Course Listings


Foundation

Foundation courses are required of all first year students.

  • FA 100.1, FA 100.2

    Introduction to Techniques

    An introduction to the physical aspects of working with wood, metal, plaster - and plastics, as well as an introduction to on-campus computer facilities and resources. A basic introduction to the Adobe interface, specifically Photoshop and Illustrator will be provided.

    Required for first year students. 1/2 credit per semester. One-year course. Pass/Fail. Staff

  • FA 101

    Color

    A study of the physical, perceptual, art historical and cultural aspects of color. The phenomenon of color and principles of light are explored in various media towards an understanding of color application in all of the fine art disciplines and architecture.

    Required for first year students. 2 credits. Fall only. Ellis/Hewitt/Osinski

  • FA 102.1 FA 102.2

    Two-Dimensional Design

    Exploration of the visual and intellectual aspects of form on the two-dimensional surface, in a variety of media. Investigations into the relationships of perception, process and presentation.

    Required for first year students. 3 credits per semester. One-year course. Morton/Rub/Tochilovsky/Lessard

  • FA 104.1, FA 104.2

    Basic Drawing (Analytical and Descriptive)

    A course in freehand drawing designed to emphasize perceptual and inventive skills in all drawing media.

    Required for first year students. 3 credits per semester. One-year course. Brown/Masnyj/Morgan/Villalongo

  • FA 105

    Four-Dimensional Design

    This course investigates the properties of time and movement and the fundamentals of four-dimensional design. Students explore duration, condensation, expansion, interruption, simultaneity, stillness, action and situation through a wide range of materials.

    Required for first year students. 3 credits. Spring only. Issa/Lehyt/Magid/Raad/Raven

  • FA 109.1, FA 109.2

    Three-Dimensional Design

    Students work on projects that explore the fundamentals of forms and space and investigate the properties of materials, structure, mass, scale, light and motion.

    Required for first year students. 3 credits per semester. One-year course. Adams/ Duerksen/Farmiga/Lins

  • HTA 101

    Modern to Contemporary

    This two-semester Art Historycore course, developed as part of the Foundation year for students in the School of Art but open to all students, is organized around a set of themes running through the history of modernity from the 18th century to the present. Within specific themes, significant works, figures and works in art/design will be presented chronologically. Students will be able to identify and critically evaluate significant works, figures and movements in art/design in the modern period; be able to describe the main social and political contexts for the changes in art/design over the last two hundred years; and engage, in writing and class discussion, with theoretical perspectives on art/design production. The course will involve museum visits.

    Required for first year students. 2 credits.

  • SE 150

    Foundation Project

    A course that brings together all Foundation year students around a series of presentations that introduce various artistic practices, critical languages, and criticism. The course intends to present contrasting historical and contemporary models of creating, seeing, speaking and thinking about art.

    Required for first year students. 1 credit. Fall semester only. Raad/Bordo


Drawing

  • FA 240.1A, FA 240.1B

    Drawing I

    The course is designed to explore the phenomena of drawing as basic to the visual language of all disciplines. The fundamental notion of observation and analysis in drawing is investigated. As preparation for work in an advanced level, the course involves further development of drawing skills and techniques, as well as an emphasis on individual aesthetic development. Assignments and group critiques are central to the course.

    3 credits per semester. One-semester course. May be repeated once. Prerequisite to all Advanced Drawing. Cornejo/Gleeson/Leary/Morgan

  • FA 341A, FA 341B

    Advanced Drawing

    Advanced studies in drawing emphasizing the student’s conceptual independence from traditional draftsmanship. This course is for students who have an established direction in drawing.

    3 credits. One-semester course. Barth

  • FA 342A, FA 342B

    Advanced Drawing

    Students are encouraged to explore and experiment with drawing as a way to further develop visual understanding of pictorial and sculptural space. The issues surrounding representation and perception are addressed. The focus of this class is to help students to use drawing as a critical and procedural tool. Using notebooks and journals as well as reading and research methods to process ideas, students will work with drawing to advance and integrate their individual studio practice both technically and conceptually. Group critiques and drawing sessions as well as individual meetings with the instructor are integral components of the course.

    3 credits. One-semester course. Bordo

  • FA 343A, FA 343B

    Advanced Drawing

    Offered to students working independently in any medium. Must be self-motivated. There will be group and individual critiques.

    3 credits. One-semester course. Masnyj

  • FA 345A, FA 345B

    Advanced Drawing: Guest Artist Series

    This course is intended to help students clarify and further the growth of their own work through group and individual critiques, classroom presentations and discussions with contemporary guest artists and the instructor.

    3 credits. One-semester course. Gleeson

  • FA 346A, FA 346B

    Advanced Drawing

    Offered to students working independently in any medium. Must be self-motivated. There will be group and individual critiques.

    3 credits. One-semester course. Goldberg

  • FA 347A, FA 347B

    Advanced Drawing

    Offered to students working independently in any medium. Must be self-motivated. There will be group and individual critiques.

    3 credits. One-semester course. Gleeson

  • FA 348A, FA 348B

    Advanced Drawing

    Offered to students working independently in any medium. Must be self-motivated. There will be group and individual critiques

    3 credits. One-semester course. True

  • FA 499

    Independent Study in Drawing

    1-3 credits. Requires approval of instructor and the Dean of the School of Art


Film/Video

  • FA 208

    Video I

    An introduction to video production, postproduction, history and criticism. Students are introduced to basic camera operations, sound recording and lighting, as well as to basic editing using Apple’s Final Cut Pro software, and to DVD production using Apple’s DVD Studio Pro. Three assignments are to be completed during the semester: two are assigned in conjunction with the professor. Critiques of the assignments are crucial to the course as students are expected to speak at length about the formal, technical, critical and historical dimensions of their works. Weekly readings in philosophy, critical theory, artist statements and literature are assigned. The course will also include weekly screenings of films and videos, introducing students to the history of video art as well as to other contemporary art practices. Note: Video I is required for all students who wish to pursue additional work in the medium.

    3 credits. One-semester course. May not be repeated. Prerequisite to Video II. Ghani/McWreath Note: Video I is required for all students who wish to pursue additional work in the medium.

  • FA 209

    Video II

    Students develop shooting and editing skills with an emphasis on using digital camcorders and digital non-linear editing and compositing systems. A sequence of short assignments introduces students to specific digital techniques and a range of software. Students will also begin developing their personal conceptual orientation and vocabulary. Students will complete a series of short videos, as well as explore both mainstream and experimental approaches to the moving image.

    3 credits. May not be repeated. Prerequisite: Video I. Olujimi

  • FA 270.1

    Film I

    An introduction to the techniques and aesthetics of filmmaking. In a mixture of theory and practice, participants will be required to produce at least two film projects in response to concepts and issues raised. The course is in three parts: technical instruction, critique and screenings of artists’ work. Students are trained in all aspects of filmmaking from shooting, lighting and sound to editing in film or on computer and DVD authoring. There are weekly reviews of student works-in-progress and each class will include survey of the history of artists working in film.Note: Film I is required of all students who wish to pursue additional work in the medium.

    3 credits. One-semester course. May not be repeated. Prerequisite to all advanced film courses. Pre- or corequisite to Animation I. McLaren/Simpson

  • FA 375

    Film II

    This introduction to 16 mm filmmaking covers a wide range of techniques such as shooting with the reflex Bolex, lighting, single-frame construction, sound and editing. Students learn16mm filmmaking with hands-on experience and are encouraged to use the unique qualities of the medium to express their original visions. This course integrates theory and analysis of cinematic language with film practice. Films made by independent filmmakers and artists will be screened and discussed and advanced filmmaking techniques such as optical printing and multiple-exposure will be taught. Critiques of student work will take place at various points during the semester and students are required to complete their own final 16mm sound film by the end of the course.

    3 credits. May not be repeated. Prerequisite: Film I. Perlin

  • FA 376A

    Animation I

    Students will learn an arsenal of physically-based film animation techniques from line animation, directon-film and roto-scoping to cut-out animation. Students will apply their skills and passions based in their own work in other art forms (drawing, painting, photography) and will make a few short animation projects over the semester. The course emphasizes the creation of meaningful and realized films through the integration of content and ideas with aesthetics and technique. All animation artwork will be created non-digitally, though students will learn to shoot and finish their projects both digitally and to film. Classes will incorporate basic technical instruction, viewings and discussions about a variety of classic and contemporary animation films, hands on animation work and critiques.

    3 credits. May not be repeated. Reeves

  • FA 376B

    Animation II

    Students will create and complete individual advanced animations, utilizing and building upon techniques learned in Animation I. Through presentations and critique, screenings of classic and inventive animations, and in-class work, students will broaden their perception and command of animation language and practice. Several animation techniques will be introduced. Projects begun in Animation I may be expanded in Animation II. The class will have a screening at the end of the semester to exhibit their completed projects.

    3 credits. Prerequisites: Film I or Video I; Animation I, or permission of the instructor. Reeves

  • FA 377A, FA 377B

    Advanced Film

    Independent projects workshop in Super 8 and 16mm film. As well as working in depth with film, students are encouraged to explore all possibilities of the moving image from expanded projection techniques to kinetic constructions.

    3 credits. One-semester course. May be repeated. Prerequisites: Film I and one of the following: Film II or Animation II. Visiting Artist Claudia Joskowicz/ Raven

  • FA 380A, FA 380B

    Advanced Video

    Advanced students use all the facilities of the video lab and continue to develop their personal styles through close individual instruction. Students complete two fully realized independent projects. Analysis and discussion of current video exhibitions supports group critiques.

    3 credits. One-semester course. May be repeated. Prerequisite: Video II. Visiting Artist Claudia Joskowicz/Raven

  • FA 381

    Digital Sound Design Workshop

    An investigation of the structures of the sounds around us and how to listen to, analyze and manipulate them, with special emphasis on sound for picture. Discussion of how the gulf between the sounds of the environment and composed music was bridged in the 20th century. Training in the use of Protools, an all-inclusive system for recording, editing and mixing sound, which has become the system of choice in the modern studio.

    3 credits. Offered Fall and Spring. Pre- or corequisite: Film I or Video I or Motion Graphics. May not be repeated. J. Burckhardt

  • FA 382A, FA 382B

    The Question of the Document

    This class is open to students working in all forms. Students are expected to initiate and work on independent projects—individually or in groups and must be willing to show work in class while in the process of making it. The focus of the class will be on the question of the document in media art and related themes of history, facticity, testimony, witnessing and evidence. Students are expected to attend all screenings and exhibitions, keep up with the assigned readings and write short papers.

    3 credits. Pre- or corequisite: One advanced studio course. May be repeated with a different instructor Raad

  • FA 479A, FA 479B

    Independent Study in Film

    1-3 credits. Requires approval of instructor and the Dean of the School of Art

  • FA 489A, FA 489B

    Independent Study in Video

    1-3 credits. Requires approval of instructor and the Dean of the School of Art


Graphic Design

  • FA 211

    Graphic Design I

    An introduction to the techniques and visual language of graphic design. Weekly projects explore fundamental concepts in form, composition, and typography. Presentations and readings in graphic design history will complement weekly assignments. Students will explore basic imagemaking processes as well as be instructed in digital production techniques.

    3 credits. Fall only. Essl/Gasparska

  • FA 212

    Graphic Design II

    The complex relationship between word and image is explored. The study of semiotics, emphasizing the philosophy of communication, provides a rich historical and intellectual base for experimental projects combining verbal and pictorial information. Weekly projects reflect a broad range of disciplines within the field of design. Computer instruction will be provided as it relates to specific projects.

    3 credits. Spring only. Prerequisite: Graphic Design I. Essl/Gasparska

  • FA 215

    Typography

    Empirical explorations of typographic messages through placement, massing, weight, size and color are analyzed to develop an understanding of aesthetic composition of typographic form and meaning. Legibility, unpredictability and sequencing, as well as the use of grid structures, are investigated. The development of critical judgment about typography is emphasized.

    3 credits. Prerequisite: Graphic Design I. Pre- or corequisite: Graphic Design II. Tochilovsky

  • FA 310

    Information Design

    The visual communication of complex information is introduced through presentations and studio projects that explore organizational structures such as charts, diagrams, maps, illustrations, photographs and typography. Computer instruction will be provided as it relates to specific projects.

    3 credits. Prerequisites: Graphic Design I and II. Pre- or co-requisite: Typography. Glauber

  • FA 311

    Publication Design

    The complex issues unique to editorial and publication design are explored through studio projects and presentations that emphasize the grid, effective sequencing and typographic form. Computer instruction will be provided as it relates to specific projects.

    3 credits. Spring only. Prerequisites: Graphic Design I and II. Pre- or corequisite: Typography. TBA

  • FA 312

    Experimental Typography

    This course will emphasize innovation, imagination and creativity in the realm of typography, manipulating it freely as a means of expression. Computer techniques as well as hand drawing, collages and pictures will be used to compose layouts, including posters, limited art books and animated typography for the web. Students will choose a theme and develop it with abstract type expression.

    3 credits. Prerequisite: Graphic Design I and II. Pre- or corequisite:Typography. TBA

  • FA 313

    Art of the Book

    In this course the book will be explored as an interdisciplinary medium, placing emphasis on integrating and experimenting with form, content, structure and ideas. During the first half of the semester, students will make a number of books, examining sequence, series and text/image relationships, using various book structures. These “sketches” will prepare students for an extended book project during the second half of the term.

    3 credits. Fall only. Morton

  • FA 315A

    Advanced Design: Web Design

    In this course students will complete two fully realized independent projects. Emphasis will be placed on contemporary graphic design practices and developing a personal aesthetic. Visiting lecturers, readings, and individual meetings with the instructor will complement group critiques.

    3 credits. Prerequisites: Graphic Design II. Pre- or corequisite: Typography. Bergdoll

  • FA 315B

    Advanced Design: Game Design

    Play is a voluntary activity enjoyed by animals and humans alike. Games have been around for centuries offering structured play and have been used for entertainment, skill building, learning and more. The course explores how the game experience and the reward systems are designed with human pleasure/fun as the motivating factor. The course starts by familiarizing with the different genres of games from board games, card games to video games and console games and their history. It explores the concepts that govern game design and building blocks of games in each genre. Weekly projects dive into creating prototypes of different games followed by tests run in class to validate and iterate on the design.

    3 credits. Prerequisite: Graphic Design II. Pre- or corequisite: Typography I. Udayasankar

  • FA 317A, FA 317B

    Advanced Design: Open Studio

    In this course students will complete two fully realized independent projects. Emphasis will be placed on contemporary graphic design practices and developing a personal aesthetic. Visiting lecturers, readings, and individual meetings with the instructor will complement group critiques.

    3 credits. Prerequisites: Graphic Design I and II. Pre- or corequisite: Typography. For Fall 2016: Stanton Chair Geoff Kaplan

  • FA 320

    Visual Identities Design

    The class will concentrate on innovative solutions to graphic identity systems. Students will increase their proficiency in developing symbols and typography to build a visual language that amplifies the narrative of a company, organization or product.

    3 credits. Prerequisites: Graphic Design I and II. Pre- or corequisite: Typography. Derose

  • FA 322A, FA 322B

    Professional Practice

    Graphic design projects for non-profit institutions, under the direction of faculty and in cooperation with the staff of the Center for Design and Typography, provide students with an opportunity for professional experience. Portfolio presentation and professional ethics will be addressed.

    3 credits. One-semester course. Prerequisites: Graphic Design I and II. Pre- or corequisite: Typography. Lang

  • FA 326

    Interactive Design Concepts

    An exploration of the nature of interactive design and how it informs and transforms experience. Information structures, navigational issues, design strategies and social implications of interactive experiences using traditional as well as electronic media will be examined.

    3 credits. One-semester course. May not be repeated. Prerequisite: Techniques in HTML and Programming or permission of the instructor. Essl

  • FA 327

    Advanced Interactive Design Concepts: Computational Media

    An advanced design course in interactive computational media. The course will explore advanced interactive design concepts utilizing software which that includes Processing and Macromedia Flash as well as XHTML coding. Students will complete two fully realized independent projects. Analysis of relevant work and readings support group critiques.

    3 credits. One-semester course. Prerequisite: Interactive Design Concepts. TBA

  • FA 328

    Motion Graphics

    Students will explore the conceptual and technical challenges of design for the television screen. All aspects of industry video/ broadcast production are introduced and integrated into a design core focused on strong communication. Projects include identity design, combining kinetic typography, animation, sound and video. The course includes workshops in After Effects, Final Cut Pro and Protools.

    3 credits. One-semester course. Prerequisites: Graphic Design I and II. Pre- or corequisite: Typography. Vondracek

  • FA 429A, FA 429B

    Independent Study in Graphic Design

    1-3 credits. Requires approval of instructor and the Dean of the School of Art

  • SE 403A, SE 403B

    Interdisciplinary Seminar

    This course is a hybrid between a lecture series and discussion seminar. It is intended to provide a stimulating and rigorous forum between students’ artistic concerns and those of twelve visiting speakers in a public lecture series of the School of Art. Class discussions will center on diverse presentations by artists, theorists, activists, designers, writers, curators, gallerists and other practitioners involved in the arts from positions that embody an interdisciplinary approach or that imply new uses for disciplinary traditions. Accordingly, the course is designed to introduce students to some of the debates currently driving contemporary art and the larger social context it embodies. Members of the class are expected to be active participants and will therefore be asked to respond with some intellectual invention to a variety of topics with weekly discussions, readings, and written or oral presentations.

    2 credits. Free elective credit. Raad (Sabbatical Spring 2014)

  • TE 306

    Techniques in Letterpress

    This course explores techniques and projects in typesetting. Students will complete projects that demonstrate their skill and understanding of typographic composition and letterpress printing techniques.

    2 Credits. One-Semester course. Cannot be repeated. Free elective credit.

  • TE 324.1

    Design Production: From Digital to Press

    Study of the planning, materials and techniques involved in producing printed material from digital files, transparencies and photographic prints. Familiarizes students with offset lithography’s terminology, options, limitations, costs and trade customs. This course covers line, halftone and color separation theory; scanner functions; Photoshop enhancement of photographs for reproduction; manual film assembly; electronic imposition; proofing, press and paper options; binding techniques; finishing methods; and printing quality evaluation and control throughout the process.

    2 credits. Spring only. May not be repeated. Free elective credit. Sanders


Painting

  • FA 130A, FA 130B

    Painting

    A studio experience with the physical, compositional and conceptual components of pictorial invention and image-making. Readings, assignments and critiques will enhance the development and articulation of an inventive individual approach to the painting discipline in preparation for advanced level work.

    3 credits per semester. One-year course. Prerequisite to all Advanced Painting courses. Bordo Griffin/True/Villalongo

  • FA 331A, FA 331B

    Advanced Painting

    For students who wish to have their work critiqued primarily on an individual basis. High motivation and dedication are of primary concern. There will be occasional group critiques.

    3 credits. One-semester course. True

  • FA 332A

    Advanced Painting/ Visiting Artist

    A seminar course for students who have the ability to work independently in their studios with a primary focus in drawing or painting. Students will be expected to develop their ideas and work independently, but the class will meet together every week or two for discussion of each other’s work, as well as various museum and gallery shows, readings or slide presentations of current work. The course will emphasize experimentation and expansion of one’s visual language and process, and the ability to articulate these ideas in discussion.

    3 credits. One-semester course. Visiting Artist Caitlin Keogh

  • FA 334A, FA 334B

    Advanced Painting

    A seminar course for students who have the ability to work independently in their studios with a primary focus in drawing or painting. Students will be expected to develop their ideas and work independently, but the class will meet together every week or two for discussion of each other’s work, as well as various museum and gallery shows, readings or slide presentations of current work. The course will emphasize experimentation and expansion of one’s visual language and process, and the ability to articulate these ideas in discussion.

    3 credits. One-semester course. Bordo

  • FA 335A

    Advanced Painting

    This class will consider the value of life outside the studio and how those experiences are filtered and assimilated into practice. Time spent in the studio and in review will be balanced with readings, trips and visits. Individual studio and group discussions will focus on the studentsʼ methodology, their critical voice and the play of material problem solving. Through continuing dialogue students will examine within the pluralism of today’s painting practice their own positions and opinions. The course will encompass painting, sculpture and architecture. Students will question the ways in which space is made and perceived. There will be wide range of approaches, (formal, social and political) while using the framework of tradition to question the construction of space.

    3 credits. One-semester course. Visitng Artist Alex Kwartler

  • FA 336A, FA 336B

    Advanced Painting

    For students who wish to have their work critiqued primarily on an individual basis. High motivation and dedication are of primary concern. There will be occasional group critiques.

    3 credits. One-semester course. True

  • FA 337A, FA 337B

    Advanced Painting

    Students will explore the inner reservoirs of the imagination and investigate, as well, specific external resources for imagery. The course will seek to develop a range of expressive vocabulary including representation and abstraction. Group and individual critiques will be augmented through discussions of museum and gallery exhibitions and slide presentations. Emphasis will be upon developing a personal visual direction.

    3 credits. One-semester course. TBA

  • FA 338A, FA 338B

    Advanced Painting/ Water Media

    Students will focus on water media—acrylic, transparent watercolor and gouache—through work on canvas and paper. The class will explore the specific technical challenges and characteristics inherent in these media including the range from transparency to opacity. Individual approaches will be encouraged in developing the aesthetics of the evolving image from spontaneity to studied expression, from figuration to abstraction. Exposure to selected examples of historical and contemporary imagery will be accomplished through slides, exhibitions and gallery or studio visits.

    3 credits. One-semester course. TBA

  • FA 339A, FA 339B

    Advanced Painting/ Guest Artist Series

    This course is for students who have made a strong commitment to painting. Students are expected to work independently in their studios on a series of paintings that will develop during the semester in response to a dialogue with the different guest artists.

    3 credits. One-semester course. Bordo

  • FA 439A, FA 339B

    Independent Study in Painting

    1-3 credits. Requires approval of instructor and the Dean of the School of Art

  • TE 418.1

    Water Media Techniques

    This course provides a foundation for techniques, processes and materials involved in painting with watercolor, gouache and acrylic. The class explores the specific technical challenges and characteristics inherent in these media, including the range from transparency to opacity. Acquaintance with a wide range of brushes, tools, materials, pigments and papers will be offered. A range of approaches will be introduced from traditional to experimental so that the student can acquire mastery of the medium through a variety of experiences. The relevance of technique and imagery to each student’s personal work and interests will be developed through discussions and resource examples.

    2 credits. One-semester course. May not be repeated. Free elective credit. L.A. Miller


Photography

  • FA 106

    Photography I

    A one-semester course which explores the visual language of photography through both black-and-white and color mediums. Students will learn camera controls through the use of 4x5 and digital cameras. 35mm cameras are optional. Darkroom printing augments class assignments and student projects.*

    *It is recommended that students have digital cameras. Instructors will make camera recommendations on the first day of class for those students who may wish to purchase one. 3 credits. One-semester only. May not be repeated. Mickey/Osinski

  • FA 360

    Advanced Photography: Printing Images

    This course will focus on the materiality of the photographic print, both analog and digital. Options in silver-gelatin printing including toning, bleaching and plating, as well as advanced options in digital printing will broaden students’ understanding of the photographic image. Issues involving photographic representation will be addressed through discussions, group and individual critiques, hands-on demonstrations and field trips. Students will produce a finished set of printed images by the end of the semester.

    3 credits. Prerequisite: Photo I. Osinski

  • FA 361

    Advanced Photography: Introduction to Wet Plate Collodion

    This course explores photography’s 19th century beginnings with wet plate collodion. Students will learn how to make these beautiful, instantaneous, hand-poured objects, along with the basics of the chemistry involved. They will learn how to adapt standard film holders in order to make their glass negatives, tintypes or ambrotpes with a traditional view camera as well as how to make enlarged collodion plates from either film or digital negatives. This class will also cover some of the short history of the medium, various 19th century photographers along with contemporary practitioners. Discussion will include the context and relevance of historic processes in today’s changing photographic climate, 19th century brass lenses and spirit photography. Student will visit tour the Center for Alternative Photography in order to see a north light studio and work with 19th century reproduction cameras and original brass lenses. Students are required to have a final body of work for review at the end of the semester.

    3 credits. Prerequisite: Photo I. Visiting Artist: Joni Sternbach (Fall 2016)

  • FA 362A, FA 362B

    Advanced Photography: Lighting on Location

    This critique-based studio course explores the use of light on location in photography. Topics explored by this course will include the use and modification of available light as well as the use of portable light sources such as flash (both single and multiple), portable battery powered strobes, remote light triggers and other tools. The emphasis of this course will be on using lighting techniques outside the studio in order to gain an understanding of how light effects the way we interpret our world.

    3 credits. Prerequisite: Photo I. Vahrenwald

  • FA 363A, FA 363B

    Advanced Photography: Digital Photography

    This studio course focuses on issues related to digital imaging. Students will explore ideas related to digital work as well as techniques such as color management, various corrective measures, and options in digital cameras and printers. Issues central to photography in the digital era will be explored. Students will pursue individual projects that will be discussed in group and individual critiques.

    3 credits. Prerequisite: Photo I. Osinski/Williams

  • FA 364A

    Advanced Photography/Visiting Artists

    Emphasis in this course will be on the development of each student's work through class discussion, individual and group critiques. Student work will be viewed within a larger context of contemporary and historical issues within the visual arts. Student must be proepared to speak clearly about their ideas, present work multiple times throughout the semester and participate in class discussions and critiques.

    3 credits. Prerequisite: Photo I. Henry Wolf Chair Jack Pierson (Fall 2016)

  • FA 365A

    Advanced Photography: Digital Workflow

    In this critique-based studio class, students will advance their work by focusing on the digital color workflow. Technical instruction will include: a dvanced digital camera controls, high-end scanning techniques, Lightroom, color management through Photoshop and the use of color profiles as well as inkjet printing. Students will advance their work through individual and group critiques, discussion and workshops.

    3 credits. Prerequisite: Photo I. Fall only. Vahrenwald

  • FA 365B

    Advanced Photography: Studio Photography

    The course will primarily address lighting, including the use of hot lights, flash, and strobes, with specific studio equipment such as sweeps, diffusers, backdrops, tethered shooting, Lightroom, and Capture One. Retouching and color correction in Photoshop will be covered.

    3 credits. Prerequisite: Photo I. Spring only. Vahrenwald

  • FA 366

    Advanced Photography: Alternate Processes

    A course for students who wish to explore the possibilities of hand-applied photographic emulsions and alternative methods of printing. Processes will include liquid light, cyanotype, palladium, color copier and digital printing options. Student work will be discussed in relation to contemporary art issues.

    3 credits. Prerequisite: Photo I. Williams

  • FA 367

    Advanced Photography: Cameras

    Contemporary photographers employ a variety of technologies. This studio class will consist of a series of demonstrations and assignments to explore how the history and aesthetics of photography are inextricably linked to the technological developments of the medium. A wide spectrum of ‘cameras’ will be introduced, specifically the camera obscura, analog and digital camera formats and the panorama. Students will make analog, digital or hybrid prints of their choosing.

    3 credits. Prerequisite: Photo I. TBA

  • FA 368A, FA 368B

    Advanced Photography: Guest Artist Series

    This course is intended to help students clarify and further the growth of their own work through group and individual critiques, classroom presentations and discussions with contemporary guest artists and the instructor.

    3 credits. Prerequisite: Photo I. Osinski

  • FA 369A

    Advanced Photography

    Students will produce work using photographic material(s), camera or any photographic device of their choice. Work will be discussed in group critiques as well as individual conferences with the instructor. Photographic issues and representation will be the subject of reading and class discussions.

    3 credits. Prerequisite: Photo I. Fall only. Raad

  • FA 369B

    Advanced Photography

    This course will explore multiple-image structures in photography and will include issues and examples of sequencing, time, fictional and non- fictional narratives and meta-narratives and image and text relationships. Studio projects will be combined with lectures, presentations, field trips, readings and class discussions to provide the critical framework leading to the development and production of projects that address traditional as well as experimental methods of multiple-image structures. Projects can include but are not limited to: color/black and white, film/digital/ film stills.

    3 credits. Prerequisite: Photo I. Spring only. Morton

  • FA 469A, FA 469B

    Independent Study in Photography

    1-3 credits. Requires approval of instructor and the Dean of the School of Art


Printmaking

  • FA 250

    Silkscreen I

    This course explores screen printing as a means of communication with emphasis on the execution of these images. Students visit museums to learn to appreciate posters from various historical periods. The actual screen printing will be taught with the use of images, type and color. The goal of the course is to combine the components of art, printing and communication.

    3 credits. One-semester course. May not be repeated. Nobles.

  • FA 251

    Lithography I

    An introduction to traditional and contemporary image-making on lithographic stones and commercial aluminum plates, with emphasis on the technical aspect of the medium. The various areas to be examined include stone graining, crayon and tusche drawing, processing, proofing and edition printing procedures, etc.

    3 credits. One-semester course. May not be repeated. Gleeson/Nobles

  • FA 252

    Etching I

    An introduction to etching images on metal plates, through the use of hardground, aquatint softground. The emphasis is on the technical understanding of the medium. Other image-making processes to be covered are drypoint and engraving.

    3 credits. One-semester course. May not be repeated. Nobles/Powell

  • FA 349

    Senior Presentation Project

    This project class seeks to mentor students in the development of their senior presentations. The class presents and explores traditional and alternative curatorial and exhibition models, including one-person and group exhibitions, collaborative and curatorial projects, site- and institution specific installations, interventions and performance. Class discussions and individual meetings with the instructor will allow for a full range of critical interaction. A written component is an intrinsic part of this project whether towards the writing of project proposals, artist statements, power point lectures, or artist talks and performances. Each student is required to make a presentation to the class outlining the parameters of his or her artistic theses. Three recent graduates of the School of Art representing different artistic practices and goals, ranging from those who attend(ed) graduate school, to those in the process of developing individual or collaborative artistic practices, will be invited to give artist talks and to join in class discussions as a further articulation of the senior presentation experience within the extended Cooper community.

    3 credits. One-semester. Bordo

  • FA 350A, FA 350B

    Silkscreen Workshop

    An advanced workshop in which the students are free to explore screen printing, graphic arts and photography. There will be formal teaching of advanced photographic processes such as halftone and color separation.

    3 credits. One-semester course. Prerequisite: Silkscreen I. Nobles

  • FA 351A, FA 351B

    Lithography Workshop

    An advanced workshop concentrating on individual projects and further investigations into the reproducible image and its implications. Discussion and demonstration will be offered both in the direction of a more technical and chemical understanding of lithography and working in conjunction with other traditional print techniques.

    3 credits. One-semester course. Prerequisite: Lithography I. Nobles

  • FA 352A, FA 352B

    Etching Workshop

    This course will involve individual directions in etching as well as the development of projects combining print technique and aesthetic goals. The understanding and use of the contemporary professional print shop will be discussed.

    3 credits. One-semester course. Prerequisite: Etching I. TBA

  • FA 354A, FA 354B

    Experimental Printmaking

    The course will supplement the traditional printmaking techniques of etching, lithography and silk screen with an introduction to linoleum woodcut techniques and monoprint/ monotype combination of methods appropriate to developing an aesthetic understanding of the vocabulary of the print. Color, multiple printing, work in series or book formats will be discussed in developing student projects.

    3 credits. One-semester course. Prerequisites: 2 of the following 4 courses: Silkscreen I, Lithography I, Etching I or Papermaking Techniques. Gleeson/Nobles/Powell

  • FA 355A, FA 355B

    Relief

    Students will be instructed in various relief printing techniques, including traditional Japanese water-based woodblock and Western techniques with oil-based inks on wood and linoleum. Use of the hydraulic press will allow large format works to be produced. Hand-printing techniques will be taught as well. Small edition printing in multiple colors will be emphasized.

    3 credits. One-semester course. Shibata

  • FA 356A, FA 356B

    Etching Workshop: Photogravure

    This class will primarily teach approaches to the 19th century process of photogravure. Photogravure is a truly continuous tone photographic intaglio process. Tonalities are created by an ink layer, gradually varying in depth, with a very fine aquatint to hold the ink. Photogravure will be the starting point for the projects rather than the final step. Students should be open to continuing to work on plates with traditional intaglio techniques.

    3 credits. One-semester course. Prerequisite: Etching I or Photo I. Powell

  • FA 384A

    Projects

    This course is open to all third and fourth year students who intend to initiate or pursue a longer term (longer than a semester) art project. Students are expected to present their work-inprogress weekly, to research the works of other artists, writers, and thinkers, and to participate actively in class discussions.

    Open to all 3rd and 4th year students. May be repeated with instructor’s permission. Raad

  • FA 459A, FA 459B

    Independent Study in Printmaking

    1-3 credits. Requires approval of instructor and the Dean of the School of Art

  • TE 353

    Papermaking Techniques

    This course includes the making of traditional Western paper from rags to a finished sheet and the making of traditional Oriental paper from tree bark to a finished sheet. Students learn to use a pulp beater, dyes, sizings and a small vacuum table for molding the pulp. Simple binding and box-building techniques as well as marbling are demonstrated.

    2 credits. One-semester course. Free elective credit. DiEdwardo


Science

  • RS 201

    Science Topics vary

    3 general studies credits. Required science course. To be taken during the sophomore, junior or senior year. Armstrong/Nadin

  • RS 201a

    Earth Science

    The course will cover a broad range of Earth Science topics including understanding rocks and the stories they tell, the vast scale of geological time, dynamic plate tectonic processes, climate change, and what makes the planet habitable for life. It will inspire wonder and a deep appreciation for the Earth. The course will present to students a different way of looking at the Earth: not as something that is constant and static but rather dynamic and constantly changing, a place with a broad and exciting history of which we are only a small part.

  • RS 201c

    Science of the Mind

    Over the last 10 years there has been a revolution in our understanding of the workings of the mind. This course offers a comprehensive yet accessible survey of these new developments in the understanding of the workings of the brain. It will explore how these discoveries are altering the most basic concepts we have about ourselves and how we perceive the world. The course begins by familiarizing the students with an outline of the anatomy of the brain and its neurological function and then progresses to consider new theoretical models of consciousness. The course also explores the laws of the visual brain and how those laws govern our perception of the visual world.

  • RS 201d

    Optics for Artists

    This course covers the fundamentals of optics using a non-mathematical approach, relying on provocative demonstrations and hands-on experimentation with an emphasis on explaining phenomena observed in everyday life. Topics will include the nature of light, optical elements (lenses, mirrors, prisms), cameras, the theory of “color,” visual perception and optical illusions, light detection (eye, film, digital cameras) and more advanced concepts of particular interest to the students (holography, lasers, liquid crystals, etc.).

  • RS 201e

    Pattern Formation

    Patterns, both in space and time, are ubiquitous in the natural world. In this course, we will distinguish between patterns that arise from explicit design and construction and those that arise spontaneously from the actions and behaviors of simple units. Concentrating on these self-organizing systems, we will explore topics such as: the characteristic stripes and spots of animals, the shifting landscapes of desert sand dunes, the hexagonal forms of honeycombs, the symmetry of snowflakes, the synchronization of flashing in firefly swarms, the transformation from embryos to organisms, convection patterns in fluids, the development of social networks and the growth of cities. Our focus will be on understanding the mechanisms that can explain how such systems come to be. The course will be conducted as a combination of lectures, seminars, laboratory exercises, and independent projects.

  • RS 201f

    Current Issues in Biology

    This introductory course will provide an understanding of the science behind many of the current issues facing society. The goal is to provide biological literacy in order to evaluate scientific arguments presented in topics related to human disease and current events affecting human health such as stem cell research, genetically-modified food and genetic testing.

  • RS 201g

    Astronomy

    This course begins with an historical overview and then introduces the contemporary understanding of the universe. Students learn about the key elements of the universe, including motion, energy, gravity and light. Topics include; the solar system and its origins; the sun; stellar evolution including white dwarfs, neutron stars, and black holes; galaxies beginning with the structure of the Milky Way; dark matter, dark energy and the Big Bang theory. Labs and field trips to an observatory augment class discussion.

  • RS 201h

    Topics in Physics: Space, Time, Light & Matter

    The course provides an overview of discoveries in physics over the past two millenia, focusing on the development of modern theories. Topics include nature of light and matter, relativity, quantum mechanics, evolution of the universe and the nature of science. Knowledge of basic algebra is assumed. Field trips and computer lab assignments are included in the syllabus.


Sculpture

  • FA 391A, FA 391B

    Sculpture

    This course helps students develop projects related to their own vision and ideas. Class discussions address the full range of conceptual and material processes that generate production. Research and development will be given equal weight to finished work. Intention, form, materiality and context will be analyzed against larger questions of culture in relation to artistic practice. Student work will be reviewed by the entire class and by the instructor on an individual basis. Lectures, readings and field trips will complement studio critiques.

    3 credits. One-semester course. Adams

  • FA 392A, FA 392B

    Sculpture

    This course is based on the development of an in-depth practice that connects to the multiple properties of sculpture. Thematic subjects will be open, based on individual body of work, at the same time, subject positioning, viewer/author relationship, and clarity of reading will be studied. Classes will be guided by the theoretical and affective connections the students have in their engagement with materials and the practice of sculpture as idea and as concrete daily activity. Ideas and mediums will be discussed and analyzed in relation to context, and historical grounding. Texts of different kinds will be used as complementary to the work being produced and as tools for each student. Group critiques will focus on delving deeply into each student’s work with special emphasis on connecting what the student wants the work to be, how it functions, is experienced and read.

    3 credits. Lehyt

  • FA 393A, FA 393B

    Sculpture

    This course helps students explore and develop their personal process of making art, with an emphasis on sculpture. Formal and material choices will be discussed in relation to intention, meaning, context, and contemporary culture. Research and development are given equal weight to finished work. Students will discuss their process individually with the instructor, and present work for review to the entire class. In-class slide presentations, readings, and field trips will complement class discussions.

  • FA 394A, FA 394B

    Sculpture

    This course takes a concrete approach to the development of critical discourse about works of art. It exercises the student’s ability to analyze the activity of making sculpture in particular and advances the student’s understanding of how to proceed in the studio. Problems of structure, materials, meaning, intention and context are the subject of class discussion.

    3 credits. One-semester course. Farmiga/Magid

  • FA 396A, FA 396B

    Sculpture: Seminar in Public Art

    This course focuses on the production of artworks that question and/or reinvent the boundaries between public and private spheres. Student projects will be generated and analyzed in relation to current transformations in culture and technology as they affect the meaning of “publicness.” Complementing studio production will be lectures, readings and discussions that engage social, political and urban issues relevant to the topic. Traditional approaches to public art, such as enhancement and commemoration will be challenged by more temporal and critical strategies Historical examples will be examined, including the Flaneur, Russian Constructivism, the Situationists, Fluxus and Conceptualism, as well as the most recent example of public interventions.

    3 credits. Adams

  • FA 397A, FA 397B

    Sculpture: Open Studio

    This course takes a concrete approach to the development of critical discourse about works of art. It exercises the student’s ability to analyze the activity of making sculpture in particular and advances the student’s understanding of how to proceed in the studio. Problems of structure, materials, meaning, intention and context are the subject of class discussion.

    3 credits. One-semester. Ashford

  • FA 398A, FA 398B

    Sculpture

    This course helps students develop projects related to their own vision and ideas. Class discussions address the full range of conceptual and material processes that generate production. Research and development will be given equal weight to finished work. Intention, form, materiality and context will be analyzed against larger questions of culture in relation to artistic practice. Student work will be reviewed by the entire class and by the instructor on an individual basis. Lectures, readings and field trips will complement studio critiques.

    3 credits. One-semester. Raven

  • FA 499A, FA 499B

    Independent Study in Sculpture

    1-3 credits. Requires approval of instructor and the Dean of the School of Art

  • TE 390

    Casting Techniques

    Casting Techniques is a process intensive course covering the methods of translating a wax positive into bronze or other non-ferrous metals. All associated techniques from beginning a plaster or rubber mold to casting, chasing, finishing and patination of metal sculptures will be covered. Students will explore a variety of approaches to casting, as well as engage in discussions involving the history of bronze casting, and its place in contemporary art.

    2 credits. One-semester course. May not be repeated. Free elective credit. Wilhelm


Sound Art

  • FA 281

    Project in Sound Art

    This class will introduce strategies for understanding and participating in the aural world. The course is divided into specific weekly topics, including acoustic ecology, circuit-bending, radio transmission, synaesthesia and others. Screenings, readings and discussion are supported by hands-on workshops in capturing, manipulating and reproducing sound in unconventional ways. Grading is based on three student projects and participation in class discussions.

    3 credits. One-semester course. May not be repeated. Poff


Electives

  • FA 290

    Elements of Performance

    This course examines the elements that unify the diverse set of practices gathered as “performance art.” Engaging concepts of time, movement, voice, text and body in performance based work, the course addresses both the historical development of performance practices within the field of contemporary art, as well as their current manifestations. Lectures, screenings, readings and discussions support the development of individual and collaborative studio work.

    3 credits. One-semester course. May not be repeated. Visiting Artist: Lauren Bakst

  • FA 395

    Performance

    Performance or the live event has been a continuous element of art practice throughout most of the 20th century. The changing technologies of sound and digital recording devices and their increasing availability have enhanced the possibilities of documentation and allowed artists to consider the mediation and documentation of a live event as an integral part of the work itself. In this course, students will examine the interaction between performance and its documentation through practical, historical and theoretical interrogation. The class proposes to address documentation, not as an inadequate representation nor as a nostalgic marker but as something that operates within a distinct system that can become a vital site of art production. This class takes an interdisciplinary approach to making performance work. The medium of performance and its utilization of photography, video and sound will be explored. Students will read and discuss texts, looking at the work of other artists and making their own work.

    3 credits. One semester course. Visiting Artist Yve Laris Cohen (Fall 2016)

  • FA 419

    Independent Study in Calligraphy

    1-3 credits. Requires approval of instructor and the Dean of the School of Art.

  • SE 401A&B

    Contemporary Art Issues

    Topic for Fall 2016: What is contemporary art? What are its conditions? How do we engage, analyze and/or construct it? This course will explore topics in contemporary art through the exploration of critical texts and artist practices. Lectures, presentations, critiques, visits to key exhibitions and guest speakers will allow for an extended and in-depth look at concepts such as materiality, intersectionality and multiplicity in the present-day context.

    2 art history credits. One-semester course. May be repeated once for art history credit. Hewitt

  • SE 403A, SE 403B

    IntraDisciplinary Seminar

    This course is a hybrid between a lecture series and discussion seminar. It is intended to provide a stimulating and rigorous forum between students’ artistic concerns and those of twelve visiting speakers in a public lecture series of the School of Art. Class discussions will center on diverse presentations by artists, theorists, activists, designers, writers, curators, gallerists and other practitioners involved in the arts from positions that embody an interdisciplinary approach or that imply new uses for disciplinary traditions. Accordingly, the course is designed to introduce students to some of the debates currently driving contemporary art and the larger social context it embodies. Members of the class are expected to be active partici­pants and will therefore be asked to respond with some intellectual invention to a variety of topics with weekly discussions, readings, and written or oral presentations.

    2 credits. Free elective credit. Cameron

  • TE 216

    Calligraphy

    Geometry, optical balance and the stroke of the broad-edge pen are primary influences that shape the Roman alphabet. Students learn the fundamentals of “beautiful writing” through the study of historical models and the principles that are the basis of classical and modern letterforms. Exercises in ink train the hand kinaesthetically to write letters with graceful movement. Exercises in pencil train the eye to see and analyze the subtle geometry and skeletal “ideal” form of letters. Precise rhythm in letterspacing and careful line-spacing create the color and texture of the page. The class will have an emphasis on page design involving hand written compositions. Roman and Italic capitals and small letters will be the focus of first semester students. Those who repeat may be introduced to other historical hands.

    2 credits. One-semester course. May be repeated once. Free elective credit. DiEdwardo

  • TE 304

    Techniques in After Effects

    This course explores techniques and projects in Adobe After Effects. Students will complete projects that demonstrate their skill and understanding of visual effects and motion graphics. Projects will be faculty and student generated.

    2 credits. One-semester course. Cannot be repeated. Free elective credit. McWreath

  • TE 305

    Techniques in HTML and Programming

    This course explores programming techniques using HTML, CSS, Javascript and other data formats. Students will complete projects that demonstrate their skill and understanding of building web sites and basic programming. The purpose of this course is for the student to develop the skills necessary to utilize the many and varied web technologies for their artistic and professional practices.

    2 credits. One-semester course. Cannot be repeated. Free elective credit. Kendall

  • Founded by inventor, industrialist and philanthropist Peter Cooper in 1859, The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art offers education in art, architecture and engineering, as well as courses in the humanities and social sciences.

  • “My feelings, my desires, my hopes, embrace humanity throughout the world,” Peter Cooper proclaimed in a speech in 1853. He looked forward to a time when, “knowledge shall cover the earth as waters cover the great deep.”

  • From its beginnings, Cooper Union was a unique institution, dedicated to founder Peter Cooper's proposition that education is the key not only to personal prosperity but to civic virtue and harmony.

  • Peter Cooper wanted his graduates to acquire the technical mastery and entrepreneurial skills, enrich their intellects and spark their creativity, and develop a sense of social justice that would translate into action.