Nat Ward

Adjunct Instructor

Nat Ward (b. 1983, Philadelphia) works with photographs and writing to examine social and physical landscapes where a desire for self-preservation motivates exile, where collective alienation finds its logical conclusion in the subtleties of individually isolated, personal defeat, and how these spaces are informed by and inextricably woven into histories of violence and exploitation.

Ward recently exhibited work at the Ford Foundation Live Gallery, Nathalie Karg Gallery, and The Jewish Museum. He has been awarded residencies at the Edward F. Albee Foundation, LES Studio Program, a program of Artist Alliance Inc., The Sharpe-Wallentas Studio Program, and The Wagon Station Encampment at AZ West. Ward received an M.F.A. from Columbia University and a BFA from New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts.

A Nationless Place (detail), 2017. Adhesive pigment prints, vinyl letters, 10 x 32 feet. Image courtesy the artist and New York Live Arts
A Nationless Place (detail), 2017. Adhesive pigment prints, vinyl letters, 10 x 32 feet. Image courtesy the artist and New York Live Arts.

 

  • Founded by inventor, industrialist and philanthropist Peter Cooper in 1859, The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art offers education in art, architecture and engineering, as well as courses in the humanities and social sciences.

  • “My feelings, my desires, my hopes, embrace humanity throughout the world,” Peter Cooper proclaimed in a speech in 1853. He looked forward to a time when, “knowledge shall cover the earth as waters cover the great deep.”

  • From its beginnings, Cooper Union was a unique institution, dedicated to founder Peter Cooper's proposition that education is the key not only to personal prosperity but to civic virtue and harmony.

  • Peter Cooper wanted his graduates to acquire the technical mastery and entrepreneurial skills, enrich their intellects and spark their creativity, and develop a sense of social justice that would translate into action.