Intra-Disciplinary Seminar Public Lecture: Ramzi Kassem

Tuesday, September 19, 2017, 7:00pm - 8:00pm

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The Intra-Disciplinary Seminar (IDS) Public Lecture Series presents a lecture by Ramzi Kassem entitled "Guantánamo or the Limit of Law." It is free and open to the public.

Ramzi Kassem is professor of law at the City University of New York where he directs the Immigrant & Non-Citizen Rights Clinic and is the founding director of the CLEAR project. With his students, he represents prisoners of various nationalities held at Guantánamo Bay and other American detention facilities worldwide, New Yorkers and others of all stripes who find themselves in the crosshairs of the sprawling U.S. security state, as well as immigrants and asylum-seekers. Before joining the CUNY law faculty in 2009, Kassem taught at Yale and Fordham. His interests include issues at the intersection of law and security, the legal and policy responses to the September 11th attacks and other real or perceived national security crises, the rights of minorities and non-citizens, and international humanitarian law. Kassem is a graduate of Columbia College and holds law degrees from Columbia Law School, where he was a Senior Editor for the Columbia Law Review, and from the Sorbonne.

The IDS Public Lecture Series, consists of lectures by artists, theorists, activists, designers, writers, curators and other practitioners involved in the arts from positions that embody an interdisciplinary approach or that imply new uses for disciplinary traditions.

The IDS Public Lecture Series is part of the Robert Lehman Visiting Artist Program at The Cooper Union. We are grateful for major funding and support from the Robert Lehman Foundation.

Located in The Frederick P. Rose Auditorium, at 41 Cooper Square (on Third Avenue between 6th and 7th Streets)

  • Founded by inventor, industrialist and philanthropist Peter Cooper in 1859, The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art offers education in art, architecture and engineering, as well as courses in the humanities and social sciences.

  • “My feelings, my desires, my hopes, embrace humanity throughout the world,” Peter Cooper proclaimed in a speech in 1853. He looked forward to a time when, “knowledge shall cover the earth as waters cover the great deep.”

  • From its beginnings, Cooper Union was a unique institution, dedicated to founder Peter Cooper's proposition that education is the key not only to personal prosperity but to civic virtue and harmony.

  • Peter Cooper wanted his graduates to acquire the technical mastery and entrepreneurial skills, enrich their intellects and spark their creativity, and develop a sense of social justice that would translate into action.