Leslie Hewitt

Assistant Professor

Leslie Hewitt studied at the Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art, the Yale University School of Art, and at New York University, where she was a Clark Fellow in the Africana and Visual Culture Studies programs. She was included in the 2008 Whitney Biennial and the recipient of the 2008 Art Matters research grant to the Netherlands. A selection of recent exhibitions include the Museum of Modern Art in New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York; The Walker Art Center in Minneapolis; Project Row Houses in Houston; and LA><ART in Los Angeles. Hewitt has held residencies at the Studio Museum in Harlem, the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University and the American Academy in Berlin, Germany amongst others. She was a faculty member at Barnard College in the department of Art History 2012-2017, where she was actively engaged in the Harlem Semester.

lesliehewitt.info

Hewitt in conversation with a student during the Intra-disciplinary seminar. Photograph by Argenis Apolinario (A'03).
Hewitt in conversation with a student during the Intra-disciplinary seminar. Photograph by Argenis Apolinario (A'03).

 

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  • Peter Cooper wanted his graduates to acquire the technical mastery and entrepreneurial skills, enrich their intellects and spark their creativity, and develop a sense of social justice that would translate into action.