A-B

    Textbooks/Learning Resources: General bibliography provided, readings and precedents suggested based upon subject and approach study proposed by each individual student. Lectures throughout semester by various faculty and visiting critics, bi-weekly desk crits, and four full reviews of class work including two days of final reviews with visiting critics.

    Offered: Year 5 – Fall and Spring semesters

    Faculty assigned:

    ARCH 151 A, Fall 2013 – David Turnbull, Hayley Eber, Pep Aviles

    ARCH 151 B, Spring 2014 – David Turnbull, Hayley Eber, Pep Aviles, Theodore Kofman

    ARCH 151 A, Fall 2014 – David Turnbull, Hayley Eber, Pep Aviles

    ARCH 151 B, Spring 2015 – David Turnbull, Hayley Eber, Pep Aviles , Theodore Kofman

  • ARCH 152

    Structures IV

     

    (2 credits)

    Course Description: Pre-stressed concrete, wind and earthquake design for tall structures and special structures; high-rise steel and concrete buildings; shells.

    Course Goals & Objectives: To create familiarity with and fundamental design ability for pre-stressed concrete design; lateral resistive systems; moment connected frames; trusses for lateral forces; shear walls; combinations of systems.

    Student Performance Criterion/a addressed: A6 USE OF PRECEDENTS, B5 STRUCTURAL SYSTEMS

    Topical Outline: Pre-stressed concrete design 20%, Lateral resistance 20%, m-c frames 20%, trusses 20%, system combinations 20%

    Prerequisites: ARCH 122A-B, ARCH 132A-B, ARCH 142 A-B

    Textbooks/Learning Resources: Lectures by Instructor; students take extensive notes; full design assignment for a 30 – 50 story building including beam and column schedule, details and footings; exam

    Offered: Year 5 – Fall semester

    Faculty assigned:

    ARCH 152, Fall 2013 – Markus Schulte

    ARCH 152, Fall 2014 – Markus Schulte

  • ARCH 154 A

    Professional Practice

     

    (1 credit)

    Course Description: The role of the architect in relation to the community, client, builder, worker and engineer. Societal, ethical, legal and personal obligations. Office organization and administration.

    Course Goals & Objectives: This course is composed of two-parts. The Fall semester - the Architect in Society – focuses on issues and institutions that architects interact with in society and the community. These two parts provide an introduction to the wide range of challenges faced by the professional architect, both within the profession and in society-at-large. Project management techniques, approaches to involving the local community in the design process and negotiation strategies.

    Student Performance Criterion/a addressed: B10 FINANCIAL CONSIDERATIONS, D1 STAKEHOLDER ROLES, D2 PROJECT MANAGEMENT, D3 BUSINESS PRACTICES, D4 LEGAL RESPONSIBILITIES, D5 PROFESSIONAL CONDUCT

    Topical Outline: Public Processes and Interactions 25%; Office organization and Project Management 25%; Law, Ethics and History 25%; Marketing, Clients and Negotiation 25%

    Prerequisites: None

    Textbooks/Learning Resources: Various readings from original source material, including: The Architect: Chapters in the History of the Profession: Ed. Spiro Kostoff; The Architect’s Handbook of Professional Practice, Student Edition; Penn Central Transportation Co. v. New York City 438 U.S. 104 (1978); Arnoff: The ladder of community participation; “GETTING TO YES” Fisher and Ury; “JUST SAY NO” Jim Camp

    Offered: Year 5 – Fall semester

    Faculty assigned:

    ARCH 154 A, Fall 2013 – Michael Samuelian

    ARCH 154 A, Fall 2014 – Michael Samuelian

  • ARCH 154 B

    Professional Practice

     

    (1 credit)

    Course Description: The role of the architect in relation to the community, client, builder, worker and engineer. Societal, ethical, legal and personal obligations. Office organization and administration.

    Course Goals & Objectives: This course is composed of two-parts. The Spring semester - the Architect in the Office - outlines the issues that architects face in the office, from marketing and staffing, to project management and implementation. These two parts provide an introduction to the wide range of challenges faced by the professional architect, both within the profession and in society-at-large. Project management techniques, approaches to involving the local community in the design process and negotiation strategies.

    Student Performance Criterion/a addressed: B10 FINANCIAL CONSIDERATIONS, D1 STAKEHOLDER ROLES, D2 PROJECT MANAGEMENT, D3 BUSINESS PRACTICES, D4 LEGAL RESPONSIBILITIES, D5 PROFESSIONAL CONDUCT

    Topical Outline: Public Processes and Interactions 25%; Office organization and Project Management 25%; Law, Ethics and History 25%; Marketing, Clients and Negotiation 25%

    Prerequisites: None

    Textbooks/Learning Resources: Various readings from original source material, including: The Architect: Chapters in the History of the Profession: Ed. Spiro Kostoff; The Architect’s Handbook of Professional Practice, Student Edition; Penn Central Transportation Co. v. New York City 438 U.S. 104 (1978); Arnoff: The ladder of community participation; “GETTING TO YES” Fisher and Ury; “JUST SAY NO” Jim Camp

    Offered: Year 5 – Spring semester

    Faculty assigned:

    ARCH 154 A, Fall 2013 – Michael Samuelian

    ARCH 154 A, Fall 2014 – Michael Samuelian

  • ARCH 225.01

    Advanced Topics

     

    Urban Cloud Atlas: A Collection of Cities and Manifestos in the 20th Century

    (2 total credits)

    Course Description: Advanced study in history, theory, criticism of architecture, urbanism and technology.

    Course Goals & Objectives: This seminar investigates architecture’s agency between social reality and creative fiction through a series of imagined cities narrated and drawn as manifestos in times of intense political and economic uncertainty. Through texts from the 19th to the 21st century, utopian visions of rebuilding the world anew are explored as a total reconstruction project of physical space, social order and living patterns. The investigation of these imagined cities allows a critical understanding of how discourse is recycled and reinterpreted.

    Student Performance Criterion/a addressed: A1 PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION, A6 USE OF PRECEDENTS

    Topical Outline: Literature and History 50%, Final Projects and Presentation 50%

    Prerequisites: Arch 115 A-B History of Architecture I, Arch 125 A-B History of Architecture II or permission of the instructor.

    Textbooks/Learning Resources: Extensive literary readings and regular illustrated lectures, combined with students presentations and class discussions. Individual investigation plus group final project.

    Offered: Year 5 – Fall semester

    Faculty assigned:

    ARCH 225.01, Fall 2013 – Lydia Kallipoliti

  • ARCH 225.02

    Advanced Topics

     

    Seminar on John Hejduk

    (2 total credits)

    Course Description: Advanced study in history, theory, criticism of architecture, urbanism and technology.

    Course Goals & Objectives: To impart, through the development of a monographic seminar (the work of J. Hejduk from 1949 to 2000) a critical knowledge and understanding of those figures, buildings, urban initiatives and theories that formed the cultural landscape of the architectural debates in the second half of the XX century; To discuss the changing role of the figure of the architect as intellectual worker in relation to society’s emerging new problems and concerns; To familiarize with interpretations and critical perceptions of the architecture of the period as articulated in advance scholarly contributions; To exercise by means of close readings of primary sources, both literary and graphic, the ability to analyze, describe and compare different architectures from formal and conceptual point of view; To develop the student ability to communicate effectively in written and oral form.

    Student Performance Criterion/a addressed: A1 Professional Communication, A6 Use of Precedents

    Topical Outline: By means of monographic seminars different cross-sections of the architectural culture of the period are introduced and discussed. The avant-gardes inheritance, practice and theory, the urban problem and new proposals for the city, the possibility of architecture, the complex object, architecture and literature, architecture and poetic.

    Prerequisites: Arch 115 A-B History of Architecture I, Arch 125 A-B History of Architecture II or permission of the instructor

    Textbooks/Learning Resources: Regular illustrated lectures, combined with students presentations and class discussions. Final paper. Each weekly lecture is supplemented by specific readings.

    Offered: Year 5 – Fall semester

    Faculty assigned:

    ARCH 225.02, Fall 2013 – Guido Zuliania

    ARCH 225.02, Fall 2014 – Guido Zuliani

  • ARCH 225.05

    Advanced Topics

     

    The Modern Spectrum: Color in architectural design and construction

    (2 total credits)

    Course Description: Advanced study in history, theory, criticism of architecture, urbanism and technology.

    Course Goals & Objectives: While color was of vital importance for the architecture of the 20th century and the Modern Movement in particular, it is hardly even mentioned in contemporary discourse. This seminar discusses the use of color as a tool of design and element of construction. Examine color theory; the role of color in representation; the relation of color to materiality and program; application techniques, ranging from the urban to the domestic scales. Students are required to design an architectural color scheme.

    Student Performance Criterion/a addressed: A1 PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION, A6 USE OF PRECEDENTS

    Topical Outline: Color Theory 30%, History and Precedents 40%, Projects and Presentation 30%

    Prerequisites: Arch 115 A-B History of Architecture I, Arch 125 A-B History of Architecture II or permission of the instructor.

    Textbooks/Learning Resources: Regular illustrated lectures, combined with students presentations and class discussions. Final project. Each weekly lecture is supplemented by specific readings.

    Offered: Year 5 – Spring semester

    Faculty assigned:

    ARCH 225.05, Spring 2014 – George Windeck

    ARCH 225.05, Spring 2015 – George Windeck

  • ARCH 225.06

    Advanced Topics

     

    Megastructures Then and Now: Content Conditions Concept

    (2 total credits)

    Course Description: Advanced study in history, theory, criticism of architecture, urbanism and technology.

    Course Goals & Objectives: This seminar investigates the development of Megastructures as a formal and social proposition that responds to a certain line of theory in urban and regional planning and a specific analysis of the predicament of the city in nature.

    Student Performance Criterion/a addressed: A1 PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION, A6 USE OF PRECEDENTS

    Topical Outline: Literature and History 50%, Sketchbooks and Final Presentation 50%

    Prerequisites: Arch 115 A-B History of Architecture I, Arch 125 A-B History of Architecture II or permission of the instructor.

    Textbooks/Learning Resources: Lecture presentations and discussion; extensive review of visual historical material; each student keeps a sketchbook which is regularly reviewed by the Instructor.

    Offered: Year 5 – Spring semester

    Faculty assigned:

    ARCH 225.06, Spring 2014 – Anthony Candido

    ARCH 225.06, Spring 2015 – Anthony Candido

  • ARCH 225.09

    Advanced Topics

     

    The Architecture of Play

    (2 total credits)

    Course Description: Advanced study in history, theory, criticism of architecture, urbanism and technology.

    Course Goals & Objectives: Reveal the interrelationship between history of technology and architecture through the study of architectural toys. To examine the intersections of pedagogy, theories of play, means of manufacture and architecture through case-studies, construction sets from 1836 to 1952. To communicate how with four different—wood, stone, metal and paper—blocks and construction sets have reflected changes in the built environment—in form, structure and permanence—towards an architectural language where lightness, modularity, and greater versatility prevailed.

    Student Performance Criterion/a addressed: A1 PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION

    Topical Outline: History of architecture 25%, Architectural theory 25%, History of Technology 25%, Histories of play and education 25%

    Prerequisites: Arch 115 A-B History of Architecture I, Arch 125 A-B History of Architecture II or permission of instructor

    Textbooks/Learning Resources: Semester’s project: design and construct an architectural toy. Johan Huizinga, Homo Ludens: A Study of the Play Element in Culture; Roger Caillois, Man, Play and Games, Friedrich Froebel, The Pedagogics of the Kindergarten, Norman Brosterman, Inventing Kindergarten, and numerous writings by Agamben, Bachelard, Barthes, Baudelaire, W. Benjamin, Levi-Strauss, and others.

    Offered: Year 5 – Fall semester

    Faculty assigned:

    ARCH 225.09, Fall 2013 – Tamar Zinguer

  • ARCH 225.10

    Advanced Topics

     

    Architecture and the History of Science

    (2 total credits)

    Course Description: Advanced study in history, theory, criticism of architecture, urbanism and technology.

    Course Goals & Objectives: Develop an understanding of the creative exchange between architecture and early scientific disciplines in the 17th, 18th, 19th centuries, introduce concepts of chemistry and their impact in the development of new material, construction methodologies and urban theories; develop an understanding of material scale from micro (molecular/material), meso (architecture) macro (urban/landscape) as well as duration and lifespans of matter and their respective ecologies; presentation of selected texts from 20th century historians, writers, artists and architects in the context of the periodic table of elements, develop an alternate historiography.

    Student Performance Criterion/a addressed: A1 PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION

    Topical Outline: Urban History 20%, Technology and Design Precedents 30%, History of Science 20%, History and Theory of Architecture 30%

    Prerequisites: Arch 115 A-B History of Architecture I, Arch 125 A-B History of Architecture II or permission of the instructor

    Textbooks/Learning Resources: Nine illustrated lectures, supplemented by weekly readings, a field trip, lectures from invited guests from the fields of material science, architecture and history of science. Picon, A. The Architecture of Science; Latour, B. and Woolgar S, Laboratory Life: The Social Construction of Scientific Facts; Gan, A. Constructivism ; Kubler, G. The Shapes of Time: Remarks on the History of Things; Gideon, S. Space Time and Architecture: The Growth of a New Tradition; Mendeleev, D. The Urals Iron Industry

    Offered: Year 5 – Spring semester

    Faculty assigned:

    ARCH 225.10, Spring 2014 – Lydia Xynogala

  • ARCH 225.11

    Advanced Topics

     

    History and Theory of Architectural Representation

    (2 total credits)

    Course Description: Advanced study in history, theory, criticism of architecture, urbanism and technology.

    Course Goals & Objectives: To advance an understanding of the history and theory of architectural representation. The topics cover historical changes, techniques, technology, aesthetics, and the interpretation of architectural representation.

    Student Performance Criterion/a addressed: A1 PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION

    Topical Outline: Lecture: 25%, Seminar Reading Discussion: 50%, Research Paper: 25%

    Prerequisites: Arch 115 A-B History of Architecture I, Arch 125 A-B History of Architecture II or permission of the instructor

    Textbooks/Learning Resources: Topic Specific Lectures; Weekly Readings assigned by topic theme; Seminar Discussions led by students

    Offered: Year 5 – Fall semester

    Faculty assigned:

    ARCH 225.11, Fall 2013 – Michael Young

    ARCH 225.11, Fall 2014 – Michael Young

  • ARCH 225.12

    Advanced Topics

     

    Megaform: An Archaeology of Urban Interventions

    (2 total credits)

    Course Description: Advanced study in history, theory, criticism of architecture, urbanism and technology.

    Course Goals & Objectives: History and theory of large-scale architectural interventions which respond to urbanization from nineteen-sixties to the present with an emphasis on ideas of public space. To learn history and theory of architecture in relation to cities and urbanization; To learn history and theory of public space; To develop analytical skills to address urban form and large-scale architectural project by closely reading and discussing assigned texts; To develop research skills by pursuing research on a specific case study by gathering, reading and outlining published material; To develop communication skills by giving presentations in class

    Student Performance Criterion/a addressed: A1 PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION

    Topical Outline: Architectural History 35%, Architectural Theory 35%, Urban Theory 15%, Design Precedents 15%

    Prerequisites: Arch 115 A-B History of Architecture I, Arch 125 A-B History of Architecture II or permission of the instructor

    Textbooks/Learning Resources: Lectures by the instructor, assigned readings, guided research; Readings: Hannah Arendt, Human Condition; Kenneth Frampton, Megaform as Urban Landscape; Marc Auge, Non-Places; Alexander d’Hooghe, Liberal Monument; Reyner Banham, Megastructures: Urban Futures of the Recent Past; Martijn de Waal, The City as Interface: How Digital Media are Changing the City

    Offered: Year 5 – Spring semester

    Faculty assigned:

    ARCH 225.12, Spring 2014 – Tulay Atak

  • ARCH 225.13

    Advanced Topics

     

    Writing Architecture

    (2 total credits)

    (This course was also offered as ARCH 402 as the Proseminar in the Graduate program, providing undergraduates and graduates the opportunity to explore the topic of architectural writing together.)

    Course Description: Advanced study in history, theory, criticism of architecture, urbanism and technology.

    Course Goals & Objectives: To provide students with a broad exposure to different kinds of writing about architecture; to experiment with writing on architecture through essays, analytical pieces, reviews and other formats; to cast students as critics of the written efforts of their peers; to improve students’ literacy and acuity in the use of text as a means of exploring the architectural subject.

    Student Performance Criterion/a addressed: A1 PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION

    Topical Outline: Textual analysis 25%, Architectural theory 15%, Writing 35%, Review and critique 25%

    Prerequisites: Arch 115 A-B History of Architecture I, Arch 125 A-B History of Architecture II or permission of instructor

    Textbooks/Learning Resources: Adrian Forty, Words and Buildings: A Vocabulary of Modern Architecture; Alexandra Lange, Writing about Architecture: Mastering the Language of Buildings and Cities; Tom Spector and Rebecca Damron, How Architects Write; William Strunk, E.B. White and Maira Kalman, The Elements of Style (illustrated; Carter Wiseman, A Practical Guide to Clear Communication about the Built Environment; William Zinsser, On Writing Well: The classic Guide to Writing Nonfiction

    Offered: Year 5 – Spring semester

    Faculty assigned:

    ARCH 225.13, Spring 2015 – Tamar Zinguer

  • ARCH 225.14

    Advanced Topics

     

    Post-war Architectural Culture

    (2 total credits)

    Course Description: Advanced study in history, theory, criticism of architecture, urbanism and technology.

    Course Goals & Objectives: To impart an in-depth knowledge of major topics in the architectural history of the three decades after World War II through study of visual documents and key texts; to give students a critical understanding of important debates and discourses of the period leading from modernism to postmodernism; to explore the meanings and contexts of “architecture culture” in relation to the past and present from a global perspective; to develop research, writing, oral presentation, and critical thinking skills

    Student Performance Criterion/a addressed: A1 PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION, A6 HISTORICAL TRADITIONS AND GLOBAL CULTURE

    Topical Outline: Architectural history 50%, architectural theory 50%

    Prerequisites: Arch 115 A-B History of Architecture I, Arch 125 A-B History of Architecture II or permission of the instructor

    Textbooks/Learning Resources: Lectures and seminar-format discussion of topics outlined in syllabus. Principal text: Joan Ockman, Architecture Culture 1943–1968: A Documentary Anthology; this book is supplemented by additional short texts as well as films from the postwar period

    Offered: Year 5 – Fall semester

    Faculty assigned:

    ARCH 225.14, Fall 2014 – Joan Ockman

  • ARCH 225.16

    Advanced Topics

     

    Epistemologies of Modern Matter

    (2 total credits)

    Course Description: Advanced study in history, theory, criticism of architecture, urbanism and technology.

    Course Goals & Objectives: To discuss the problematic role that building matter has played in the development of twentieth century architecture. To introduce students to historical discourses on materials, surface, and ornament. To investigate current philosophical, political, and environmental interpretations of matter.

    Student Performance Criterion/a addressed: A1 PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION

    Topical Outline: Art History 25%, Architectural History 25%, Art and Architecture Theory 40%, Building Samples 10%

    Prerequisites: Arch 115 A-B History of Architecture I, Arch 125 A-B History of Architecture II or permission of the instructor

    Textbooks/Learning Resources: Gottfried Semper, Style in the Technical and Tectonic Arts; or, Practical Aesthetics; Aleksei Gan, Constructivism; Georg Lukács, History and Class Consciousness; László Moholy-Nagy, From Pigment to Light; Walter Benjamin, The Arcades Project, Sigfried Giedion, Building in France, Michael A. Tomlan, Twentieth-Century Building Materials, Graham Harman, ed., The Speculative Turn; Eyal Weizman, Forensic Architecture; Diana Coole & Samantha Frost, New Materialisms; Jane Bennett, Vibrant Matter.

    Offered: Year 5 – Spring semester

    Faculty assigned:

    ARCH 225.16, Spring 2015 – Pep Aviles

OPTIONAL STUDIES/GENERAL

  • ARCH 178

    Advanced Drawing

     

    (2 total credits)

    Course Description: The course focuses on the dialogue between figuration and abstraction. Students plan and elaborate a folio of thematic drawings investigating a broad spectrum of imagery and media.

    Course Goals & Objectives: To plot and elaborate a series of drawings based on individually selected themes. To hone and expand existing proficiency in drawing and to take risks in exploring new and unfamiliar media. To employ the discipline of drawing both as a laboratory and playground to expand the creative mind.

    Student Performance Criterion/a addressed: N/A

    Topical Outline: Development of thematic exploration through drawing 40%, Development of technical skill and mastery of media 30%, Artist exemplar research 15%, Development of critical judgment through peer discussion 15%

    Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor

    Textbooks/Learning Resources: Primary learning resources: Group critiques, individual reviews, discussion of pedagogical goals, peer discussion, Guest critics. Books: Alberto Giacometti Drawings (James Lord), Architects Draw (Sue Ferguson Gussow), Drawings of Michaelangelo: 103 Drawings in Facsimile (G. Brazilier, Important Information Inside: the Art of John F. Peto and the Idea of Still-life Painting in Nineteenth Century America (John Wilmerding), Mondrian: Flowers (David Shapiro), William Kentridge (MoCA), William Kentridge: Five Themes (SF MoMA), William Kentridge – Trace: Five Prints from the MoMA (Judith B Hecker), Women of the Avante-Garde 1920-1940 (Michael Juul Holm)

    Offered: Years 3 to 5, Fall semester

    Faculty assigned:

    ARCH 178, Fall 2013 – Sue Gussow

    ARCH 178, Fall 2014– Sue Gussow

OPTIONAL STUDIES/PROFESSIONAL

  • ARCH 165

    Analysis of Architectural Texts

     

    (2 total credits)

    Course Description: Introduction to analytical methods and techniques and their relationship to synthetic activity in the design process.

    Course Goals & Objectives: ARCHITECTURE : MODES OF THOUGHT Analysis of selected texts in architecture and its culture from Antiquity to the present. Drawn from works in architectural, social, political, and aesthetic theory the course will deepen our understanding of historical architecture and open up ways of interpreting contemporary design culture. Each architectural text will be read with (or against) a critical inter text that places it in context a close reading of these pairs, together with designs that they inspired, will open reflection and discussion of the ways in which architecture as a design practice has developed its own intellectual discourse - one which demands continual renewal and constant re-thinking. Impart an understanding of the various ways in which “architecture” has been thought of in theory and practice, historically and today, both inside and outside the profession, with examples taken from the history of theory. Understand the intellectual and cultural context of architectural thought, historically in the contemporary world; develop skills in the close of texts related to analytical skills in architectural design.

    Student Performance Criterion/a addressed: N/A

    Topical Outline: History of Architectural Theory 50%, Intellectual and Cultural Context 20%, Analytical skills 20%, Literary analysis 10%

    Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor

    Textbooks/Learning Resources: Vitruvius Ten Books, Alberti's On Building, Palladia's Four Books, Ledoux's Architecture, Ruskin's Stones of Venice, Le Corbusier's Towards an Architecture, Loos's Spoken in the Void, Rowe's Mathematics of the Ideal Villa, Tafuri's Theories and History, Rossi's ScientificAutobi ography, Koolhaas's Deliriou s New York

    Offered: Years 3 to 5, Fall semester

    Faculty assigned:

    Fall 2014 – Anthony Vidler

  • ARCH 177

    Computer Graphics, Image Processing and Vision

     

    (2 total credits)

    Course Description: Introduction and advanced topics to “hand-eye axis” in computer- based drawing and organizational abstract algorithmic systems.

    Course Goals & Objectives: This course researches cognitive problems specific to architecture, alternating its subject each year between landscape urbanism through ecology and architecture multidimensionality through surface topology. This course description refers to the course on multidimensional space. This advanced content-oriented workshop will critically relate formal autonomy to problems of representation, studying the constitution of space through multiple dimensions of spatial representation and reference, from 1D to 2D, to 3D to 4D to nD. Concepts of information, information transferring, information actualization, interfaces, surface scripting, parametric design, algorithms structures and processing rely on digital strategies between different media and certain software interfaces but also critical relationships between analog techniques and digital fabrication. Time-based sequential diagrams indexing the constitution of the design are studied with animated topological constructions and virtual navigations.

    Student Performance Criterion/a addressed: A1 PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION, A2 DESIGN THINKING SKILLS, A3 INVESTIGATE SKILLS AND APPLIED RESEARCH, A4 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN SKILLS, A5 USE OF PRECEDENTS, B6 ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS, B7 STRUCTURAL SYSTEMS, B8 BUILDING ENVELOPE SYSTEMS AND ASSEMBLIES, C1 RESEARCH

    Topical Outline: Architecture design 30%; Displacement of algorithmic precedent 30%; implementation and displacement of Architecture Canon/s in relation to computation 20%; computational theory 20%

    Prerequisites: Open to all students

    Textbooks/Learning Resources: ACADIA 2010 Conference Proceedings and Catalog; ed. Aaron Sprecher, Shai Yeshayahu and Pablo Lorenzo-Eiroa, ACADIA New York, 2010; Architecture In Formation, Ed. Pablo Lorenzo-Eiroa and Aaron Sprecher, Routledge London 2013.

    Offered: Years 3 to 5, Spring semester

    Faculty assigned:

    ARCH 177, Spring 2014 – Pablo Lorenzo-Eiroa

    ARCH 177, Spring 2015 – Pablo Lorenzo-Eiroa

  • ARCH 185.05

    Crossings

     

    (2 total credits)

    Course Description: Project-oriented course explores and investigates developments in architecture, art, literature and engineering that reinforce or reintroduce the interrelationships of these diverse disciplines.

    Course Goals & Objectives: This course explores, investigates, and resurrects drawing as a means of thinking and inquiry by way of readings, museum visits and sketching experiments. This project-oriented studio course will explore and investigate developments in architecture, art, literature and engineering that reinforce or reintroduce the interrelationships of these diverse disciplines including the implications of recent scientific developments that cross and disrupt established boundaries and foundations of compartmentalized disciplines, giving us new insights into the natural processes within the rich diversity of nature. A revitalized and stimulating field of inquiry is now offered to architects, artists and engineers, with technological and cultural implications.

    Student Performance Criterion/a addressed: A2 DESIGN THINKING SKILLS, A3 INVESTIGATIVE SKILLS/APPLIED RESEARCH, A6 USE OF PRECEDENTS, A7 GLOBAL CULTURE, A8 CULTURAL DIVERSITY

    Topical Outline: Design Precedents 60%, Architectural Theory 20%, Investigative Skills/Research 20%

    Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor

    Textbooks/Learning Resources: Boom, P. The Origins of Good and Evil, Wilkinson, T.Bricks and Mortals, Newman, O. Defensible space, Wolfe, T. From Bauhaus To Our House

    Offered: Years 3 to 5, Spring semester

    Faculty assigned:

    Spring 2015 – Roderick Knox

  • ARCH 185.06

    Crossings

     

    (2 total credits)

    Course Description: Project-oriented course explores and investigates developments in architecture, art, literature and engineering that reinforce or reintroduce the interrelationships of these diverse disciplines.

    Course Goals & Objectives: The course is exploring intersections within art, architecture and landscape by establishing a double discourse, moving from sculpture towards architecture and from architecture towards sculpture. The aim of this course is to venture into this field of intersecting realms by exploring its inherent, yet dormant, potential and unveiling spatial conditions that do not emanate from programmatic constraints but from considering architecture as an inhabitable gesture, the reach of which can far exceed its physical delineation. The intention is to establish a double discourse, moving from sculpture towards architecture and from architecture towards sculpture, thus allowing the perspective to continually change and thereby broaden the overall understanding of the field. Another objective is engaging in direct interactions with the world, both through observations of existing conditions and through project-based, full-scale experiments.

    Student Performance Criterion/a addressed: Elective course

    Topical Outline: Talks/ Class discussions (Course professors and invited guests) 30%, Exercises/Assignments (Readings 1-8) 40%, Fieldtrips/workshops (FDR, The Noguchi Museum, DiaBeacon, MassMoca, OMI, Storm King) 30%

    Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor

    Textbooks/Learning Resources: Retracing the Expanded Field - Encounters between Art and Architecture, Edited by Spyros Papapetros and Julian Rose, MIT Press, 2014. Field Conditions, Stan Allen, 1997. A Tour of the Monuments of Passaic, New Jersey, Robert Smithson, 1967.

    Offered: Years 3 to 5, Spring semester

    Faculty assigned:

    ARCH 185.06, Spring 2015 – Rikke Jorgensen

  • PH 165-6

    Concepts of Physics

     

    (2 credits per semester, 4 total credits)

    Course Description: An introduction to physics with an emphasis on statics and dynamics.

    Course Goals & Objectives: Basic classical physics that covers such topics as motion, force, momentum, energy, angular motion, fluids, waves, sound, thermodynamics, electricity and light. To get a better feeling for the size of things. To get a better understanding of what we know and how we came to know it.

    Student Performance Criterion/a addressed: N/A

    Topical Outline: Mechanics (motion, force, momentum, energy) 40%, Fluids 10%, Waves & Sound 10%, Thermodynamics 20%, Electricity 10%, Light 10%

    Prerequisites: None

    Textbooks/Learning Resources: College Physics, by R. Serway and J. Faughn, 5th or 6th edition.

    Offered: Year 2 - Fall and Spring semesters

    Faculty assigned:

    PH 165, Fall 2013 – Steven Kreis

    PH 166, Spring 2014 – Steven Kreis

    PH 165, Fall 2014 – Steven Kreis

    PH 166, Spring 2015 – Steven Kreis

 

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  • Founded by inventor, industrialist and philanthropist Peter Cooper in 1859, The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art offers education in art, architecture and engineering, as well as courses in the humanities and social sciences.

  • “My feelings, my desires, my hopes, embrace humanity throughout the world,” Peter Cooper proclaimed in a speech in 1853. He looked forward to a time when, “knowledge shall cover the earth as waters cover the great deep.”

  • From its beginnings, Cooper Union was a unique institution, dedicated to founder Peter Cooper's proposition that education is the key not only to personal prosperity but to civic virtue and harmony.

  • Peter Cooper wanted his graduates to acquire the technical mastery and entrepreneurial skills, enrich their intellects and spark their creativity, and develop a sense of social justice that would translate into action.