Shigeru Ban AR'84 on His Current Works

Wednesday, June 17, 2015, 7 - 8pm

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Shigeru Ban Architects, Japan Pavilion, Expo 2000 | photo by Hiroyuki Hirai

Shigeru Ban Architects, Japan Pavilion, Expo 2000 | photo by Hiroyuki Hirai

Shigeru Ban AR'84 will speak about his current projects in a lecture co-sponsored by The Irwin S. Chanin School of Architecture and the Architectural League of New York

With a portfolio that spans diverse scales, from refugee housing and other temporary structures, to houses, commercial structures, and cultural facilities, Shigeru Ban’s work is united by structural innovation, creative use of unconventional building materials, and environmental sensitivity. The 2014 winner of the Pritzker Prize, Ban was lauded by the jury for “his respect for the people who inhabit his buildings, whether victims of natural disaster or private clients or the public…always revealed through his thoughtful approach, functional plans, carefully selected appropriate materials, and the richness of the spaces he creates.”

Shigeru Ban founded Tokyo-based Shigeru Ban Architects in 1982. The firm has since expanded to New York and Paris. He became a consultant to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees in 1995 and founded the NGO Voluntary Architects’ Network in the same year to support disaster relief. Notable projects include: Japan Pavilion, Expo 2000, Hannover; Nomadic Museum, New York; Seikei University Library and Nicolas G Hayek Center, both in Tokyo; Paper Temporary School/Hualin Elementary School, Chengdu; Centre Pompidou-Metz; Container Temporary Housing, Onagawa, Japan; Paper Partition System 4 for Evacuation Facilities, East Japan; Cardboard Cathedral, Christchurch, New Zealand; Aspen Art Museum; and Oita Prefectural Art Museum, Oita, Japan.

Free for current student/faculty/staff of The Cooper Union and League members.

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