Parking Information

The Cooper Union is easily accessible by public transportation and encourages all visitors to use public transportation when possible. Please click here to learn more about the closest subway, bus, and train stations. If you plan to visit by car, please allow extra time to navigate New York City traffic and to secure parking. The Cooper Union does not have designated visitor parking, and limited street parking may be available.

There are multiple parking garages near The Cooper Union; however, it is recommended that you contact a parking garage ahead of time to ensure availability. Suggested parking garages can be found below.

Parking GaragesAddressPhone Number
Edison ParkFast

375 Lafayette Street (between Great Jones & East 4th Streets)

888-PARKFAST
Champion Parking

60 East 8th Street (between Mercer Street & Broadway)

212-473-9061
Key Parking LLC

115 East 9th Street (between 3rd & 4th Avenues)

212-253-2502
Lafayette Place Parking LLC

64 Cooper Square (between Astor Place & 7th Street)

212-777-1659
Little Man Parking

220 East 9th Street (between 2nd & 3rd Avenues)

212-979-5708
University 10 Parking LLC

50 East 10th Street (between University & Broadway)

212-979-5380

Please Note: The Cooper Union's parking garage listing does not constitute an endorsement of or affiliation with any parking garage property by The Cooper Union or Office of Admissions.

 

  • Founded by inventor, industrialist and philanthropist Peter Cooper in 1859, The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art offers education in art, architecture and engineering, as well as courses in the humanities and social sciences.

  • “My feelings, my desires, my hopes, embrace humanity throughout the world,” Peter Cooper proclaimed in a speech in 1853. He looked forward to a time when, “knowledge shall cover the earth as waters cover the great deep.”

  • From its beginnings, Cooper Union was a unique institution, dedicated to founder Peter Cooper's proposition that education is the key not only to personal prosperity but to civic virtue and harmony.

  • Peter Cooper wanted his graduates to acquire the technical mastery and entrepreneurial skills, enrich their intellects and spark their creativity, and develop a sense of social justice that would translate into action.