Ulrike Müller

Alex Katz Chair in Painting (Fall 2019)

Ulrike Müller’s work complicates conventional expectations. Her paintings and drawings destabilize highly prized concepts such as originality, autonomy, and authorship. Müller shifts her formal vocabulary between material and affective states and makes use of a variety of materials and techniques. Alongside small-scale paintings in baked enamel, she also produces expansive wall paintings, publications, prints, and textiles.

Müller studied art at the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna, Austria, and participated in the Whitney Museum Independent Study Program, New York. She was a co-editor of the queer feminist journal LTTR and organized Herstory Inventory. 100 Feminist Drawings by 100 Artists, a collaborative project that was exhibited together with objects from the respective collections at the Brooklyn Museum and at the Kunsthaus Bregenz in 2012.

Recent solo exhibitions include Museum of Modern Art Ludwig Foundation (Mumok), Vienna, Austria (2015) and Kunstverein Düsseldorf, Germany (2018). At Mumok, Müller, together with Manuela Ammer, co-curated the collection exhibition Always, Always, Others. Non-Classical Forays into Modernism (2015). Her work was included in the 2017 Whitney Biennial and in the 2019 Carnegie International.

Diavolaki, Monotype, 29x22 inches, printed with 10 Grand Press in Santa Fe, NM
Diavolaki, Monotype, 29x22 inches, printed with 10 Grand Press in Santa Fe, NM

 

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