Spring 2014 Feltman Lecture: Natalie Jeremijenko

Tuesday, April 01, 2014, 7:00pm - 9:00pm

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Image courtesy Natalie Jeremijenko Image courtesy Natalie Jeremijenko Image courtesy Natalie Jeremijenko Image courtesy Natalie Jeremijenko
Image courtesy Natalie Jeremijenko

Natalie Jeremijenko will present the 2014 Feltman Lecture.

Natalie Jeremijenko was awarded the 2013 Most Innovative People award, named one of the most influential women in technology 2011, and was named as one of the inaugural top young innovators by MIT Technology Review and 40 most influential designers.  Jeremijenko directs the Environmental Health Clinic, and is an Associate Professor in the Visual Art Department, NYU and affiliated with the Computer Science Dept and Environmental Studies program.  Previously she was on the Visual Arts faculty at UCSD, Faculty of Engineering at Yale University, a visiting professor at Royal College of Art in London, and a Distinguished Visiting Professor in the Public Understanding of Science at Michigan State University. Her degrees are in biochemistry, engineering, neuroscience and History and Philosophy of Science. 

The Feltman lectures are made possible by the Ellen and Sidney Feltman Fund established at The Cooper Union to advance the principles and benefits of lighting design through the exploration of the practical, philosophical and aesthetic attributes of light and illumination.

The 2013-2014 Feltman Chair in Lighting is held by Lydia Kallipoliti

This event is presented by The Irwin S. Chanin School of Architecture and The Cooper Union Institute for Sustainable Design.

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

 
 

Located in The Frederick P. Rose Auditorium, at 41 Cooper Square (on Third Avenue between 6th and 7th Streets)

  • Founded by inventor, industrialist and philanthropist Peter Cooper in 1859, The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art offers education in art, architecture and engineering, as well as courses in the humanities and social sciences.

  • “My feelings, my desires, my hopes, embrace humanity throughout the world,” Peter Cooper proclaimed in a speech in 1853. He looked forward to a time when, “knowledge shall cover the earth as waters cover the great deep.”

  • From its beginnings, Cooper Union was a unique institution, dedicated to founder Peter Cooper's proposition that education is the key not only to personal prosperity but to civic virtue and harmony.

  • Peter Cooper wanted his graduates to acquire the technical mastery and entrepreneurial skills, enrich their intellects and spark their creativity, and develop a sense of social justice that would translate into action.