Professor Coco Fusco Receives Inaugural Latinx Artist Fellowship

POSTED ON: July 12, 2021

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Coco Fusco in the classroom

Professor Coco Fusco in the classroom. Photo by Kathryn Gamble

Coco Fusco, professor in the School of Art, has been named a Latinx Artist Fellow and will receive a grant of $50,000 in unrestricted funds to support her work. The newly established and first-of-its-kind fellowship recognizes 15 of the most compelling Latinx visual artists (individuals of Latin American or Caribbean descent, born or living in the United States) that are working in the United States today. In addition to Professor Fusco, Juan Sánchez A’77 was named to the inaugural class of fellows. Artists were selected by a jury of art historians, scholars, and curators at partner organizations.

Despite a centuries-long history of contributions to American art, Latinx artists have been consistently marginalized within American art history. The new fellowship aims to address this systemic lack of support, visibility, and patronage of Latinx visual artists. It is supported by the The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and the Ford Foundation and administered by the U.S. Latinx Art Forum (USLAF) in collaboration with the New York Foundation for the Arts.

  • Founded by inventor, industrialist and philanthropist Peter Cooper in 1859, The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art offers education in art, architecture and engineering, as well as courses in the humanities and social sciences.

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  • Peter Cooper wanted his graduates to acquire the technical mastery and entrepreneurial skills, enrich their intellects and spark their creativity, and develop a sense of social justice that would translate into action.