Lecture by Ursula von Rydingsvard

Tuesday, May 12, 2015, 7 - 9pm

Add to Calendar

Ursula von Rydingsvard, Ona | photo by Piotr Redlinski

Ursula von Rydingsvard, Ona | photo by Piotr Redlinski

Co-sponsored by the Architectural League of New York.

The Wendy Evans Joseph Lecture on Art and Architecture presents the work of an artist whose work is inspired by the built environment. On May 12, artist Ursula von Rydingsvard will present her recent work in this public lecture.

Ursula von Rydingsvard is a sculptor based in Brooklyn. As noted by Galerie Lelong, the meaning behind her work is rooted in personal experience. “She creates large-scale sculpture from cedar beams which she cuts, assembles, and laminates, finally rubbing powdered graphite into the work’s textured, faceted surfaces. Born in Germany in 1942, von Rydingsvard and her family were among the dispossessed that, after the war, were forced to move from one refugee camp for displaced Poles to another, eventually settling in the United States in 1950. The artist’s respect for organic materials and the dignity of labor, sense of loss and pain, and the persistent memories that inform her work may be traced back to these formative experiences.”

Her sculpture is included in numerous permanent collections, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art; Museum of Modern Art; Whitney Museum of American Art; Brooklyn Museum; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City; High Museum of Art, Atlanta; Detroit Institute of Arts; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Crystal Bridges Museum, Bentonville, Arkansas; and National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C. Recent exhibitions include Ursula von Rydingsvard: Sculpture 1991-2009 at Sculpture Center, New York; as well as the installation of Ona, a bronze, outdoor sculpture installed at the Barclays Center, Brooklyn.

Free for current students/faculty/staff of The Cooper Union and League members.

Located in the Frederick P. Rose Auditorium, at 41 Cooper Square (on Third Avenue between 6th and 7th Streets)

  • Founded by inventor, industrialist and philanthropist Peter Cooper in 1859, The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art offers education in art, architecture and engineering, as well as courses in the humanities and social sciences.

  • “My feelings, my desires, my hopes, embrace humanity throughout the world,” Peter Cooper proclaimed in a speech in 1853. He looked forward to a time when, “knowledge shall cover the earth as waters cover the great deep.”

  • From its beginnings, Cooper Union was a unique institution, dedicated to founder Peter Cooper's proposition that education is the key not only to personal prosperity but to civic virtue and harmony.

  • Peter Cooper wanted his graduates to acquire the technical mastery and entrepreneurial skills, enrich their intellects and spark their creativity, and develop a sense of social justice that would translate into action.