Stephan Pascher

Adjunct Instructor

Stephan Pascher is an artist, writer, and educator, with projects that incorporate a wide range of materials, media, and forms: from installation to photography, drawing, and printed matter. Over the past two decades Pascher’s work has been exhibited internationally at many venues, most recently at Henry Taylors (Los Angeles), Aritsts Space, Cuturegest (Lisbon), Kunstmuseum Basel, Steven Wolf Gallery (San Francisco), and Orchard (New York). Pascher has written on art, film, and a variety of cultural issues, with texts appearing in numerous publications including Afterall, Art in America, Springerin, Merge, Metropolis, The Museum as Arena: Artists on Institutional Critique (Verlag der Walther König), and Institutional Critique: An Anthology of Artists’ Writings (MIT Press). He is on the Board of the Michael Asher Foundation. He’s lectured and appeared on a number of panels worldwide. Since 1999, Pascher has been teaching in university art departments and art schools across the United States and Europe. These include Cooper Union, Columbia University, Rutgers University, Malmö Art Academy, The University of Chicago, the Art Institute of Chicago, and Sotheby’s Institute of Art. He divides his time between New York and Marfa, Texas.

The LA Arts District on Fire, 2016, watercolor on paper, 52 1/2 inches by 132 inches
The LA Arts District on Fire, 2016, watercolor on paper, 52 1/2 inches by 132 inches

 

  • Founded by inventor, industrialist and philanthropist Peter Cooper in 1859, The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art offers education in art, architecture and engineering, as well as courses in the humanities and social sciences.

  • “My feelings, my desires, my hopes, embrace humanity throughout the world,” Peter Cooper proclaimed in a speech in 1853. He looked forward to a time when, “knowledge shall cover the earth as waters cover the great deep.”

  • From its beginnings, Cooper Union was a unique institution, dedicated to founder Peter Cooper's proposition that education is the key not only to personal prosperity but to civic virtue and harmony.

  • Peter Cooper wanted his graduates to acquire the technical mastery and entrepreneurial skills, enrich their intellects and spark their creativity, and develop a sense of social justice that would translate into action.